Plato, in his “Republic,” gave a different version of the legend of King Ara Keghetsig. According to Plato, Er was an Armenian or the son of Armenios, a native of Pampylia. He was slain in battle, and ten days later, when the bodies of the dead were gathered already rotting, his body seemed to be unaffected by decay. On the 12th day, as he was lying on the funeral pyre, he returned to life and gave an account of what he had seen in the other world. Plato also wrote that Socrates had told him: “Our wisdom comes from Er of Armenia, the secrets of immortality.”

 

Plato, in his “Republic,” gave a different version of the legend of King Ara Keghetsig. According to Plato, Er was an Armenian or the son of Armenios, a native of Pampylia. He was slain in battle, and ten days later, when the bodies of the dead were gathered already rotting, his body seemed to be unaffected by decay. On the 12th day, as he was lying on the funeral pyre, he returned to life and gave an account of what he had seen in the other world. Plato also wrote that Socrates had told him: “Our wisdom comes from Er of Armenia, the secrets of immortality.”

 

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