King Ardavazt (ruled 56 B.C. to 34 B.C., died 34 B.C.). Son of King Tigran II (“the Great”), he fought for the elimination of Greater Armenia’s independence on Rome. The defeat of the Romans in the battle with the Parthians near Carrhae in 53 B.C, and the Parthian-Armenian alliance strengthened the independence of Greater Armenia. Ardavazt recovered Sophene and Cilicia (Little Armenia) which Romans had wrested from Armenia. In 37 B.C. he refused to participate in a Roman attack on the Parthians. Three years later the Romans invaded Armenia and through deceit abducted him and his family to Egypt, where Cleopatra and her paramour Marc Antony beheaded him. Ardavazt was a historian and dramatist.

King Ardavazt (ruled 56 B.C. to 34 B.C., died 34 B.C.). Son of King Tigran II (“the Great”), he fought for the elimination of Greater Armenia’s independence on Rome. The defeat of the Romans in the battle with the Parthians near Carrhae in 53 B.C, and the Parthian-Armenian alliance strengthened the independence of Greater Armenia. Ardavazt recovered Sophene and Cilicia (Little Armenia) which Romans had wrested from Armenia. In 37 B.C. he refused to participate in a Roman attack on the Parthians. Three years later the Romans invaded Armenia and through deceit abducted him and his family to Egypt, where Cleopatra and her paramour Marc Antony beheaded him. Ardavazt was a historian and dramatist.

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