Archive comments from 2007-2008

The following are some of the comments about the various items posted in Keghart.com. They are the opinions expressed by readers who solely are responsible for posting them. Remarks that are off topic, defamatory, obscene, abusive, threatening or invade privacy are removed. The right to post partial, some, all or none of the submitted materials is reserved. Comments are not live and will be published irregularly.  We apologize for any inconvenience.



Scream Bloody Murder?

The only reason to 'Scream Bloody Murder' about an event is if that event needs to be screamed about. If Christiane Amanpour chose to scream about the incomplete genocides, i.e. the Holocaust, Rwanda, Cambodia…, then she wasted her time. No need to scream there, because everyone has already heard.

To the few who wonder what I mean by 'incomplete genocide', I remind you that according to Lemkin, genocide's last phase, that which completes it, is Denial of Genocide.

Therefore while the Holocaust, Rwanda and Cambodia are forms of genocide, the only currently true genocide is that committed against the Armenians. Amanpour's political maneuverings in this show bring her dangerously close to obfuscation of the one true genocide. This not only means she has wasted her time, and voice, in this 'Screaming', but she came close to participating in the final stage of the one true genocide. Any hand given to any phase of genocide is, by definitiona, a hand of a genocidaire.
Berge Minassian, Toronto 12/6/08
Where is Hay Tad, Tashnag, Ramgavar and the so called Armenian Congress, not to mention all the Armenian Lobby groups in the U.S. We may write blogs or individual emails to CNN. For as long as we do not show teeth through a strong organized representation we are nobody.

The Turkish propaganda works, because they are organized and they have dedicated system to oppose anything that brings up the matter of the Armenian Genocide. We should have had an official press communiqué ready and out within minutes after airing this CNN nonsense. Did you see such an official  communiqué addressed to Ms. Amanpour? If there is such a thing from any of our parties, officials, etc …then please accept my apologies. If not, then do not blame the Turks for being one step ahead of us!

Until such day that we have not  become one organized party fighting for all Armenians, and continue to be a portion of tashnag, a portion of ramgavar, a portion of hentchag, a portion of Antelias, a portion of Etchmiazin, we will never progress in our cause!

No one should take this personally; it is democracy, and I am expressing only my humble opinion!
 
A concerned Armenian, Montreal 12/6/08

Bravo!

As long as we are fragmented we are nobody; damned right you are! We have not as yet learned to do team work properly, exceptions granted.

Gaytzag Palandjian, Florida 12/12/08
 

Other

Minister of Culture of Armenia did not attend the Conference in Baku

Today's news has it that Ms. Hasmik Poghosyan, Minister of Culture of Armenia did not participate at a conference organized in Baki – that's the way they write and pronounce Baku. It was carried under the auspices of a British diplomat who talked at length with the interlocutor – I was watching one of many Armenian Channels of LA. I  quote  him, "I  am sorry  Armenia  did  not  send  its  representative over.”  The theme at said conference was preservation of Azeri   historical monuments, now being “destroyed” by the Nagornyi Karabagh Armenians.
Some nerve!!!  Witness the destruction just a few years ago of thousands of Armenian Khatchkars in Julfa. Nothing was said about these when Armenians protested from all corners of the world. Here I would like to   interject one, only one clever and sharp-minded Armenian – no, not exactly a politician but probably like self, an activist. At a live TV discussion that was being televised from Armenia's H1 channel at that juncture of time, he heatedly defended his opinion and shouted at  the top  of  his lungs, "This  minute, this  minute  our participants – at  the OSCE MINSK organized  so called  peace  initiatives/meetings with the counterpart  Azeris – should  leave until  they  stop  this  barbarian  act  and ask forgiveness."  No one heeded him.  
When in Yerevan I enquired a friend who this man was, and expressed my wish that I wanted to shake hands with him. My Armenian friend in a dismissive way said," He is a Marxist." “So what!”  I retorted.  “Let  him be  a  Maoist  for all that matters; he  is  a capable  person  and  correct  in  his  judgment”. I  added, "You don't go around  judging  people  by what ideology they profess; if he first and foremost  puts  Armenia's interests,  security  and  well being above all, then he is a true Armenian. 
Back to the news – it is commendable that Ms. Poghosyan, our Minister of Culture – and by extension, our Government and National Assembly – disapproved going to Baki. By the by, have the Azeris come to ask forgiveness for what they did in Julfa? The question is to that Mr. Inglese, who probably underestimates our, albeit  small State/Nation's ability to  at  least  now  start  to evaluate correctly what is at stake  and counteract against  ugly  articulations.
 
Hamahaigagani SIRO,
Gaytzag Palandjian, FL USA/Spain California, 12/4/08
 

Request, Prayer to all Armenians in the Diaspora

It is evident that during the next couple of months, international political and historical developments will take place in the region of South-Caucasus. The actual truth of the Armenian Genocide, which is the most sensitive issue for the whole Armenian nation, will not only go unrecognised, but its very existence will be on the table of negotiations which are already being put into place.
Every day, we read numerous political analyses about these questions and all of them deserve our respect.
I hereby wish to pass over the Armenian Government’s position on our Genocide which was the 20th Century’s first Genocide.
Thus, I consider that the sacred duty to face this problem and defend it by struggling for its recognition belongs to the Armenians in the Diaspora.
Therefore, I request and implore – to avoid working in a partisan way – that each organisation should not try to resist the “storm” by taking action on its own.
As one people, one nation, let us form a responsible Body.
I address my request to all religious and clerical, big and small, communities, be it Evangelical, Roman Catholic or Armenian Apostolic, to all political parties active in the Armenian Diaspora, with all their respective affiliate branches, political, benevolent or charitable, cultural, sportive, etc. all of them, so that no one can later complain and say: “why were we not invited to participate?… ”.
Thus, by combining all their efforts together, let them adopt a general strategy and decide on the tactics which will enable them to work in a complementary way. The task should be entrusted to an executive body formed by a few skilled persons, representative of all participants.
My request is that if we believe that this holy mission belongs to the Armenians of the Diaspora then we do not have the right to lose time. Let us not plunge ourselves in small unimportant particulars such as who of the initiators of this action will get the credit. To speak about honours or credit at this moment is ridiculous. The responsibility belongs to all of us without exception.
If not, I would not wish that the words expressed, tens of years ago, by Avedis Aharonian fall upon us as a curse:
“If all the suffering we endured is one day forgotten by our children, let all the shame of the world fall on the Armenians”.
Sincere best wishes.
Varoujan Knouni
e-mail: [email protected]
Athens, October 31, 2008.

Why is the picture of the sacred cave monastery of Geghart associated with political views? I wish you could find another image to represent peoples' views and let the beauty remain in peace Thank you for hosting this page.
Anonymous 10/6/2008


Petition, No; Boycott, Yes
Nov. 30, 2008     
From: Bagrad Nazarian

To: Several People

First the petition and now this (call for total blockade of Armenia!) and still continuing with mindless idiocies put out by that Bruce Tasker character. It just goes to show that Haykakan Jamanak has found its match in Canada.
With this particular article by Andy Kevorkian (you remember him from your 2003 UK lecture tour I hope) perhaps someone should remind him and Geghart that they’re really far behind Turkey and Azerbaijan, because much worse than what they’re prescribing, i.e. petition and boycott, has been actively and aggressively practiced by Turkey and Azerbaijan for years/decades: namely the blockade (so far failed) and the attempt to destroy Armenia! And I know as a matter of fact [… he] has not “invested” even a penny in Armenia and the thought of even visiting Armenia just once has never entered his […] head!
What fools!

Regards, Bagrad
PS: Is there any concrete report about the journalist who got beaten up? Any evidence as to who he is, who beat him and why?

Dec 01, 2008
Dear Mr. Nazarian,

Thank you for your note.I wonder whether you would like me to post your comment in the Visitors’ Section.Thank you for your attention.

Dikran Abrahamian
Dec 3, 2008

Dear Mr. Abrahamian,
Thank you for your kind offer to publish/post my comment in the Visitors’ section of Keghart. Some result at last! Considering you have chosen to ignore completely my many other critical comments. Please go ahead!
May I also point out that it is an unfortunate fact that journalists across the world are murdered on regular basis but when it comes to starting petitions and boycotts in support of (harassed, assaulted, violated, murdered, etc.) journalists it might be a good idea for you to do such for Turkey where journalists (and publishers and other free thinkers) are prosecuted and persecuted, beaten up, harassed, murdered, etc. as a matter of daily routine. Hrant Dink, unfortunately, is just one example of this.
After all with Canada being a member of NATO and neighbours with the greatest NATO country across the border supporting Turkey (namely USA), such petitions and boycotts might carry a little more weight against the biggest NATO bully, namely Turkey, who just happens to be our (Armenia’s) biggest neighbour with not much love lost for us, to put it mildly! Secondly may I emphasise that Artsakh, as an unrecognised territory, has no access to any international funds and finance from the World Bank, International Monetary Fund (IMF), the European Bank for Reconstruction and Development (EBRD), to mention but a few. Not only that but even big international charities are also reluctant or unable to invest or have a presence in Artsakh due to the assumed “instability” and “unstable” political situation or confusing borders, not to mention hyped up corruption and chaos, etc. charges.
Your petitions and calls for boycotts, not to mention Bruce Tasker type mindless “articles” only add to the misconceptions and confusion, potentially depriving our patriots in Artsakh (and by extension in Armenia) valuable resources, something which, as I have pointed out previously, Turkey and Azerbaijan have attempted to do through blockades and other aggressive behaviour well known to you.
Finally when it comes to fighting corruption, another unfortunate but undeniable reality in Armenia, I much rather follow the advice and example of Baroness Caroline Cox with whom I have had the privilege of travelling to Armenia and Artsakh on several occasions. Her personal, admittedly sympathetic but nevertheless, I believe, wise and experienced advice to those who have expressed their loud and often exaggerated “frustrations about corruption in Armenia” has been: “You Diaspora Armenians have a duty to come and get involved and teach them your business western experience and fight any manifestation of corruption by example. What are you waiting for!? What good is there waiting until everything has been sorted out which will be sooner or later”.
Let me point out, as someone with a modest investment in Artsakh since 2003 – and regular visits since 1994 – that my experience of “corruption” in Armenia/Artsakh has been minimal but nevertheless uncompromising with very positive outcomes overall. So I have found the Lady’s advice good, practical and spot on accurate.
 

Best regards,
Bagrad Nazarian
PS: I take the liberty of copying Lady Cox into this e-mail as I have made a reference to her here.
 
 

Karabakh?Genocide – The Deception

[…] Geghart started well and still has a great deal that's good. But for Geghart to give such prominent and uncritical space to such obvious nonsense and blatantly anti-Armenian propaganda is extremely worrying and unwarranted. If this is done in the  name of "freedom of expression" then clearly Mr Tasker has the complete freedom to speak as much […] as he likes as no one in Armenia ("the Kocharian/Sargsyan regime", etc.) seems to limit his freedom to talk nonsense, but why should Geghart so consistently allocate so much valuable space to spread the said poisonous pollution/nonsense? What is the point of it? If it is space that you need to fill with a certain quota of “Kocharian/Sargsyan regime”, etc., etc., blind hatred nonsense then, may I suggest that you simply translate into English and publish far more superior and sophisticated quality hate literature and big lies produced at Haykakan Jamanak stables rather than Mr Tasker’s amateurish but pompous endeavours.

Bagrad Nazarian, London
11/23/08

Bruce Tasker [….] knows so little about what actually is in the minds of near seven million Armenians.  He keeps grinding his [outdated] axe over and over again: that Hayastan, Nagornyi Karabagh/Artsakh are about to be given away, [and] Hay Tad is also to be totally forgotten. [….] I ask him to look around and see what the majority of the Armenian people of Armenia and Artsakh think of ceding even a palm of Armenian liberated territories. Instead of talking about our demand from Turkey for blood money, thousands of churches/monasteries destroyed, […]death marches, [he] imagines that we have forgotten all and will give away land [under] pressure from the Yankees or the Ivanoviches. We know our lesson well, rest assured.[…] Not an inch of land will be ceded. I cordially ask the OSCE Minsk group to go on peace making missions to Ankara, not Artsakh, [which] is independent and will never negotiate its liberty with any power.

Armen Araratian
11/21/08

Deception is the core attribute of politics. Whoever is not deceptive he or she is not a very good politician. I value Kcocharian/Sarkisian's regime. Mr. Tasker is aware of diferences between an agremment/declaration/Treaty. What was signed in Moscow was a declaration between parties which is not binding, in any way, [on] Karabakh. Remember, Armenians are not a tribe that their leader can decide their future for them. Those days are gone. Today, Armenia and Karabakh are strong enough that their enemies have declared, at least on paper, to deal with them peacefully. In fact for more than 14 years Azarbaijan has not been able to retake [the] so called lost territories. As to bribing our leaders, I think, it is nonsense speculation, because no one can bribe all Armenians.
The only way Azerbaijan can realize its oil dollars is security and peace with Armenians. That is why Azerbaijan pushed to obtain [a] peace declaration with Armenia through Russia.

Papken Harutunian 11/19/08.
 

A Turning Point: Armenian Officials Take the Bold Steps

One of the best articles I've ever read so far.

Sarkis Karapetyan, 11/19/08

The situation in Artsakh at this moment is not hopeful. First, there is not one single country that recognizes the republic, not even Armenia. Secondly, the Armenian people can't afford another war, neither physically nor financially. As we all know, we don't have huge oil fields like the Azeriz do. The third fact is that our enemies Israel and Turkey are continuing to sell enormous heavy weapons to Azerbaijan […] The Jewish people were kicked out from Eygypt, Spain, Portugal, Germany, Palestine, Russia etc. Armenians have allways protected them. Examples: when the Arabs were trying to massaccre the Jews in the old city of Jerusalem, the Armenians opend the gates of the Armenian monastery in Jerusalem to give them a safe passage through the Zion Gate to west Jerusalem; when the Russian Tsar was planning to massaccre them because they were not christians, the Armenian people gave them refuge in Armenia where they are staying until today; after being [driven] out of spain the Armenian merchants helped them to do business in Europe. Unfortunatly, instead of being thankful, Israel is trying to destroy our nation by selling arms to our enemies, robbing us from our lands  in Palestine, fighting against the recognition of The Armenian Genocide etc. this is really beyond human imagination.
The Turks are doing exactly the same. They came to our country, massaccred us, robbed us from our land; they are selling weapons to our enemies and denying the Armenian Genocide
 
It's true that Obama will try to respect his promisses to the Armenian people, but unfortunatly some of his top advisers will do anything in their power to mislead him.

Nicolai Romashuk Hairabedian,11/19/08.
Obama’s Election Forces Turkey To Rethink its Demands from Armenia

Turkey has a definite strategy in reaching the American communities, lawmakers, including the next president. The Armenian Diaspora needs to redefine, educate, energise its base, focus its mission, and activate its full ressources if its goals and vision are going to be realized. The time is now!
Alain, USA, 11/19/08
 

A Letter to a Friend – Why the Silence and Inactivity?

I just got back from a tour of Armenia with my family. My first time there and a life time dreamcome true. I had an opportunity to speak to many individuals, albeit in my Malatiazi western Armenian.  It surprised me that the locals in Yerevan thought that Americans DID NOT support the Genocide issue! Where did they get this notion from? I rationalized that perhaps they thought if Pres Bush was against it everyone in the US was also, including Armenian Americans. I asked several people whether there was any truth to Armenian Gov't officials caving in to Turkish pressure on the Genocide issue. Most Gov't workers and semi officials either said no or claimed ignorance. Most of the people on the street and especially most cab drivers ( super down to earth individuals) said they were afraid so. I was shocked and quite furious to say the least. This matter does not belong to the Gov't in Yerevan alone. Invariably it wasn't their parents and grandparents who were slaughtered, it belongs ever more so to us whose parentage was from Eastern Turkey. Local ARF officials with whom I've shared my observations have indicated that these recent rumors are troubling to them as well and if the matter appears to becoming reality, the ARF might pull out of the coalition Gov't.

Michael Mirakian, Palisades Park NJ, 11/14/08

Your letter is not for unity but to divide the communities.The amount of work done by ANC is beyond your understanding. You are against them because they are not sharing your ideas of destruction of the Armenian government. We know the opposition’s leaders and how much money they received. We are not passive and silent community. We are very active and vibrant but sorry we are not sharing your extreme and dangerous ideas
Anonymous 11/14/08
It's not only "The Silence and Inactivity". The truth and the answer is that the Armenian political parties, if not all of them, at least most of them are corrupt and divided. […………] The ARF is satisfied because it has ministerial posts [……] The Henchaks and the Ramgavars are all so divided; it's sad to see their hopelessness, but of course because of their members they are stronger than individuals. The [saddest] part of the Armenian political parties is that all their leaderships are corrupt. The question is, by whom? Who are the dark powers who are in a position to [influence] the Armenian political parties? The answer is, the same people like always and everywhere.
Nicolai Romashuk Hairabedian,11/14/08.
.
Armenia’s new Vasaks are now in action of a great black treason. When our president and the foreign Minister shamelessly declared that they are going to drop the issues of “Genocide” and “Occupied territories” from their negotiations, and in the mean time our so called political parties kept their silence, it shot my blood pressure up to the verge of having a heart attack!The way I see, all our political parties and denominations have sold their souls to the Satan, and our Diaspora to the Dollars. I am terribly worried but try to be somewhat upbeat. So long as we have dedicated patriotic people, there will be room for being optimistic. Remember that TRIUMPH comes from lots of TRY and UMPHs. Let’s not forget that during the black years of 1914-1915 the silent and inactive ones perished, whereas the active ones pulled through. May God bless you, and your family for undertaking your heavy and unappreciated burden. My late wife and my children have gone through all those hardship and sufferings, without expectation of any recognition and or appreciation, even from my ex own ARF party. What my family and I have done for our community during the past 46 years in Sydney, would be like a drop of rain in the ocean, compared to our various dedicated national heroes and patriots. In the past ARF was pointing fingers to Levon Ter Petrossian. But, “ Why the(ir) Silence and Inactivity” now?
Mack Vahanian, Sydney, Australia 11/13/08
Your article is a very simplistic analysis of the situation and generalizes extensively to fit its theme. If I had received this article right after the election, I would have given it some thought. This topic has already been exhausted post-election and many articles have been written around this topic. I would appreciate if we concentrated on issues our country faces at the moment, for example the financial crisis and the food crisis.
Etienne kechichian, 11/12/08

Thank you so much for a clear and unbiased picture of the situation in Armenia and a report of the organizations in Canada. I was not aware of those organizations. The Armenian communities have been too complacent following
leaderships, that should actually be criticized rather than following them blindly. The situation in Armenia is even worse with the human rights violations. This why the more educated generation has been alienated from those communities, at the expense of creating an honest and vibrant young community.
Betty Hagopian, Toronto, 11/11/08

Apathy towards recognized organizations? Is the government of Armenia part of these organizations? Was this the first fraudulent election?  Get real and be serious about your judgemental tone of discourse. Did you forget the 2000 US elections and the resulting 8 years of horror? We Armenians enjoy our independence of mind so much that we will not accept any opinion other than our own. We will not accept authority  under any form or shape. I will not delve myself to explain why we in the Diaspora and in our country are shaped like this; you probably  know it too well. Give the country and its government a chance.

Hratchia 11/11/08.
Where is the Beef?
You are obviously too long and too far from the actual Armenian political scene to understand how things are now done in Armenia, when you say "ultimately, it’s the authorities and people in Armenia that will decide what path will be drawn for the future".
The people of Armenia have absolutely no say in the development of Armenia, especially when it comes to matters regarding Armenia's neighbours, discussions of which are all conducted in secret by Sargsyan and his cronies, today namely Eduard Nalbandian and Tigran Sarkissian. Have no doubt that agreement on the Genocide commission has been reached in New York, and agreement on the surrounding territories has been reached, and if not already signed, will be signed immediately after the 15th October.
The plan to return the surrounding territories has been in preparation for several years, now compounded by the Genocide agreement, under pressure from Gul and Aliyev, who have long been working very closely together, knowing they can take advantage of Serzh’s greed. The Sargsyan regime, in close cooperation with Kocharian, will be picking up a minimum five Billion Dollars for their betrayal of the people of Armenia, and the Diaspora has not lifted a finger to stop them!!
Bruce  9/27/08

Politics or economics, is said, makes strange bedfellows. Question then remains: does Armenia need a strange bed fellow? Asking Turkey to remain neutral regarding Karabagh, is like pleading with a fox to preserve the integrity of the coop. Sooner or later temptation entices even the best disciplined wills; and Turkey is known to be a wily and willful wolf under the sheep's skin.
Armenia has already ceded to foreign marauders part of its vital resources. She doesn't need new devious carpet-beggars. Better keep your doors closed and sate yourself with your own "Pilaf", than open them wide, and be slowly poisoned by "Turkish Delight".
The Black Sea is still black, and let us be aware of the so-called "new" scholars. "Plus ça change, plus c'est le même", and Turkish historians no matter how "new" or enlightened, rather pander to their black side, than to illuminate the truth.
We, at the Diaspora, urge the leaders of Armenia to exercise good common sense and caution before they tread Turkey's murky détente proposals. Let us hope they try to find out ahead of time what sort of, or how many minarets Turkey has in mind to don with the Etchmiadzin.
Gomidas Jibelian, MS, PhD 9/17/08
A good, balanced article.
Sevan
 


Why I Cannot Be a Conservative

Viken insults the intelligence of Armenians with this dubious article. As someone who studied in  Czechoslovakia during the time when the country was under a brutal soviet fascist regime, Viken surprises me with his Michael Moorish nonsense that he spews. His arguments about the recent financial crisis in the US are totally rubbish. He purports the collapse of "fully" free markets as proof that the idea of individual freedom and self reliance are aberrations and not states of being we should  strive for. In other words let's have Big Brother take care of all of our needs since we the people have no thinking ability of our own and to hand over our individual rights to the elitists whose doctrines were sculpted by "heroes" such as Stalin, Trotsky, Lenin and in more modern times Castro and Chavez. Did he not read anything about the burden placed on the "free market" by the practice of socio-engineering enforced by organizations like ACORN with the full support of Democrats. All in the name of the "pulic good". I would not call radical actions such as death threats to bank managers and CEO's to force them to extend loans(mortgages) to high risk clients as an exercise in a free market. This was supposed to be for the public good. Well it sure didn't turn out that way as we now know all too well. That is why I cannot be a Liberal Fascist.
Dikran Piliguian, Toronto 10/24/08
I have recently read the comment of Mr. Dikran Piliguian on my essays. I would like to thank him for responding and making his voice be heard. He is certainly not indifferent. Here are my counterarguments:
1. Judging by the date of his comment, he has not read part III. All three pieces belong together and are meant to build the theoretical framework of analysis, from the more general to the more specific. Commenting on the whole before the work is complete is at best ill-advised. Mr. Avedis Kevorkian has made the same point that I am making. That would be like clapping, or in this case booing, after only one movement of a musical work is heard. If anything, it is a comment on the clapper and the booer, not the orchestra. Having said this, I would welcome Mr. Dikran Piliguian to build the counterargument to my position and to cite all the necessary examples and sources and let us have a good debate on the topic.
2. To the accusation that I have studied in Czechoslovakia, I plead guilty. The argument however that this somehow makes me a Stalinist or a Communist is more than flimsy. I have never hidden where I studied and in fact I have written about the experience in my blog. I have also studied (and taught) in France and have studied (and taught) in Canada (mainly Quebec, but also Manitoba). Does that make me a Gaullist or a follower of the Bloc Quebecois? Mr. Piliguian's argument would lead us to conclude for example that the numerous Armenians in various fields such as medicine, engineering, teaching and so on, who number in the thousands and have studied in Soviet Armenia and are now arguably in various positions of authority and leadership in the Diaspora are somehow all KGB moles and closet Stalinists. He is of course free to believe whatever he wants and I will defend his right to have that belief. But, if one agreed with Mr. Piliguian's line of reasoning, and along similar lines of argument, one should conclude that because someone studied in the US, for instance during the Vietnam war, that he/she somehow condoned that war, or worse even approved of the My Lai massacres.
3. Mr. Piliguian has obviously read what I write since he knows so much about me. My work is on public record, including my work for Armenian and non-Armenian human rights issues. I know who I am and what I have done and I have not changed much from the times I was in Czechoslovakia, or even earlier. At that time I was involved in defending the rights for freedom of expression of artists and writers in Communist Czechoslovakia. As a foreign student who enjoyed certain immunities (i.e. I could not be jailed, merely deported), I was involved in distributing the works of "banned" writers, which included Milan Kundera and Vaclav Havel, who later became the president of the Czech Republic after the Velvet Revolution. I can name names and give contacts who can back up my claim. Since he has turned this issue into an ad hominem attack against me equating me to fascists and defenders of Castro, Chavez, Stalin and Lenin, I would like to ask Mr. Piliguian as to how many times he has personally risked his own personal future and under what circumstances to defend anyone's individual freedoms which he oviously so cherishes? I will publicly salute him if he can do so, because it would mean that we believe in similar ideals.
4. As for the comparison with Michael Moore, I feel extremely flattered although I think it is somewhat unjustified. Again because his argument is completely faulty. He says and I quote " as someone who studied in Czechoslovakia during the time when the country was under a brutal soviet fascist regime, Viken surprises me with his Michael Moorish nonsense that he spews". So the logic is as follows, I studied in a country during a time when it was under a "brutal soviet fascist regime" (giving him the benefit of the doubt for the exaggeration in the qualifiers) so that somehow makes me complicit, yet I surprise him by spewing nonsense worthy of Michael Moore. So if I am a Communist/Fascist and presumably so is Michael Moore in his books, why is he surprised? How is this connection made? The logical conclusion simply cannot be derived from the initial premise. I do not know Mr. Piliguian's field of expertise, but he cannot have studied mathematical logic.
5. Since he is attributing Leninism, Trostkyism, Stalinism and many other "ism"s to me, I can only conclude that this is for name-calling purposes. Any serious reader who knows his material knows how far apart these "ism"s are. In the eye of Mr. Piliguian, they might be equally reprehensible, but that would be like accusing a defendant in a legal case of one major crime, when he might be guilty of another (or not). One would not want to suggest that Conrad Black is guilty of first degree murder, although he might be guilty of first degree fraud. And no, this is not simply a matter for lawyers to know about. I would also suggest that he has not read my text carefully or completely enough, because any reader will immediately spot how I feel about Stalinists and Communist ideologues (or, in general, about any ideologues).
6. Arguing that the real reason for the collapse of the global free markets is because there was forced lending to non-credit worthy homebuyers would be the equivalent to suggest that
a) that lower income individuals should not be borrowing, therefore, for example, institutions like the Grameen Bank should not exist and have somehow caused this global catastrophe
b) that the rampant financial risk "securitization" and issuing of dubious derivative instruments that were in turn "sliced/diced" into other types of financial paper and then resold for more profit into hedge funds and so on had absolutely nothing to do with what happened and
c) that in fact great floods (financial collapse) are not due to decisions to do away with flood barriers (regulations) but are caused because of them. As they say in Armenian, varbed kogheh dan dereh kogh geh haneh – a good thief, will make the victim look like the thief.
I will let the learned reader be the judge as to who would qualify as a fascist. I do not claim that Mr. Piliguian is one. Therefore I agree with him. He is neither a Liberal nor a Fascist.
He is however very angry. He should be. Keynes was proven right and Milton Friedman now stands as the "naked emperor". There is nothing that can change that reality.
One does not need to be a rocket scientist to guess which one of the above two was his favourite.
Paregamoren,
Viken L. Attarian, Montreal 12/9/08

Congratulations on your masterful presentation of Canadian Politics.An excellent study. Not to be missed.It is a pleasure to read your essays.
Jirair Dervishian 11/13/08
With his three part series "Why I cannot be Conservative" Viken Attarian establishes himself as one of the leading intellectuals of international calibre. Some claim to see the holes in donuts, others the donuts, but Viken sees the realities of the world that surrounds us and presents them in a brillant analysis.
Hagop Angaladian 11/12/08

As one who sees the holes in donuts but not the donut, and as one who likes to pick nits, permit me to comment on two statements made by Viken Attarian.
Although SENATOR Joseph McCarthy gave his name to a nasty period of American history, he had nothing to do with Hollywood and any alleged Communists there. That was the despicable work of the House [of Represenatives] Committee on Un-American Activities (HUAC)–which, incidentally, started life in the 1930s and whose remit was to seek out Fascists in America!
America was not "founded upon the toil of slaves." True, there was slavery in the South, but it was the industrial North and–after the Civil War–the slaveless country that built up the infrastructure that made the country great.
Before thinking of commenting on the essay, however, I would like to read the rest of the installments to see where he is going with his interesting premise(s).
Except, that is, to say that all change must be resisted. If the challenge to the status quo wins out, it means that which was defended had passed its usefullness. However, if the challenge fails, it means that the status quo was valid. Therefore, it is possible for a person to be a conservative on one issue and a progressive on another.
Avedis Kevorkian Philadelphia, PA, USA
10/11/2008
As the author of this three-part essay, I take every comment related to this work very seriously. Particularly any comment published by the remarkable writer Mr. Avedis Kevorkian of Philadelphia. I have, so far, not read anything from him that has been uninteresting. I therefore anxiously await his feedback on the whole of the work.
Now that all the parts of the essay have been pubished and they have been generating interesting feedback, here is my comment on his comment.
a) On the issue of McCarthyism and the HUAC, I stand corrected. Mr. Kevorkian is absolutely correct. Furthermore, as its name suggests, the HUAC was an institution of the House of Representatives (Congress), and McCarthy was a Senator. I do however want to state that without the era and the "inspiration" of McCarthyism, the HUAC would not have been able to do its despicable deeds. But, since the HUAC was a Standing House Committee long after McCarthy was gone, he should not be the sole accused of shouldering the blame of the period. After all the HUAC has had other notable names
associated with it, including Richard Nixon as one of its members. This was after all also the "coldest" of the periods of the Cold War.
b) Slavery is usually associated with the American South and Mr. Kevorkian is right. However, the time period that I am describing is much earlier, i.e. it is the period of about forty to fifty years after the founding of the USA and during the early to mid 19th century. There was absolutely slavery all over the US during that period. My references to the time period was not AFTER the Civil War, but several decades BEFORE the Civil War when the intellectual foundation of Conservatism was being forged.
For example, it is a well known fact that Thomas Jefferson, one of the most influential of the Founding Fathers and arguably one of the greatest of the US presidents, an intellectual giant of his time, was a slave owner, and in fact he owned several slaves. At best, he was ambivalent towards slavery.
c) He is also right that it is possible to be Conservative and Progressive in certain issues. In fact, I go to great lengths in Part II of my essay into explaining how that concept has historically applied very well to Canadian Conservative politics all the way into the late eighties of the twentieth century.
d) My main disagreement with Mr. Kevorkian is in his second to final point. That all change MUST be resisted, and sort of let the "best man win" attitude. By that token, Socrates was wrong and his poisoners were right; Giordano Bruno was wrong and the Inquisitionary zealots who burnt him at the stake were correct; Galileo was wrong and the Catholic dogma was right (until John Paul II admitted that Galileo was right after all – over 3 centuries later); Hitler was right for having successfully suppressed the Warsaw Ghetto uprising and so on. The conclusion of his argument, if taken to the very
end, is that "might makes right". I cannot accept that conclusion.
And I am certain and hoping, that once he thinks of it in this light, he would find it unacceptable as well.
Paregamoren
Viken L. Attarian, Montreal, 11/14/08

Again, With the Dancing; Or, Will We Never Learn?
I will only dance when I see their signature on the documents……

That's why my friend I am an honest and sincere Republican and an admirer of my dear friend G.W.Bush, who stood up to Putin in Georgia, whose favourite philosopher is Jesus Christ, and not Monika Lewinsky, nor Hussein. Turkey will only accept the facts by sitting down with us, not America, not Russia, but with us………and as the day came for us to be Azad Angakh, and showed to the entire world that the Yerakouyn, was , is and will always be the flag of Armenia, the day will come when Turkey will sit across the table with our Armenian leaders, and discuss the issues…..and among those will be the genocide, and God willing maybe [getting back] Mount Ararat ………Dreams can come true.
Vartkes Ehramdjian, 11/9/08

If I were Obama, and deciding whether to recognize the Armenian Genocide, I would consider and weigh the following:

Pro: It happened.
       I said during the campaign that it happened
       Other countries (France, Canada, etc.) have recognized it and have not been hurt economically
       There's an active pro-recognition Armenian lobby
       Genocide scholars and historians in genral would back the recogition. So would major media such as
       The New York Times, The Washington Post
       It could bring Armenia to the Western fold and stop Russian penetration at north of Georgia
       Armenia would make more geographical sense as the route to the Baku-Ceyhan pipeline.
       Turkey can't blackmail America since it needs America far more than America needs it. Turkey needs
       America especially to gain entry to the EU and for support on the Cyprus issue, and for economic, military
       assistance.
       The Congress would support it.

Con: Create hostility with Turkey and mild resentment from Moslems and Moslem countries
       Hundreds of major US companies exporting to Turkey or with factories in Turkey would
       lobby against it           
       Unions and the right-wing in America would claim loss of jobs and exports at a crucial economic time
       The Republicans would oppose it
       AIPAC and the other Israeli/Jewish lobbies would oppose it
       The State Department would oppose it  
       Radio talk show (almost all far right) would campaign against it
       Wall Street would be against it  
       It could push Turkey eastward or closer to Russia. Turkey is already suspicous of US because we have
       created a de facto Kurdistan in northern Iraq.
       Whose voice weighs heavier? that of 70-million plus Turkey or 8-million Armenians?

I am sure the pro and con lists can be made longer.
Jirair Tutunjian, Toronto 11/9/08
It's not how long you can keep a champagne in a fridge, but how old is your champagne (years) a good one can last 15 years. It's wrong to say the older it gets the better it is. The question is will you, one day, open that bottle. wishful but hopeful, as Obama's logo hope is coming?

I always like reading you.
Antranik Chaderjian, Mississauga,ON 11/9/08
Karabakh Under the Hammer
I was particularly disappointed and disgusted to read Bruce Tasker's 2 pieces as I have known him from  around 1999 and have met him a few times in Yerevan. He is married to a local Armenian girl. He has told me he "came to Yerevan after the earthquake with Assistance" but has stayed behind. It’s a pity that even after 20 years of living in Armenia he speaks very little or no Armenian – and especially that he makes constant (proud?!) references to this fact in both his pieces. Apart from the extremely low quality of the work and the lack of any journalistic or analytical merit (reducing it to, in my view, hallucination, broad unfounded generalisations, speculations, hostile sniping at, cynicism and mockery of Armenia) his tone and entire language, not to mention his essentially anti-Armenian/pro Azeri (subconscious?) mind and sentiments, for someone who’s lived in the country for nearly 20 years and is supposed to be pro-Armenian (but not necessarily pro Armenian government) is mind-boggling. His reference throughout his “articles” to President Sargsyan  as “Serge”, in particular, is utterly unprofessional, preposterous and, in my view, arrogant and unacceptable. However for Geghart to publish it without any critical commentary, it just blows your mind out!
Bagrad Nazarian, London, 11/7/08
Armenia Slides In Global Corruption Rankings
The Kocharian government's Poverty Reduction Program and related legistlation was a sham. At the time, the government was under a lot of pressure and tried to appease the EU. Fast forward. So many years later, Armenia sliding down the Global Corruption Scale is no surprise either. The only light at the end of the tunnel seems to be the latest case about some southern officials, who were accused of stealing 1.2 Million US Dollars from the sate allocated funds for infrastructure.
According to the media, the whole department is charged and will be tried for graft and corruption and this time, the government seems to be serious. I hope that, charges laid will be successfully prosecuted and all parties found guilty will be punished with the full force of the law.
Haig Misakyan, Toronto
10/11/2008
Why? Why? Why?
These why? why? why? concerns have bothered most of us for many years. You had the foresight to crystalize them vividly. The real puzzle however is HOW? HOW and HOW? and by WHO? WHO? and WHO? Short of an action plan with tangible measures we will continue to spin our wheels. Please send me your e-mail address.

Hovsep Torossian, Detroit 4/2/08

America's Election
Avedis Kevorkian's passionate piece teaches us all, that in a democracy, we only get what we deserve as a collective. In a democracy, we lose because of our inactions, complacency and sometimes just plain laziness.
Democracy is messy, inefficent, it takes up a lot of our personal time, it requires us to engage our minds, it requires critical thinking, as well as analyses of issues, an engaged citizenry that is informed through a variety of diverse sources and more than an altruistic sense of the public good. In other words, to function, it requires a complex machinery that has many parts that need to work together. If one part fails, the whole thing can come crumbling down.
That is why a democracy is very vulnerable. That is also why a democracy is resilient. It takes a lot of blows to dismantle it.
On the other hand, we might have reached rock bottom and we might have too many broken pieces already.
Democracy has nothing to do with economics and commercial utilitarian choices, nor is it about market systems, like the grand "strategist"s of an uncontrolled and globally rampant approach based on greed will have you believe. After all democracy was invented by the Greeks in antiquity when none of these constructs existed. You don't believe me? Look at China and Russia and their market economies of today. Quod Erat Demonstrandum.
Market systems, at best (i.e. when they are honest and fairt, based on principles and regulations put in by the citizens) can only pursue efficiency and maximize the wealth of shareholders. At their worst, i.e. like right now, they pursue the same goals but use fraud, greed and other shady or downright illegal means to achieve them. Therefore, the sole distinction between the two, is only in the method, not the objective.
While I disagree that the Catholicos is elected by the people (or by their representatives), since I do not recall anyone ever asking my opinion about the Catholicossal candidates (perhaps because I am a baptized Catholic, but I know many Lousavortchagans who are in the same predicament), Avedis is right on about us having only ourselves to blame, whether as an Armenian, an American or as a Canadian. We can make choices about supporting ideas and a specific vision vs. supporting names based on tribal habits or because we want to protest a position we disagree with (like granting equal rights to women, immigrants, blacks, gays or whatever other group might be the target of our own intolerance).
There are many things done in our name. Including horrendous crimes such as fraud, embezzlement, murder, and even massive crimes against humanity.
Choosing to be silent makes us all complicit. Avedis Kevorkian is calling on all of us not to be.
And I thank him and his father for that.
Viken L. Attarian Mount Royal Quebec, CANADA
10/3/08
Armenian Genocide Issue Should Not Become A Political Football

Harout Sassounian clearly underestimated Sargsyan’s determination to establish the Genocide Commission, and to return the Karabakhi surrounding territories, and indeed it now seems Karabakh. In this article Harout emphasizes the political aspect of this action, which is of course important. But previously Harout was one of the few who attended to the financial benefits for the Armenian Republic, which is of course the prime priority for the Sargsyan / Kocharian regime.
The events in Georgia now influence events in the region, and Sargsyan has used that situation to bring his long-awaited plan to full implementation, and that will be initiated this week at the UN in New York.
Holocaust could cost 200 billion Dollars – Genocide Going for FREE
http://www.khosq.com/en-us/article/2008/09/23/holocaust_could_cost_americans_200_billion_dollars
Still Blowing the World Bank Whistle in Washington in the fight against corruption in Armenia
http://better-not-wb-the-wb.blogspot.com/
Bruce Tasker, Yerevan, 9/24/2008
Diasporan Money Corrupts Governments, Study Finds
Why do you bother to post any articles from Ara Baliozian or Avedis kevkorian? Both are super pessimistic, and jump at the chance to disrespect and throw dirt on Armenia and Armenians who support Armenia in the latters case. You claim this is done in order to better understand our situation, but in reality it only makes some less informed Armenians believe the rubbish and anti Armenian musings of these two misguided figures.
Ara tries to compare himself with the great Armenian writers, and since he is no where close to them he decides to hate the worldwide Armenian community, plus regurgitate the same mis-thoughts over and over again. While Avedis thinks he is looking out for Armenia by being so harsh he is actually only showing himself to be naive and overly critical. He thinks that since overnight Armenia didn't become the Switzerland of the region or that democracy hasn't been perfect or the big difference between the rich and poor of Armenia, that the Diaspora should punish Armenia by not helping it out. Well, that is like UN sanctions, it only hurts the common person, not the government.
And FYI, democracy doesn't even truly exist in America. We saw how Bush stole the election, and we see how democratic it is to always have to choose between the lessor of the two evils. I am of course referring to the two party system in the U.S. Excuse my language, but Republicans and Democrats are the same [… ] from different […]. About as much difference between them as there was among the bolsheviks and mensheviks. Also, the IMF study he pointed to is nice and all but does he realize that the IMF is another instrument of western (read) American hegemony and it was due laregly to the absurd policies of the World Bank and IMF that Russia was more or less run by crooks during the 90s, that Argentina was in deep economic trouble before they basically told the IMF where to stick it in 2001?
As for Avedis' comment about his homeland being here, if he means the U.S. or Canada then great, but stay the hell out of Armenia's affairs, if you do not view it as your country then do not criticize those who do view Armenia as their home.
If you can't stop posting the works of either of these two, at least do many of us a favor and begin to post the writings of Dr. Armen Ayvazyan, please! I would then maybe see the point of having Ara's or Avedis' writings, because the reader could at least see the lack of vision either of these men have.

Vilen Khlgatyan 9/25/08

Avedis Kevorkian only touches the surface. Avedis is absolutely right, remittances from the Diaspora are a central part in the corruption equation, and since the recent election , which he also rightly refers to as a farce, remittances have gone up dramatically, some estimate to between 2 and 3 billion dollars each year. Not only does this relieve the Government from their obligation to spend public funds on the public, as they should, it also provides spending power for the public to buy goods that are monopolized by Government cronies.
Moreover, with respect to the IMF (and the World Bank), Diaspora remittances help Very Nicely Thank You with the economic boom Armenia has apparently experienced through the Kocharian / Sargsyan years. If it was not for this massive per capita income, the Armenian economy would have collapsed long ago.
Bruce Tasker, Yerevan, 9/23/2008
Hello, Your article has been featured on Khosq.com (A new Sharing & Digging Site for Armenians) at http://khosq.com/en-us/article/2008/09/22/diasporan_money_corrupts_governments_study_finds
You can register with Khosq.com and share interesting and important articles and help promote your favourite ones so that it reaches broader audiences.
Best Wishes,
Garen – The Khosq.com Team – Yerevan, 9/23/2008
"Collapse" And How It Relates To Things Armenian
Your writing is always very interesting.
Shayen (Sahen) Tuntoglu 8/31/08

First the Genocide, Then the Vericide
President Sargsyan can no longer deceive the Armenian people, Turkey's Foreign Minister Ali Babacan confirmed that development in Turkey-Armenia and Azerbaijan-Armenia relations are expected after the Azerbaijani elections Oct. 15.
You can translate the development in Turkey-Armenia relations as the establishment of diplomatic ties and opening the borders and the development in Azerbaijan-Armenia relations as the progress in the solution of the Karabakh issue. The Foreign Minister announced that he would join Armenian Foreign Minister Nalbandian and Azerbaijani Foreign Minister Memetyarov in a tripartite meeting Friday in New York. Tomorrow we will witness a "first" in New York. Turkey-Armenia-Azerbaijan foreign ministers will meet together to iron out bilateral relations and to eliminate the dire strait in the Caucasus.
Bruce Tasker 9/25/08
The Caucasian Zimbabwe Makes it Personal (almost)
Since the operative word is "disgusting" in this essay, I shall liberally use it. Quite frankly I find it disgusting that "activists" seem to forget that such a sanction against Armenia is likely to further harm the general population and not the thugs in power. [….] In the liberal self-aggrandizement of a bone-headed "activist" is where we shall find such drivel. Even if a  thousand youth were beaten by 999 thugs, we have no right to call for sanctions against Armenia. Such obtuse minds need to do what is best for all of us: They need to stay the hell out of this matter altogether!
Hagop 8/29/08

Jirayr Sefilyan And Bigotry
There were tens of thousands of soldiers who fought for independence and Artsakh, thousands of them are driven to misery, and hundreds of them were exiled. How it comes that Diaspora reacts so strong only in one particular case? Only because Jirayr is a "Diasporan"? Do you think that is is OK to deport and annihilate "Hayastantsi" Armenians, but it is not OK in case of a "Diasporan". Where do you see the difference?
Vahe Avetian 8/1/08
Welcoming And Not Confronting (Comments in Armenian)
Hargeli hayer,
Arjanavor hay Tigrann stegtsel e hoyakap saite @[email protected], aysinqn gegecikn patrast e; Duq grum u kardum eq voch hayeren, vorn stegtsvel e miliardavor tariner arag: Es shat nyuter em ugarkel USA-i hayerin, hayeri lragirnerin, hnkerutyunnerin , nshelov, vor “irencic indz vochinch petq che”: Bayc miayn anbanneri lrutyann em vka egel:
Ekeq miasin xndrenq “GEGARD”-in , vor na bac ani mi dzri elektronayin post mer kogmic ugarkvats, hayeren tarerov grvats nyuteri faylern ev mi dzri elektronayin post, voum klinen mer ugarkats faylern (miayn arogj mardu arogj mtqerov) hayeren u bolors el k#kardanq cankacats fayln hayeren, qani vor kimananq posti gagtnagirn:
Guce bolors miasin ognenq “GEGARDIN” u ksksenq hayeren mtatsel sovorel:
Minchev ays mitqn irakanacneln es karog em im kogmic grvats haeren nyutern ugarkel dzer hasceneron – tpagrats, skavarakov, hamaspyurov:
Es hayeri het toneci AMANOR-I 12005 amyakn, isk duq? Sovoreq tsaxselu hachuyqn zgal, miasin qef anel tekuz hamaspyurov, hazar tari cheq aprelu:
Es angam aryan rak el em bujel, chnayats injener gitnakan em: Dimeq angam voroshaki hivandutyam bujman harcov, kognem, ete karoganam:
Hratarakum em hayeren “MTORUM” ev (herti e) “LSENQ IRAR” lragir – prakner: Duq el miaceq hayeren lezvov (tekuz masamb) mshakuytayin lragir stegtsel aranc radioyi, heracuyci, tegakan u ayl erkrneri lragreri nyuteri artatpman GEGARD- i gekavarutyyamb u boloris cankutyamb:
Es kkazmem lragir – praki elektronayin tesqn, PDF fayln u kugarkem Dzes skavarakn tparanin handznelu hamar , kmasnakcem naev dramov, ete duq chkaroganaq lriv havaqel 200 kanach hratarakman saxsn:
Hargeli Hayer vor hayn khaskana nerqevum bervats votanavori tesqov bervats mitqn u hogin otar lezvov targmanvats?
* * *
Chanpic ekats hognats quyrik
hangist qich ar mer motin,
snund ara qo poqrikin
u qund ar mer mahchin:
Ashxarhn mets, mardiq el shat
qez pes paxats xur kyanqic,
mez inch mi neg` qeznov ekats
ays len u bol ashxarhin:
Qnir hangist, du, mer mahchin,
mer tunn el halal lini,
guce kyanqid, balid chanpen
mer tanic noren kelni:
* * *
Haykakan asacvatsq
Tsar# tsur petq che aci,
vor armatnin cav chta,
ira ambogj qashi ujov
nranc tanjanq mi chta:
Aydpisin# qamuc shat shut
arnatahan klini u ansnund kmna,
armatiqn el aranc vordu
miayn chor payt kdarnan:
Lav e tsar#` teq bardzracats
shat vag qamuc kotrvi,
armatnerin vnas chta u nor tsil# kyanq ani`
ugig gtsov misht bardzrana,
armatnerin el uj ta:
Tsar u armat snund karnen
hogic, odic u jric,
mez el lav shuq u maqur od
misht el barevov kanen:
Tsar tnkelis ushim egeq,
vor hankarts tsur chgna,
armatnerin u mer kyanqin
miayn kyanq u jpit ta:
****
Erb vor Dzes HAY kzgaq, imac tveq, miasin kuraxananq, te che hayelin dzes inch asi? Hajogutyun bolorid kyanqi amen eganakin: Apreq urax irar uraxutyamb:
A. K.Aslamazyan, E mail – < [email protected] > Yerevan 9/4/2008
Other
Thank you for hosting this page. I appreciate all the work that goes into it.
Would it be possible to have a "Printer Friendly" option for those who would prefer to read a hard copy of the great articles you have?
Just a suggestion.
John
8/16/2008
Dear John,
Your suggestion is very timely. New featrures are introduced to the site every now and then. Hopefully the printer-friendly option will be implemented in the near future.

Thank You.

The Keghart.com Team

The Caucasus moment

The USA in my opinion does not want peace to keep our war machine going. Why do they want a missile shield around Russia? US is starting cold war, not Russia. Can you imagine Russia putting some missile bases in Cuba? We would do in our pants. Why was US silent  when initially Georgians attacked on South Ossetia? Is it because they are allies of US and can get away with it, killing women and children, raping, plundering houses? Where was our lyer leader Bush? Playing golf?
It's the same with our ally Israel getting all the military hardware to kill and destroy Palestine and Lebanon. What have these countries done to USA?  It's not right when Russia retaliates, but it's all right for US to invade Iraq.
Robert C. Paul (Poghossian)  8/20/08

Excellent article by a top, qualified politician.
Andre Chaderjian 8/31/08
The Drive to Secede: Georgian Provinces Likely to Join Russia
…. I don't think Russia will go to War until the next U.S. President gets elected "If this persists" which I doubt. United States is showing no respect to its adversary … When Russia was using Satellites to spy on U.S. America was sending planes, actors, writers, etc to spy on Russia. [Although] Russia had economic problems in late 80's and early 90's the military operations were ongoing and U.S knows this.
I reside in the United States and would not live anywhere else. I think people should have more freedom to choose what their taxes are being spent on and who we should go to War with if necessary, because it's quite obvious that the White House wants to spend money for relief purposes and on nothing else.
All this tension will pass when the White House starts taxing citizens and borrowing money from other countries.
Zhan Barsegyan, USA
8/21/2008
I was laughing at one of McCain's rhetoric demanding Russia to withdraw in order to still be part of the civilized nations. Where was America when the Russian Empire under Catherine the Great was running the whole place?
Lamoushka, Florida
8/20/2008
The war between the Russians and President Mikheil Saakashvili reminds me the cat and mouse game. How childish the Georgian President looks creating a mess for his country.
The Georgian President played Russian roulette with his own people, and the only help he gets is verbal ammunition from the West.
I hope Mr. Ter Petrosian finds out why Armenians outside the country did not support him as much as he wanted. Mr. Saakashvili and Mr. Ter Petrosian both are individuals who can be very dangerous for their own people; both are day dreamers and like color revolutions. Most hunters never pull the tail of a bear in deep sleep. It is a dangerous game.
Grish Begian, Toronto
8/19/2008
It's nice to read common sense articles among so much brain-washed clone regurgitations of lies.

The most glaringly obvious fact of our times is that the most powerful empire of Mammon has always attacked, all over the world, only the weak–therein lies its enormous but coward character matching its enormous terrorising power. During the World War II it entered during the last couple of years, after the crucial battle of Stalingrad. During WW I, despite its Ambassador's (Morgenthau) numerous communications concerning the Genocide of the Armenians in the Ottoman empire, it chose 'non interference', hence letting the butchers finish their job. No wonder our master poet Tcharents used to remind us that yes America might help us–it will help us open modern orphanages…

Hence, let's hope Diplomacy will prove more powerful than terrorising cowardice which abuses others to do its dirty job.

Meanwhile and after the courageous dismantling of the Warsaw Pact by the 'Russian bear', the bosses of 'free' Warsaw are chaining their fate with NATO Big Boss, opening the Pandora Box of nuclear genocide–NATO has now the nuclear first attack 'preventive' policy enshrined in its main objectives– while the non aligned nations, counting ca 120 nations, unanimously voted, including Iran,(and not for the first time) for a nuclear free Middle East…asking the Nuclear Non Proliferation watchdogs to deal with Israel's nuclear arsenal…

Khatchatur UK 8/20/08

Truth Was The First Casualty
Sireli Avedis,
Mi housahadir verche pari e.
Zohrab Atarian, Fresno
8/22/2008
A very refreshing analysis.
Andre Chaderjian, Canada
8/22/2008
Well, I have been clamoring everywhere that Armenians need to have a first-class top-notch diplomat, ready to expose the hypocrisy of the West and deal with it accordingly. Our mistake is to be always too harsh in our good deeds. In this World, you have to play a Game, and you have to know how to play it! That is what the Armenians need. That is the only way for us, Armenians, not to lose!
George Y. Krikorian, Orlando, FL
8/20/2008
Thanks for these articles. It was particularly refreshing to finally see an Armenian perspective. Had Georgia been successful, I wonder whether Azerbaijan would have been tempted to try to pull the same stunt in Nagorno-Karabakh?

Phil Brown, Nepean, Ontario, Canada 8/19/2008

A Wake Up Call to the Caucasian Armenians

I like meeting up with my perceptive friends for a cup of tea in a London cafe. And when that friend does not even … live in London, then I enjoy finding him in KEGHART, which in a remarkably short (very!) time has become one of the most un-missible publications on the global Internet – thanks of course to its Founder-Editor Dikran Abrahamian, obviously a most impressive Armenian intellctual….
I like exceedingly Avedis Kevorkian's coinage of VERICIDE – it deserves to be made a conceptual term of! with the proviso of a slight scholarly semantic emendation. "Vericide" etymologically derives from the Latin noun Veritas=truth, and the verb caedere=to kill; thus the ellision produces the meaning of "The Murder of Truth" (NOT "the death of truth" as Avedis has it)-
And better still, "The Genocide of the Truth" – very apposite to the "Lies, lies and damned Lies" (Disraeli's words), and the ENDLESS lies fabricated DAILY nowadays (on everything, and not only politcs!) in the Western newsmedia …
People who love lies love BO – Lies "stink up to heaven" (Claudius in Shakespeare's Hamlet)- Lies are turning our lives into raw sewage … A hundred years ago, before the British Victorians solved London's "The Big Stink" problem caused by the open sewage poured into the London river Fleet, prisoners in the neighbourhood prisons used to drop … dead of the Stink (before the Judges' rope got to their necks …) Soon, honest American citizens will drop dead in the streets, shocked by the stinking lies they are fed round the clock!
And finally, I wish somebody (Viken Attarian? Dikran Abrahamian? even Avedis Kevorkian?) could enlighten us why O why the Eastern Armenians have been so negligent in re-claiming their historical lands of Javakh-k and Nakhichevan (as they did Artsakh, thank God!) amidst the Caucasian Chaos – the boiling pot there is painfully but refreshingly steaming out the historical grime (not to say the deliberate genocidal filth) accumulated over the geophysical territorial errors of the Stalinist past …
Are the Caucasian Armenians in torpor, or too busy tearing each other apart like mafia-wolves for indecent Dollars, instead of acting in self-defence against their genocidal enemies …
There is every sign that the Caucasian pot shall go on boiling violently for a while, because of american neo-con politics.
Armenians of Javakh-k and Nakhichevan get cracking … find Khrimian Hairik's "iron ladel" instead of pursuing hopeless Petitions … and devalued Dollars!
Professor Hovhanness I. Pilikian, London
8/20/2008
Response to Prof. H. I. Pilikian

First, permit me to thank Prof. H. I. Pilikian for pointing out that “Vericide” is really the “Murder of Truth,” not the “Death of. . . .”  It doesn’t change the argument that the term be used, but it makes its use more precise.

As to the professor’s other comment that someone (he listed me among the someones) doesn’t explain why the Eastern Armenians have failed to claim the Armenian lands of Javakh (in Georgia) and Nakhitchevan (in Azerbaijan).

The answer is simple: No one gives a damn about the Armenians and, by extension, their “cause” and their grievance(s).

We saw what happened when the matter of the destruction of the cemetery at New Julfa was brought to the attention of the Council of Europe, of which Armenia and Azerbaijan are members.  The CoE did not condemn or otherwise criticize Azerbaijan but asked BOTH sides to respect the cultural heritage of the other!  Under American pressure, world bodies must pair Armenia and Azerbaijan and treat the two countries as a duality.  You will recall that Armenia’s admittance to the CoE was held up until Azerbaijan could be deemed to be eligible.  And, of course, USELESSCO, based in Paris, has done nothing.

Thus, any claim by Armenia for Nakhitchevan–now without Armenians and without any trace of their presence–would get nowhere.

As to Javakh, Prof. Pilikian may have a point, except that the hypocrites who govern the organizations that determine these things and “recognize” the rights of peoples take their lead from America, and America–as recent events have shown–feels it needs Georgia as a client state and would not permit any organization to even listen to an appeal, much less find in favor of the Armenians.

An Israeli friend once said to me, “If only God had given the Arabs the land of milk and honey and had given us the oil, things would be different.”  In the same vein, it can be said that “If God had given the Azeris the apricots and had given Armenia the oil, things would be different.”

No, Professor, do not criticize the Eastern Armenians for not starting an effort that is doomed to failure.

Avedis Kevorkian, Philadelphia, PA
8/27/2008
Language, Beauty & Memory Part III & IV
Viken, you are incredible. When I emigrated to Canada from Bolis, I had Raffi's Ghente, Khatchakoghi Hishadagarane and Gaydzere in my luggage and some other treasured books that I brought with me. Needless to say that half of the weight of my luggage were my books and the rest some clothing staff. To date, I keep my books. They are inseparable part of my soul.
Everytime I read your comments or articles, I learn something new or remember things, that for some reason or other had been left buried in a dark corner of my brain.
It is truly a pleasure to read your contributions. Please keep them coming.
Haig Misakyan, Toronto
6/2/08

I Fulfilled Your Words – Reliving Saroukhan
Once again, Hagop Angaladian shines with an amazing piece. Like a present Baronian and Odian
combined, he does not shy away from controversy and points the satirical finger at the modern day
khatchakoghs and their allies.

Angaladian transforms his personal tragedy into an awe-inspiring conviction. Reviving the famous
Saroukhan caricaturial volume of Des Khoskeret (See Your Words), he masterfully uses his own life-and-
death struggle into nothing short of a revolt against fate. Those who actually wish that he might go
away are in for a surprise.

The revolting behaviour of our latter day fraudsters has at least one redeeming value. It has given
us a new author.

And that is something very rare indeed.

Viken L. Attarian
Town of Mount Royal, QC Canada
5/31/09
A Loss of Balance on Israel
In her mini-essay, “A Loss of Balance on Israel,” Linda McQuaig shows that she, too, has lost her balance.
She is correct when she says that Canada (and, indeed, the rest of the UN majority in 1947) voted for two states in Palestine, and that Canada (and the rest of the UN majority) didn’t vote for what now exists in Palestine.
However, she, like all those who comment on the present situation (with a tinge of anti-Israel in their comments), fails to discuss the genesis of the present situation.
A good place to start would be to ask the question: “What would the situation in Palestine be like if the Arab nations did not make war on israel, in May 1948?”
There would be two UN-created states–one Jewish and one Arab. Jerusalem would belong to no one. The Jews, being Jews, would make their state what it is today–desert land now fertile land, an agricultural society now an industrial state, a backward land now a leader in science and technology.
There would be no refugee camps–which are a creation of the Arabs. The Arabs living in the israeli state would enjoy the benefits of Jewish progress.
What the apologists for the Arabs–the term “Palestinian” for the those in the camps was created after 1967–fail to concede is that the monster that exists was created by the Arabs.
For possibly the first time in (recent) world history, a displaced people–ignoring for the moment why they are displaced–could have gone to countries where they were familiar with the customs, the language, the mores, the religion, and could have been absorbed in an environment with which they were familiar. Unlike other displaced people who had to go to a hostile (unkind, not warlike) environment where they had to adopt to new customs, learn a new language, adjust to a majority religion. Think of the Armenians; think, Yes, of the Jews.
But, the Arab nations created the refugee camps–not Israel–so that the poor people who were encouraged to leave could be used as pawns in a cynical political game to make the Jews the villains. Probably, Saudi Arabia’s one-day’s oil income could make a paradise somewhere in the vast empty lands in the area for all the Arab refugees now living in the camps. But, the oil-rich Arab nations prefer to ignore their brothers and sisters, their co-religionists, and ratchet up the conflict and lay that conflict at the feet of Israel.
But, all the “what could have been” is conveniently forgotten, and people like Linda McQuaig lament for those who have caused the problem without suggesting that it is a self-imposed problem.
If tears are to be shed, shed them for the death of Truth.
Avedis Kevorkian, Philadelphia, PA
5/27/2008

Language, Beauty and Memory Part I & II
Viken, you beat both of them at their game. I truly enjoyed it.
Haig Misakyan, Toronto
5/24/2008
On The Armenian Love-Language
It is always a great joy to read Viken Attarian wherever one can encounter him – and I am glad nowadays he is frequently to be found at Keghart – not only for his content, but for sheer style – the guy writes so elegantly, as if English were his mother-tongue – one of a few Armenian intellectuals globally, who can beat the English at their linguistic games.
I do not wish to outrage any traditional Armenian 'holier than thou' Readers, by … playing chess with Armenian scientific Semantics – puns and linguistic games cannot and must not be inhibited by 'morality' etc.
Inspired by VA's highly original punning of 'srpa-zan-ts', I would like to record 'srpan' – the Armenian literary word for 'anus', which is a very beautiful Armenian construct from the verb 'srpe(h)l' meaning 'to wipe (off)' – which I think is, believe it or not, incredibly, the very same root for 'sourp' meaning 'sacred', viz. 'cleansed from all sins'!
Some of the precise Armenian equivalents of what is generally regarded as obscene in other languages, are of pristine beauty among the roots of the Armenian semantics – and we Armenians are the poorer for not employing them in civilized discourse.
For example, the Armenian word for F*** is one of the most beautiful and apposite among all Indo- European languages – 'kou-ne(h)l' derives from the root/verb 'kna-nal' meaning 'to sleep' (also in English polite discourse – 'to sleep together'), which in turn is cognate with the verbal root 'k-nal' meaning 'to go' (curiously, a metaphor in English for F***, stretching back to Elizabethans and even possibly further back to Chaucer), 'to wander off'… to sleep.
The Armenian words for the sexual organs is another case for lingusitic beauty – I have not worked out the etymology of the very beautiful word 'bou-ts' for the vulva, but I have no doubt whatsoever that the Armenian word for the male sexual organ 'g-lir' derives from 'g-lor' meaning 'round', the very literal illustration of the testicles, which in ancient lore was regarded to be of a single entity.
The discovery that 'it' was actually constituted of two 'eggs' was practically a 'modern' medical find – it may be argued that Leonardo da Vinci was the first discoverer of this fact, as a direct result of his anatomical studies based on the dissection of cadavres.
I better stop, before risking traditional Armenian ire exploding upon your Editorial heads – Christian Armenian ultra-nationalists think a true Armenian should lack any sexual organs …
Professor Hovhanness I. Pilikian
London, UK
5/17/2008

April 24 Triptych

Hagop Angalatian's "April 24 Triptych" is surely a shiny example of modern Armenian writing, which proves once again that, in spite of all the naysayers, language is the most important concept that relates itself to the Armenian identity. Even more, Angalatian appears as an author with a unique style that brings freshness and a call for a national awakening, without falling into the romanticism of a hopeless sentimentality.  It is not a sentimentality but instead, a sensitivity that, in turn,  works through the intellect, thus opening the reader's mind to new possibilities.

Angalatian's work is surely the result of the deeply-felt experiences of the cosmopolitan chronicler, but also a manifestation of his deeply-rooted Armenian identity.  In fact, it is the universal monument to the creators of that idenity, his parents and his teachers.

Viken L. Attarian, Mount Royal, QC Canada
Hi, A fellow Armenian Family History researcher pointed me to your website and this article. Very  unfortunately for me, I don't read Armenian! Don't suppose there's an English translation is there? I am interested particularly in the pictures and comments regarding the Armenian Church in Dhaka in the article. I have recently photographed and transcribed all the Armenian graves from this church,they can be seen on my website www.chater-genealogy.com, so your article has sparked my interest.

Many thanks and best wishes.
Liz 5/17/08
Commemoration of the 93rd Anniversary of the Genocide of Armenians in Istanbul
I salute the commemoration of the Genocide of Armenians in Istanbul. It is a wise and courageous step to have the Turkish intellectuals get involved to know the true history of the region.
I, a son of the Genocide survivor feel myself a Native of this country now called Turkey. My Armenian ancestors were
living here more than three thousand years; it's proven historically, culturaly and relegiously. All history books of neighbouring countries recognise Old Armenia from Mt. Ararat to the Mediterranean Cilicia.
It is about time for honourable educated Turks to recognise that the Armenians were the original people of this country and stop denying the Genocide for the benefit of our two peoples to live together in harmony in future.
Bablan Oghlo, Urfa, Turkey
4/28/08
This is impressive. Astvadz hokinere lousavoreh.
Hye 4/30/08

A Tribute to Vartan Oskanian
I know him personally since 1983. Nobody is denying Mr.Okanian's value as a diplomat; but his mildness in response to the destruction of the Nakhichevan Khatchkars was reproachable. A prime occasion was lost by not suing Azerbaijan and asking billions of Euros in the Hague International Court. At the same time it would have given an opportunity to demonstrate that before annexation of Nakhijevan 60% of the population was Armenian, whereas today only 0.1%.
Souren Dermelkonian, Montreal 4/28/08.
Tribute to Ambassador John Evans
Dear Berge

I read your article with interest.
I agree that Mr Evans is an ambassador of Armenia in USA.
But forgive me to my question as many possible groups are in my mind, but who is the other group that
missed this meeting?
The way it looks, all who did not attend this meeting must have lost a good event.

Regards,

Ara Nahabedian
High Doon, England, UK
4/28/08

Very nice article.
A question bothers me. What would have happened if "Hai Gedron" invited such an important guest? Would we have had the same picture in the hall (Catholic, Evangelical, semi-apostolic…)? Most probably there would be a really full capacity to be proud of.
Is this really the organizers' fault? Should they change their advertising strategies, their organizing behaviors? Should they involve Gedron’s people to work together in such critical events. Will they?!!
How strong is the relation between the organizers (Diocese, AGBU, World Alliance)? Has each group done its best to advertise and organize members to attend such an important event? Or are they doing this to show the other half that they CAN do, …or have some photos with his excellency in their albums and a microphone for some jocularity…?
V A
4/22/08
Montreal also hosted Mr. Evans on Saturday April 19th. Again, the attendance was anemic and again we blame everyone- them, they, the others, semi, hemi… for not being present at a memorable event honoring Mr. Evans. There are emails going back and forth between individuals trying to ask why. There are many explanations.
My question is, where was a certain Bishop during the Montreal honoring of Mr. Evans? Or today at the Requiem Mass for Armenian Genocide Victims ! April 24 is a very important day for all Armenians. Our Bishop has decided to take a group of people to tour Jerusalem , some say fot pilgrimage (just to quote from their own web site and their publicity campaign)
I really wonder where this meets the pilgrimage concept: 'The cost of the Easter pilgrimage from Montreal or Toronto is just $3,399 per person. Price includes roundtrip airfare, first-class hotels in Jerusalem, daily breakfast and dinner, and guided sightseeing. Jerusalem, Bethlehem, Sea of Galilee, Nazareth, Capernaum, Upper Room, Megiddo, Qumran, Via Dolorosa, Garden of Gethsemane, Haifa, Mt. Carmel, Caesarea by the Sea…. '
Of all 52 weeks of the year, he has decided to be absent from his community on such an important date ! Now, instead of blaming people, let us look and examine the behavior of some of our leaders. I want to clarify that there are some who do deserve and should be respected ; however, as Dr. Minassian mentioned in his email and I quote him : ' his jocularity, in this solemn gathering ' is probably the answer why this certain Bishop takes April 24 so lightly….
Respectfully,
A concerned Armenian
4/22/08
Dr. Berge Minassian,
I met Ambassador Evans in Yerevan. I read what you wrote in Keghart several times to find the correct comment to make. I understood very well what you meant; I do not agree with you that we hate each other; no, we are just not united. I remember a few years ago when an Armenian centre would instruct its youth not to walk into Ottawa carrying the Armenian flag with its tri-colors on April 24; but now that is history, and we all honor the same flag. My point is that there is hope for us .
Regards,
Vrejouhy
4/22/08
Letter to the Right Honourable Serzh Sargsyan, Prime Minister of Republic of Armenia
Instead of sending these useless emails that REALLY have no impact because of our own people's apathy…WHY dont you or keghart (or who ever it is that you are representing) DO something (can be anything from fund raising/awareness/ like the jewish kibutz) that is more practical and hands on and actually dedicate your time and effort to really help Armenia and or Armenians in the diaspora. Maybe then I will care and help you myself… Otherwise stop sending me these emails that I don't even get a chance to read.

Thanks
Linda Kassabian
4/3/08

Keep up the good work.  Let the Canadian Armenians raise their voices louder.  Apostle Paul said that if the citizens are not awake and do not protest to the abuses of their rulers, their rulers will take advantage and will trample upon their god given rights.  
I was in Yerevan last October and the cab driver showed us a huge compound and asked if we knew anything about it.  He retorted that this building is a den for "…. tsakeri".  This was the parliament building….   That's what the common people think about their representatives.   They have to do more than just certain characterizations.    
Yeghishe
4/4/08
I did not write this http://www.petitiononline.com/yerevan/petition.html but I did sign it. Still I am thinking that all the actions of LTP are governed by Outside Powers that want unstable Armenia. There were many opportunities for Levon to protest against governing system; I don't say what he states are wrong. BUT  WHY NOW? He had 10 full years to do that. Who gets to profit from all these actions making an unstable country? So organized! For sure NOT THE PEOPLE
Vigen Mouradian  
4/11/08
Why? Why? Why?
Caroline Cox thinks we are bound to bring upon ourselves the implosion of our community and our ancestral land if we do not wake up and start putting our priorities in order.  Viken Attarian used a key word in his assessment of the current situation in Armenia.  "Evolutionary" was the word that caught my attention.  During our four thousand years of existence we have experienced many many upheavals  You name them, we have had them. If we need revolutions let's have them.  If we have to have governments subservient to major powers, let's have them.  If corrupt officials are to rule our land, let's have them.   In one word, our expectation that we could have a Jeffersonian democracy overnight is a far fetched dream.  Thus, evolution will sweep  away every wave of unrest and turbulence.  But Armenia and Armenians will not be just some ethnic existence through the annals of human history.  
Yeghishe
4/1/08
Armenians in Armenia lived socialism (in whatever form you may understand). Armenia was considered prosperous in the soviet union standards. People worked less hours a day and were paid satisfactory sums to maintain a decent life. The socialist system had a lot of limitations. Most of the people dreamed to have a capitalistic system; (they thought) economic freedom will help to enrich them, to create prosperity.
Capitalism for them was synonymous to western style of life and western abundance. No one, even the smart ones didn't imagine that capitalism could be like Pakistan or Cambodia, or any other country from the 3rd world. The same people uprooted "socialism" and sold factories as metal to Iran. Destroyed the economy and cultural, scientific institutions, almost everything, and opened the doors for capitalism. What is capitalism? Doesn't capitalist system give the right to a few to own the wealth of the country, and the rest have nothing but their labor?
In my opinion the turmoil in Armenia is the result of the disappointed masses, the dreams that did't come true.What we have is truly capitalism: newly formed rich people with the majority in poverty. The same is happening in all ex-Soviet Union republics, even in Russia. The whole damn mistake started with the first President. No goverment in the world can save the poor if the rich will not invest their money to esablish jobs for the poor, etc
Noobar 4/1/08
These why? why? why? concerns have bothered most of us for many years. You had the forsight to
crystalize them vividly. The real puzzle however is HOW? HOW and HOW? and by WHO? WHO? and WHO? Short
of an action plan with tangible measures we will continue to spin our wheels.
Please send me your e-mail address.

Hovsep Torossian, Detroit

An Open Letter to the Armenian Americans
Vahe Oshagan's comments: http://groong.usc.edu/ADconf/199909/speeches/oshagan.html
"The Armenian is he who suffers for not being an ideal Armenian…" Vahe Oshagan.
People in every nation's Diaspora expect of their homeland unrealistic achievements that cannot be fulfilled. Every nation's Diasporans freeze the time in their mind after they leave their homeland and hold on to the dream of the past; that creates wider chasm between the dreamers and reality on the ground. This is apparent with the layers of Diasporas that we have witnessed in every generation.
New immigrants regard the old comers as betrayers of the past, and the old immigrants regard the new comers
unrealistic of the new times in the new land.
Armenians are people like any other human beings. They have their daily needs, they struggle to put grocery at their table, want their children to have education, have families and all the other needs. Like any other nation, struggling in life brings with it the good and the bad, depending which side you look at. Reality on the ground is different.
If every society has its own fabric of behaviors, Armenians have too. They have clergy, we have too. They have politicians, we have too. They have businessmen, we have too. They have prostitutes, we have too. They have mafia, we have too… That is the reality. It is unnecessary to feel embarrassed to be an Armenian if our perceived standards do not meet with what exists in the real world.
Hence, I love Armenia, good or bad, unconditional, without fear. I love the way it was, the way it is and the way it will be. I have always loved Vartan as well as Vasag Suini and I think Vasag Suini was not a betrayer of the country, he was a practical man. There were many mistakes by our clergy during the turn of the last century, but believe it or not, the biggest mistake was done in my opinion, by Khrimian Hayrig. With all due respect, he was not a politician. And I love him, even though he may have ignited an unnecessary revolt.
In my opinion, Armenians outside Armenia should stop imposing their dream on Armenia. If I really care, I should abandon everything and go and live there, in Armenia, in Artsakh, on the land. Sending our crumbs and a few cents, does not make us patriots. I have relatives who did that in 1948 and recently to Artsakh.
Hagop Toroyan
3/30/08
Armenia at the Crossroads
Is it in our genetic make up to produce leaders of the stature of Gandhi who will set the tone of sacrifice and humility for the whole nation? If such a leader ever by chance came to exist will it be respected or laughed at as naive in the ways of this world? What values does the education system instill in the new generation as the clay that needs to be shaped as future leaders? Do we need to have a college specifically culturing such values in future leaders? If such students come from the elite families will they be able to understand that the use of power should not be in grabbing more power but in serving the least fortunate among them.
Vahe Balabanian 3/28/08
My Homeland is being pushed and pulled by the United States and Russia. Do not accuse the government for arresting those who see "Karabaghtsi" as its arch enemy. Shame on those who call themselves Armenian and have turned their back on Karabagh. The big powers learned how to divide and rule us. Shame on us that we haven't learned from our experiences of living in the Middle Eastern countries. Your Human Rights should be tossed in the garbage bin.
Rima Siraki 3/28/08
A Call for Justice, Respect for Human Rights and Democracy

Reflections on the Recent Tragedy in Yerevan
I fully agree!  There is nothing worse than calling for outside investigators and to advertise to the world our internal wrongs! Our country is still in its infancy and the last thing we need is outside interference.
Eugenie
3/12/08
Thank you very much. Now, there is more truth than falsehood. Let's think about the non-revolutionary ways to get out of this situation.
Gagik Hovhannisyan
3/12/08
I couldn't agree more with the last few paragraphs of your article.
Hratch Koumrouyan
Beirut/London
3/12/08
Yes, you are right, it is the worst thing to call for an international investigation.
Best regards,
Artur Ishkhanyan
3/11/08
Great posting, thank you for a breath of fresh air.
I am a development consultant, working in Armenia, Afghanistan and Pakistan, I have my own NGO in Armenia, working in rural development, implementing small projects with big impacts.
I tend to look at the entire development from a "sustainability" point of view and for what it's worth, here is my two cents.
Why do governments fail (Sachs, J. 2006)? due to lack of a transparent government and corruption.
Why do people end up in poverty trap (Sachs, J. 2006)? again, due to a non-transparent, corrupt government machinery at all levels.
Why do Diaspora and Western Donors fail (Easterly, W., 2006)? due to lack of a better understanding of "development", "sustainability" and "constant hand-outs".
Our Diaspora community members and organizations did absolutely NO favor to Armenians, but to promote a dysfunctional society by giving hand outs, we should have taught them "how to fish to feed self for life", not "to give them a fish every day".
Our Diaspora helped people to stand on their feet, but also contributed to "corruption", one would ask……how? well, we keep pouring money into funds without demanding for transparency, audit, accountability, so our money lands in wrong hands and/or spent on renovating a park for 2.0 million dollars across from Presidential Estate, now what exactly is the IMPACT? rather than the fact that our young kids gather at the park, munch on sunflower seeds, smoke and pollute the place, now, I work in rural areas, 2.0 million dollars will renovate at least 10 villages, if not more.
Yes, we built roads that fall apart during winter, why? There is no proper supervision. Yes, we built schools and placed computers and supplies that disappeared after few months, why? Because there is no sense of ownership by the community, again "it's a hand out". Yes, we built clinics, so that the physicians charge 10,000 AMD (under the table) to see poor patients. Yes, we sent tons of medicine that goes through Ministry of Health, then to be distributed to the same clinics and charge vulnerable patients.
I met a 70 year old woman in a village who complained about her feet and lack of blood circulation, when asked…..Metric why don't you go to local clinic? her response was. they charge 10,000 AMD for the visit and medicine……now, this is the same clinic built by GOOD DEED of Diaspora to help the poor.
I met a crying mother who lost her 5 year old boy to a "bee sting", a precious life lost to simple incident, she was not able to pay for medicine, again, another clinic built by Diaspora. Now, the question is…….do we have clinics and hospitals built by International NGOs that support the poor? absolutely, a clinic in Bejni, built by the World Vision, others built by OXFAM, all seem to be working well and serve the poor, why? because both are British organizations with a thorough strategic planning, every dollar counts. I personally contribute to both organizations (as little as $20.00) and receive paper statements on quarterly basis, I, as a donor have the right to audit their books at my expense.
Has anyone ever asked the question about "WHAT IS OUR STATUS?", we can't be placed as an under- developed country, while we are building multi-million dollar buildings and selling an apartment in Yerevan for $1700 per sq. meter, driving expensive cars and live a lavish life style……we can't be placed as transiting country….what have we got to show for since independence? economic development is not about three streets in YEREVAN, it's about the entire country, unemployment rate (more than 80 percent in rural areas), poverty rate (over 46 percent)…..we can't be placed as a POST CONFLICT, it's been over 16 years…so, on the one hand we are a developing country, on the other hand we fall into Millennium Challenge Account (MCA) with the poorest countries in the world….hmmmmm.
I have done my share to raise these issues with the Diaspora organizations, presented facts and figures about my findings, but all went astray due to cultural phenomena called "amot".
Our Diaspora sends money to Armenia out of romance and guilt, the idea is "I can't make a trip, so, I will send a thousand dollars" is WRONG. It's time to put "vision to action".
If our Diaspora is determined to make a difference and build a brighter, Democratic Armenia, they NEED TO STOP GIVING and start TEACHING. Teach people about "human rights", "rule of law", "democracy" and how to lead a transparent life, teach our youth "principles", "honesty", "integrity" to believe in their country and remain and serve the motherland.
We are going through another GENOCIDE, 1.0 million people migrated, we lose our intelligent youth to other countries, our girls are walking down the streets in Dubai to make a living, human trafficking is rising, the poor are trapped in "poverty trap", villages are left to rot, HIV/AIDS/MALARIA and other fatal diseases are spreading like the speed of light…..and human life has absolutely no value in Armenia.
All in all, Armenia is going through “aid curse” which defines as “high aid revenues going to the national government benefit political insiders, often corrupt insiders” (Easterly, W.)
May God bless Armenia and its people, and may none of us end up carrying a "white man's burden".
Hilda Grigorian
3/11/08
Looking Ahead Into the Future, Distancing From the Past is Unequivocally Obama's Path
We've seen many Obamas, we will see more. Depend on yourself only.
Zohrab Atarian
3/23/08
How patently Canadian of you to favor the American Senator considered to be the most inexperienced and the most liberal. We have one of yours as our governor and we’re all waiting for the next election to vote her and her liberal approach to governance out of office. What is even more annoying, short sighted, naïve, take your pick, is to suggest that we vote for either of the Democratic candidates because he/she favors the resolution to recognize the Armenian Genocide. Your socialist roots are showing. As an unhyphenated American of Armenian heritage (1st generation) I believe your political philosophy has, and continues to be shown as one that emasculates not liberates the soul of society. I sincerely take exception to your intrusion into our politics in an attempt to convince some unsuspecting or uninitiated soul that your argument, however well articulated, is credible.
Berge Paul Avesian Sr.
2/9/08
Cheers Abe
Agreed 100%!
Ruth
2/8/08
Hey guys out East and West in the USA………. All in the Family??? Are you talking about the Clinton term during the 1990's when President Billy Clinton Released his friend …..Obama after the Towers were bombed…. ? OOPS is that why he's not friendly with Husain? Or is that Osama? Oh wait…Obomba…Barak…Osama…Hee hee check it out….Hillary and Husain are going at it now…and Teddy Kennedy and Carolyn Kennedy and Oprah (who just got her new accent) and Kerry are all in love with Osama? Or was that Obama….Let's just call him Husain to cut the confusion…Hee, hee, somebody guessed it right; .he is Musl. Where is Monica in the picture? Is she voting for Billy's wife?
Anonymous
2/7/08
As Armenians we should not vote for the hippy crooks Clintons who stole the White House properties. Have you forgotten the clinto draft Dodger President, a coward like liar Bush who was against the recognition of the Armenian Genocide? Where was Hillary?
Don’t trust them. Give Obama a chance. If he does the same like his predecessors then this so called superpower is morally corrupt!
Robert C Paul
2/9/08

I have been reading about Obama's intentions to raise the isse of the Genocide Resolution once elected President. Although it is a noble cause, he is NOT the right person for America. There are many secrets about his past- much of his youth is associated with Islamic surroundings.

As Armenans, whether first or fourth generation, we always have a pull towards our Armenian roots, and even if not actively involved in Armenian affairs, most still support Armemian causes. This can be applied to Obama as well. He will always side with Islamic interests, including Tukrey, and this is not the type of leadership Armenans or America needs now.

When Bill Clinton was President, everyone knew it was a double team effort with him and Hillary. Our country was prosperous, we were at peace, we had a $9 billion surplus, and things were affordable. They were mostly a good 8 years.

So, in conclusion, I don't think supporting Obama just because he says supports our cause is enough for him to be President. America is in deep trouble- and we need someone who will lead us to prosperity once more- it is not Obama.

Please stop emailing for Armenians to support him.

Sincerely,
Elizabeth Davtian, California
2/6/ 08
I wouldn't hold my breath…on either of them. My paternal side voted for the past 100 years and died with the last ballot for a Democrat, believing the promises made to them since 1915 ish…..Ha…
Helen, USA
2/6/08
I hope for Obama too but sadly I don't have a vote!
Ruth, London UK
2/5/08
Although I live in Germany but like many of my armenian counterparts are closely following the election campaign in the US.

Our only hope is that the Armenian lobby will be strong enough to get some kind of written assurance that the promise made by either candidate will come true.

Sylvie Balian, Germany
2/5/08
Thank you for this incisive and passionate endorsement of Obama. I too have become tremendously excited with his campaign … I think… that we have a true progressive with a shot at the presidency on the scene and that the Armenian cause will only benefit from it.
Sevag, USA
2/4/08
I agree. A small chance but possible.
Bedros, California
2/4/08
Well written.
Hasmig
2/4/08
It’s only a game old chap! and there’s another approach by rule of thumb  –  for the diaspora armenian at large  –  “what irritates turkey cannot be bad”
Bedros
2/4/08

Your article is very true, I also believe that only a suffered person can understand what does it mean to live the trauma of suffering. Unfortunately I don't believe that the American people can make the right choice this time…. after all these are the same people who elected  that criminal twice…Let's hope that I am wrong… which I doubt..

Arsine, Canada
2/3/08
Isn't Obama A muslim?
Zizi, USA
2/3/08
Thank YOU!!!!
Janet Mouradian
2/3/08

Nicely written. i see you live in canada? are you a US citizen so you can vote?
Nellie, USA
2/3/08
Would you please not send people spam messages about things you have no understanding of? Caroline Kennedy
may be considered an authority in Istambul, but among sentient people in the US she is just another airhead on the level of Britney Spears. And that's the smallest bit of nonsense in your letter.

Patrick, USA
2/3/08
Thank you! …couldn't agree more. We are disturbed that (some people)…think that just because Clinton signed a statement saying she would recognize the Genocide, that she actually would. We all remember, as you note, Clinton's actions preventing the resolution from coming to the House floor during his terms. We, too, think Clinton has too much baggage – without sufficient transparency.
Samantha Power has waxed eloquently about him…Let's hope…I'll forward your email to friends.
Carolann, USA
2/3/08
 
Thank you for doing such a masterful job of explaining bit by bit the various attributes of both candidates and then voicing your opinion that Obama is by far the right choice to make. I hope your article has far reaching influence in the Armenian community nationwide so that your logic will help them make or reach the same conclusion.
Harry Parsekian, Watertown
2/3/08
 
I'm 100% sure that America is still not ready for either a black or a woman president. The Democrats simply destroyed themselves for the coming elections.

No matter who gets on the Republican's train – even an aBush more than the current aBush – the Republican candidate will win the presidency.

America is full of hypocricy. It is still racist and still discrimates more than any other country in the world. Those 60
million who voted for Bush the second time, and helped him win even with the Iraq mess, will vote for the republican candidate simply because the Republican candidate is a WHITE MAN, not black or woman.

What is more sad is that the Armenians are again falling in the trap of believing Obama or Clinton – or anyone for that matter – will recognize the Genocide, so "let's all vote for him/her" story and campaign. Bush Jr, Clinton, Bush Sr. all promised to recognize it, but once they became president they noticed their interests with Turkey is much larger than their interest with Armenia or the Armenian diaspora, who are only good during voting, not after voting.

Hope one day we will wake up and work on something more important than gathering votes for this or that candidate. We are more politically stupid than I could imagine.

Katia, Canada
2/3/2008
Well written.
Thomas Walkom of Toronot Star, 6 February 2008, in his article  Believe it or not, a Republican could win again has a different take on what's in the bag. It complements this section of comments and it's posted for those who are interested in a Canadian perspective.
He writes,

"Lost in the excitement over the race between Hillary Clinton and Barack Obama is a possibility that once seemed remote but that now does not. In the end, regardless of the hype surrounding their rivalry, neither might win the U.S. presidency. In the end, another Republican – probably John McCain – may well end up replacing George W. Bush.
At one level, this should be obvious. The U.S. primaries, including last night's Super Tuesday extravaganza, are designed to pick Republican and Democratic presidential nominees. The full-bore race for America's top job won't take off until late summer.

However, the sheer drama of the Clinton-Obama contest makes many of us forget that fact. Behind the fascination with the details of last night's primaries – such as how California's 370 Democratic delegates will eventually be apportioned – lies the assumption that one of these two will become president and thereby put paid to the disastrous Bush presidency.

Outsiders look at America and ask how voters could make any other reasonable choice. They see Republican Bush as having presided over a botched war and a stumbling economy. Many (including many Canadians) say America is now the gravest threat to world peace. What sane person could wish for more of that? And for a while it did seem that the Republicans had little hope in 2008. They were repudiated in the mid-term congressional elections. Their presidential contenders, or at least those considered likely to win nomination in a party still dominated by the religious right, seemed fatally flawed.

Conservatism itself seemed in retreat as the ideological factions within the Republican party began sniping at one another.

But then three things happened. First, Bush's so-called troop surge in Iraq has worked, if not permanently, at least enough to remove the war from the front burner of domestic politics.
Second, Republican voters in the early primary contests delivered a rebuke to the purists of their own party by voting in significant numbers for the candidate best positioned to attract Democrats and independents – McCain. He is not yet a shoo-in. But he continued to slowly and steadily amass delegates last night with wins from New York to Oklahoma. (Democrats are beginning, belatedly, to realize that McCain will be the one to beat. Hence the recent spate of blogging attacks on him for his temper, his policy flip-flops and the fact that his grandfather took part in America's late-19th century subjugation of the Philippines.)

Third, the sheer amount of attention paid to Clinton and Obama, as well as their sniping at one another, has reminded Americans why so many mistrust the Democrats. Clinton, in spite of years of edge softening, still comes across as the great schemer. As for Obama, there is a children's crusade element to his campaign that is reminiscent less of John Kennedy than of George McGovern, the Democratic senator who lost to Richard Nixon in 1972.

And finally there are the questions most are too polite to ask. When it comes to race, sex and religion, Americans are a remarkably conservative people. In Canada, Roman Catholics have routinely served as prime ministers since the 19th century. But Americans did not elect their first Roman Catholic president until 1960.

Come November, will U.S. voters be willing to elect either a woman or a black man? The Republican party, by bringing to the fore a candidate that can be presented as reasonable, is giving them an excuse to do neither."

Thomas Walkom, Toronto Star Contributor, 6 February, 2008"
Why Don't Armenians Support the Idea of Setting up an International Commission?
The article that stuck out was "Why don't Armenians support the idea of setting up an international commission" as it seemed to be from a non-Armenian and an academic.
 
I enjoyed reading the back and forth correspondences between the two of you. Somewhere along the way I thought that this guy is a Turk. Fine. No problem. But when I read a couple of sentences in the second last paragraph of his second email I was put off. The way he reconciles the deaths committed by Armenians and those by Turks is sheer perversion of a grand scale. Quite a misrepresentation  for someone who speaks of  "talking about scientific knowledge".

Admittedly he somewhat redeems himself in the last paragraph with its colorfulness.
 
Che–
2/11/08
Why is Tuna Baskoy advocating the setting up of a new international commission to look into the historical facts of 1915? This work has already been carried out by the pre-eminent group of independent scholar, the International Association of Genocide Scholars, who have affirmed the Armenian Genocide in two formal statements resolved in conference, and in a letter directly to the Turkish Prime Minister. There is also independent corroboration in the ICTJ Memorandum and with the Permanent People's Tribunal in Paris. I would like him, and others of the same persuasion, to study these and then tell us why these should be set aside and the whole issue looked at afresh. Neither the Armenians nor Turks were directly involved with these analyses and conclusions. So what is the value of a David & Goliath confrontation between these two peoples? I believe that some people have a lot of catching up to do!

Armenag Topalian
2/9/08
Dr Tuna Baskoy while taking the high ground forgets the value of redemption in avoiding future repetitions. He juxtaposes a State crime with the willingness of the suppressed to liberate themselves from the yoke of State injustices. If Armenians were rebelling and were "relocated" which was not the case, how can he account for 750,000 Assyrians that perished in the 1915 Genocide which Assyrians call Seypa. Were Assyrians confused for Armenians or were they only in the way of a sinister plot for Pan-Turkism? Let him be humble and come down from his pedestal of righteousness. Only then we shall be able to embrace each other. A prosperous future is not a currency to cover past misdeeds because it is a fantasy which will not happen.
Vahe Balabanian
2/9/08
Isn't the International Association of Genocide Scholars much more than a commission for Prof. Baskoy ? The dispute is not between "Armenian" and "Turkish" historians, it is between the denialist Turkish official position and the rest of the scholarly world. The IASGS ( http://genocidescholars.org/ ) has recognized the fact of the Genocide against the Armenians. As for leaving the past behind, that's possible only after we (Armenians and Turks, Armenia and Turkey) agree about that common past. So long as there's denial, the past won't let go of us. Furthermore, Genocide is not a minor incident to just "accept" it and move on; Armenia and Armenians continue to suffer because of the Genocide. There should be a remedy for it.
Giro Manoyan, Yerevan, Armenia
2/9/08
"Hopes in … dreams last much longer than fear instilled through murders."
…first thing which should be done – the President of Armenia should speak in UN about Genocide. We cannot wait 200 years that all countries in the world recognize the massacres of the Armenians in the Ottoman Empire. This is a road to nowhere.
Viktor, Armenia
1/15/2008
In order to prevent genocide, we need to learn about it
I enjoyed the articles, especially, the one regarding Grade 11 curriculm, and the synopsis of the other articles.
Shavarsh, Toronto

Armenians Demand Justice, Not Recognition
finally someone makes sense…  i am armenian…and i do not want an apology…  i want lands back… and i want reparation back  to rebuild what was destroyed…  apology will not bring back my great grand parents….  Turkey for its salvation has no other choice but to build a strong neighbor in Armenia… for it to survive   and not be doomed to oblivion…  turkey thinks it is strong but in 10-50 years it could be totally destroyed from within if it keeps   its present course…  no one country can bully others and expect to survive…someone is going to say enough is enough….
Vrej Keoshkerian, Toronto
6/12/07
Fully agree with Sassounian on this issue.
Haig Baltadjian, Montreal
11/12/07
Dear Turkish Canadians,
As you are all out of your home country, you may hear strange things… Stories about "Armenian Genocide" or similar stories about those old Christians who were living in your hometown. I welcome you to "real free world"…have you ever thought why these Armenians are scattered all over the world? Yes we are the survivors of the Armenian Genocide committed by the Young Ottoman Turks, and we all are looking for justice…
My ancestors were living peacefully for more than 3000 years in Turkey, then, Armenia. A population of 1.5 million vanished from the face of the earth between 1915-1923. The world at the time made a big noise..but nothing else. Later Hitler would say "after all who remembers the Armenians."
That is why Hitler felt free to order the SS army to kill Poles and Jews in Europe. The Europeans ignored, until in 1945 they saw what had happened.
What you hear from Armenians is the truth…something that you have never heard while you were living in Turkey…
I would like to sit beside my Turkish friends and tell them, "I do not hate you." It is your generals and their friends that do not want you to know the past, That is why the penal code and article 301 was brought in. They want you to believe that  Armenians hate you.
Germans did get over it long time ago…You too after knowing what happened will be able to.
I recommend to every Turk living in Canada to read about "The George Town Boys" or watch documentary videos about them to learn how and why they came to Canada.
Sincerely,
Grish Begian, Toronto
you can reach me at [email protected]
10/1/08

Here is a solution. . .but what was the problem?
Hi: I understand your frustrations and anger with the Diaspora and Armenia. However, try to realize that Armenian psyche was shaped by historical and geographical influences, political harassment by host countries, etc. etc.etc.
I am not rationalizing the Armenian psyche, the mistakes, etc. etc. etc.
There are solutions, and the solutions are what are qually provided to all peoples, nations, who have similarly suffered genocide, theft of homeland, annihialation of a nation… that is the end result of the Armenian psyche….
Armenians are entitled to the damages in money, land, compensation and return of everything taken from them to make them whole, although nothing will make them whole….
Now, if you want to discuss how we can overcome difficulties, that is different! We have to take what we are left with, understand why it is what it is, and come up with positive building blocks.
Try not to blame Armenians and have such harsh feelings for what it is now! You will feel better, and you can see positive solutions to overcome difficulties. If you do not want to participate in the nation building, then watch it struggle to it's aims.
At the end of the day, I say, Armenians will be the last ones to close the chapter on mankind, engage in destroying the world ecologically, politically, economically. Armenians were indeed the inhabitants of and creator of cradle of civilization, and they will be the last ones to die out.
Salute!

Angela Barseghian
10/1/08
The Fundamentals of Armenian identity or who is an Armenian
Fully agree with Dr. Armen Ayvazians view point; I suggest the immidiate course of action without cost to anyone as follows:
1- Let Etchmiatsin the mother church pass a law and let all our vartabet(s) get married and form a families in Armenia;
2- Let the Armenian government pass a law to withhold money in trust from those Armenian families who want to emigrate to other countries and if they do not return after 3 years transfer the amount to the next of kin living in Armenia;
3- Reactivate NERGAGHT commitee as soon as possible;
4- Give a plot of land to Azatamartiks and new returneees;
5- Let the Armenian government enact a law to allow any spurkahay like Raffi Hovanessian run for office.
Enough is enough! Let us build plants where people can work; treat all proffessors same as military leaders..
Tom Siraki, Toronto
6/12/07

This is indeed very interesting. However, there are a few points I would like to emphasize here regarding Dr. Armen Ayvazyan's input.
1) Armenians are a bit similar to the Jews. Their power remains in their DIASPORA, more than anywhere else.
2) The great asset Armenians have is their integration with the country/nation they are living in. Integration does not always mean forgetting your origins, your language, your history.
3) I have always aspired towards the Human side of a Nation and its Universal nature; I am against the "ghettoesque" (a la maniere juive) type of societies Armenians (like any others) tend to be subjected to. A lot of Armenians are married to non-Armenians; that does not make them at all less Armenian, on the contrary.
4) To be Armenian, it is a feeling you would have to be proud of, to remember, to dream, to be sensible to Armenian music, literature, history, religion, sports, movies, VIPs, etc.
George, Florida
7/12/07
Genocide acknowledgment: A Dead End?
As a Turk I acknowledge the Armenian genocide and recognise that the Turkish government must make a clear acknowledgement of this historical fact. There are also two significant points to remember with regard to Turkey. First, Turkey is a nation of over 70 million whose strategic profile is rising in terms of being an energy corridor as well as in other areas of economic development. Armenia is only a nation of 3.5 million and the Diaspora can only do so much as the recent situation with the American Congress has proven. Second, time is on the side of Turkey. To win all it has to do is, well, nothing. However, the best Armenians can hope for is some level of monetary reparations. Anything beyond this is hyper-illusionary. Clinging to unrealistic hopes will only defer any positive action by Turkey.
Celal
24/12/08
Mirror, Mirror on the Wall, Who is the Most Powerful of All
In line with Avedis Kevorkian's story, Armenians are the most powerful. America is afraid of Turkey, and the Turks are afraid of the Armenians, so who is the most powerful. The power is on the side of truth, they know it and they are afraid of it. They know how ugly it is.
Noobar, NJ
10/12/07

No Mr. Wiesel, You don't speak on my behalf
Thank you for saying a big NO to Mr. Wiesel. Why these people become so nervous every time when the recognition of the Armenian Genocide comes so close? What worries them to make weird comments and try to find "excuses" not to name the "tragic events" of 1915-1923 as Genocide? It seems to me that they want to show to the world that genocide-holocaust happened only to their people, they are the only nation who suffered, they are the ones who lost millions in WWII. Did they lose LAND, a motherland?
Minas Kojayan
25/11/07
Thank you for your eloquent reply to Elie Wiesel's racist remarks. Athough he is known as a humanitarian and a human rights activist, unfortunately, he has tunnel vision. He doesn't want to address the Genocide of Armenians, and he has no desire to look at Israel's current and former ethnic cleansing of Palestinians.
I lost respect for him once I educated myself on the Israel/Palestine issue, and realized that like many other Jewish people, he believes only in the suffering of the Jews;  the injustices done to all other peoples can and should be ignored, particularly those perpetrated by Israel.
I say this as an American who is ethnically Jewish; I grew up with this ethos, and I strongly reject it. Again, thank you so much for sharing your anger at his appalling words.
Ruth Elkin
30/11/07

I Need Your Help Doc!

After much experience similar to your complaints, I have come to the conclusion that we depend too much and unnecessarily on who many of us call "our leadership" or "our Armenian friends". I don't know why many come to the conclusion that these people are more intelligent than us!
Why do we need them to teach our children to be proud of being an Armenian? What is your role as a parent?
Why do we need them to tell us who is a good friend or a good spouse? What's wrong with your own brain, logic, judgement and opinion?
Why do we need some so-called friends to tell us this school or that school is good or bad? What's wrong with the education you got? Are you not able to go to a school and ask around and see for yourself which is good or better than another? Are you so illiterate and uneducated that you cannot decide which school is better or worse?
Why do we let other people meddle in our own lives? Why do we believe blindly that WISDOM is pouring out of their ears and mouth, while we don't have an ounce of common sense? and then we blame them for all the woes we have.
It's about time we blame ourselves.
You smoke, you get lung-cancer, you blame the cigarette companies.
You eat a lot, you get obese, you get a stroke, you blame the junk food companies.
And you let others meddle in your personal life, your children's upbringing, your relationship with your wife (or husband), and then you blame them…
Dr. Katia 😉
21/11/2007
I presume you are looking for a common cause underlying the three examples you mention. The medical analogy will probably be a "syndrome": a group of symptoms and signs that will characterize a single pathologic state. I have a hard time to find one causal factor in all three.
In the first example of removing the children from an Armenian school of Apostoloc faith and sending them to a Catholioc school (?Armenian Catholic) could possibly be due to teachings in the first school that are not acceptable to the parents.
Your third example of divorce in a couple of opposing backgrounds of national "ideologies" could also possibly arise from lack of tolerance, sensitivity and respect to differing opinions about national issues. I know of several couples of opposing national views, who have no such complications in their families as the example you give.
As to your second example of our young aduld children who remain indifferent to our national concerns (and this is a very generalized phenomenon),  the closest I can get to the causal factors of the above two examples will be the youth's dismissal of our national issues as old-fashioned and senseless arguments. I am confident that they (at least a good number of them) will find their own way of contributing to the survival of the Armenian identity, specially since the independence of Armenia, the international sensitivity of the Armenian Genocide and the presence of world-famous Armenians.
Therefore, if there is an underlying pathological cause in your three examples, it would be rigid stereoptypes in behavior in some sectors, and hopefully this is changing to the better.
Haroutiun
23/11/2007
Most of what the young do is a reflection and imitation of their parents. Look no further. The fault is with us and the solution is also with us. I am sure for every such case you can find many more of counter cases. But the ones that hurt are the ones we dwell on.
Vahe
30/11/07
Open Letter of Protest

Turkey will not find peace until it comes to terms with its past and acknowledge its citizens' right to express what they think.
I support Dikran Abrahamian's effort for greater democracy in Turkey.
Ayse Gunaysu
I endorse fully the contents of the open letter of protest
Diran Avedian, Montreal
Everybody has to condemn the last action of Turkey to try the two journalists of Armenian origin as a violation of freedom of speech. (Translated from Spanish)
Spain

The reason I am writing …..is to express my admiration to Fatma and Elif and every body else in the circle of Turkish intellectuals waging a war for establishing democratic values in Turkish minds and souls. The going is tough; it is an uphill battle, rowing against the tide of misinformed masses of the Turkish society. It is a dangerous undertaking for them. People are jailed and assassinated for fighting ignorance. Galileo insisted on his truth. He was jailed. Jesus had to be tortured, put on the cross and only then he ascended to heaven to live in glory.
Yeghishe

What's Next?

For me… the most important item would be the Morning After… That is, when Ankara accepts the Armenian Genocide. Recent developments around the globe, in particular in the US, when ADL (recognized) the Armenian genocide, many Turkish voices have joined in, showing that the Turkish inner defense is experiencing structural cracks…It is evident that the TIME clock is at its count-down mode for Armenians, who have been waiting for so long. There will be one morning when Armenians will wake up to the news that Ankara has recognized the Armenian Genocide..

I question, what mechanisms do Armenians have in place to be able to rise to the moment? As a consequence, who will be the Supreme Authority to negotiate? Is it the President of Armenia, the Catholicos of all Armenians, the Catholicos of Cilicia, and the prominent political parties in the Diaspora? Who?

I am not surprised, none of the above has raised this question because they individually perceive that they simply disqualify. I am afraid, the Armenian Cause that thus far had been like a belt holding us in-one, will snap the Morning After. I am even afraid to question, how good will it be when the TIME comes we, as a nation and people, are unprepared for it.
Harout

Your cause albeit interesting, lacks many fundamental reasons to compel a community to lobby for an embassy in Armenia.
Vatche Manoug

A billion (s) dollar Canadian investments in Armenia will create a better Armenia than just a poetic representation.
Tom

Thank you for bringing up this issue. I often wondered what will it take for us to have Canadian Embassy in Yerevan and I often wondered why we have not pushed for it for so long. Today I will also write the Prime Minister of Canada and the leader of the opposition party, thanking them again for recognizing the Genocide and urging them to consider opening of an Embassy in Yerevan, and I would remind and urge every Armenian in Canada to do the same.

Right Hon Steven Harper,

First of all, as a Canadian Armenian, let me thank you for recognizing the Genocide against the Armenians by Turkey. I was so proud last April 24 in Yerevan the capital of Armenia to see the marchers holding high the Canadian flag along with the flags of the other brave countries that recognized that Genocide had taken place against the Armenians.

The next thing that Canadian Armenians will be proud of is seeing a Canadian Embassy in Yerevan. There is a need and we will be proud to visit our embassy when traveling in Armenia.

Keep up the good work.

Vrejouhy
Calgary, Alberta

To all Federal Politicians in Ottawa,

We are all very thankful for the votes in Parliament recognizing the Armenian Genocide. The next logical step would be to open a Canadian Embassy in Yerevan, Armenia. The Armenian Government has an Embassy in Ottawa. This makes good sense for two Democratic countries who have proven to be good friends and allies.

Sincerely,

Carl Georgian
Brantford, Ontario

As far as I am concerned, the future of our race is directly dependent on the survival and prosperity of Armenia/Karabagh. Without Armenia/Karabagh, the Armenian community in Canada will be an irrelevant entity; therefore we should all focus and work on strengthening Armenia/Karabagh, lock stock and barrel.

Migirdich

I endorse the idea of making our voices heard on the issue of opening up a Canadian embassy in Armenia. I'll try to raise this issue with other Armenians I know to see if we can initiate a campaign over this topic.

Davit Zargarian

Anything positive concerning Armenia is welcome. I guess we had to thank Mr. Dion for his approval to open a Canadian Embassy in Armenia, but after 6 months it’s a little late.
Souren Dermelkonian

It would be nice to publish a sample of a letter stating the statistics in favour for opening a Canadian embassy in Armenia.
V.

I believe we should persuade federal officials to establish a Canadian embassy in Armenia, and build on the recent praise-worthy actions made by them in recognizing the Genocide. Stronger relationship with Armenia, underscores Canada's commitment to cooperation and progress with countries wronged by injustice.
Vartan
 
I endorse the idea of making our voices heard on the issue of opening up a Canadian embassy in Armenia. I'll try to raise this issue with other Armenians to see if we can initiate a campaign over this topic.
Davit Zargarian
 
Anything positive concerning Armenia is welcome; I guess we had to thank Mr. Dion for his approval to open a Canadian Embassy in Armenia, but after 6 months it’s a little late to thank now.
Souren Der Melkonian
I believe we should persuade federal officials to establish a Canadian embassy in Armenia, and build on the recent praise-worthy actions taken by them in recognizing the Genocide as a historical fact. Openness to a stronger relationship with Armenia underscores Canada's commitment to cooperation and progress with countries wronged by injustice.
Anonymous
Your cause, albeit interesting, lacks many fundamental reasons to compel a community to lobby for an embassy in Armenia.
Vatche Manoug
A billion dollar Canadian investment in Armenia will create a better Armenia than just a poetic representation. For example, Canada can invest in the energy sector, for design and manufacturing of renewable energy, parts and components.  Canada’s need can be fulfilled by Armenia's human resources.
Tom
 
I often wondered what will it take for us to have Canadian Embassy in Yerevan, and I often wondered why we have not pushed for it for so long. Today I will also write the Prime Minister of Canada and the leader of the opposition party, thanking them again for recognizing the Genocide and urging them to consider opening of an Embassy in Yerevan, .and I would remind and urge every Armenian in Canada to do the same.
Vrejouhy
It would be nice to publish a sample of a letter stating the statistics in favour of opening a Canadian embassy in Armenia. Vahe
As far as I am concerned, the future of our race is directly dependent on the survival and prosperity of Armenia/Karabagh. Without Armenia/Karabagh, the Armenian community in Canada will be an irrelevant entity; therefore we should all focus and work on strengthening Armenia/Karabagh, lock stock and barrel.
Migirdic
 It has been a long time coming, but we are all very thankful for the votes in Parliament recognizing the Armenian Genocide; the next logical step would be to open a Canadian Embassy in Yerevan. The Armenian Government has an Embassy in Ottawa This makes good sense for two Democratic countries that have proven to be good friends and allies.  
Carl Georgian
A Faux Pas
I am against faith based school funding; they should stop funding the catholic schools.
Ani

I couldn't have said it better! Thanks for your courage,
Zareh

I'm unequivocally opposed to the idea of publicly funded religious schools … It is odd that the Cons are pushing this agenda since it is a far more "liberal" idea. 

Arby
I personally support public schools and am against spending public money on religious schools… As far as the Armenian community goes, I see the benefit of receiving public funds by Armenian schools.This is not the first time that such a dichotomy occurs.
Vahe
Please check today's Globe and Mail's survey on this subject, as of 00:50 am, it is 83% against the funding of faith based school. As for our leadership "consulting" each other before such positions are taken…it will not happen in my life-time.
Migirdic  
Thank you for sharing your thoughts ….Unfortunately, no one seems to be listening nor doing anything about it.
Pierre
 
Armenian parents send their children to Armenian schools for various reasons, but faith has not been the main driving factor. There are parents of different denominational backgrounds, even Jehovah’s witnesses. Along with the academic standard and often as important, they feel their children are SAFE in the nurturing atmosphere that both Armenian day schools offer in Toronto, as well as the heritage that comes from both the Armenian curriculum and the internal culture that the schools have developed over the years.

However, you can find parents who do not feel that much emphasis has to be laid on some Armenian subjects. This attitude is not unique in Canada. The effects are dire even in Lebanon, where deemphasizing Armenian subjects started much earlier.

Another point I'd like to make is: In the Catholic school system only the subject of religion (catechism) that is taught is a differentiating factor from public schools. Is it only religion that will be taught in the 'faith-based' schools? Armenian schools don't teach only Armenian religion, Jewish schools don't teach only Judaism and the list may go on. Who is to set the limits or control the curriculum? If only religion will be taught and be controlled closely (which I doubt), other questions/concerns will arise related to the teaching of language, culture and heritage as the raison d'être of most of these schools.

Educators were not consulted in this matter. Well, the leaders have known and know better!! That has been the case in our history too. Is it only an Armenian trait for centres or groups of different ideologies to limit their cooperation to the barest minimum, which might sometimes be interpreted as ‘underestimation’ of the other–if I may use the word? Unfortunately, leaders in the community do not have the flexibility to cooperate and consult one another when issues of common interest arise. I do not make this statement regarding the matter of faith based schools only, but other vital community matters as well. We cannot afford running our community with this mentality, especially in this age and more importantly in Canada.

With the news of a recent rapprochement between two prominent Armenian political parties in Armenia, followed by the publication of a joint communiqué, I would like to be optimistic that positive changes will incur not only in Armenia, but especially in the Armenian communities abroad, where, before very long, the question of identity will become a major issue.

Hasmig Kurdian (Educator)

An Open Letter to Patriarch Mutafyan
Rachel Goshgarian presents a very sober look at the situation of the Archbishop Mesrob Mutafyan as a hostage to the rulers of Turkey. Archbishop Mutafyan had threats to his life on the aftermath of the assassination of Hrant Dink and I remember he had a private visit by Erdogan at his patriarchate. Archbishop Mesrob Mutafyan has made no secret of his support for Erdogan in the last election. I wonder what the two spoke about.
Vahe Balabanian

I was impressed with this open letter written to Arch. Mesrob Mutafyan. He thinks he is playing politics, but He is totally wrong. I do not expect from Him to be "heghapokhakan", but He is crossing the limits of playing politics. What is He afraid of. This why there was a sort of controversy or coolness between the late Dink and His Beatitude.
Minas

Thank you for forwarding this link. It is a wonderful letter.
Ruth Elkin

In my opinion (our) Diaspora has never been a monolithic entity as suggested…and I do not see this being mentioned anywhere in the version of the interview that I have seen. The academic objectivity and the mixed emotions that have been expressed kindly and directly indicate how diverse our Diaspora is. From a global perspective, the historic progress of our Diaspora in the context of social, economic, political and cultural development has been very complex.

I think the real question about what is being planned should also be asked to the "Masters" that the Patriarch seems to be dealing with…Have the "masters" completed compiling the list of the "accepted individuals from our Diaspora" who will start discussions?….about the "recognition of the Genocide" ?…and is all this energy and activity only about recognition? Are the "masters" close in terms of concluding the names of "their selected Diaspora individuals"…to start these discussions …? Who represents the Diaspora? is the question that we must address and deal with ? Are we ready to accept "selected individuals" by a certain administration?
Hratch Minassian

I feel indebted to the author for this letter. (She) speaks on behalf of all of us. I wish we could ask the Patriarch why he behaves this way, what are the hidden reasons! (Translated from Armenian)
Zareh (Armenia)

I very much enjoyed reading Rachel Goshgarian's letter to patriarch Mutafyan.

Thomas Chanian, San Jose, California
 
I'm speechless. All I can say is 'hats off to Rachel', as she speaks on behalf of all of us. I wish you could pass this on to her.
Hasmig
Banner & Song of Himnatram

That was cool. I am an Armenian kid. I live in Texas I’ll post more soon: Garmeer, Gabooyd, and Dziranakooyn.
Anonymous
Shall we Wake up or Continue Sleeping

My sentiments exactly!!
Carl

I just read Mr. Attarian's comments about faith based schools and the Armenian position. I regret to say that he has a very wrong concept of Canadian multiculturalism and its primary objectives. Unfortunately he is not alone and may have been swayed by media reports. The Canadian multiculturalism act which was promulgated in 1988, and which is also the first of its kind in the world, outlines clearly the basic principles of what we want in Canada as a fundamental characteristic: that is, the equal treatment of all its citizens whether in the public or private sector. In short (that’s how) Trudeau also envisaged the development of a just society. It requires all government departments to report all their activities that guide their operations towards this ideal.
I must end humbly that as a member of the Canadian Multiculturalism Council, I was involved in the preparatory work for this Act.
Artie Hagopian

Will justice be denied again?
This is a letter I just emailed to Lynn Woolsey, my representative.
I encourage you guys to do the same. 🙂

Dear Lynn,

I was pleased to hear that the foreign affairs committee passed a resolution to recognize the Armenian Genocide. If I am correct, this will now go to the House of Representatives for another vote. As you know, our government's recognition of the Armenian Genocide infuriates the Turkish government. People in the Executive branch are suggesting that Turkey could even end up cutting off the supply lines to Iraq over this. Well, I think that now the House finally has a chance to truly represent the will of the voters and end the war in Iraq by passing the resolution recognizing the Genocide. Make Turkey so mad that they withdraw their "support" of the war and BAM – it's over. We depend on them so heavily to maintain this war that I believe we would be forced to begin withdrawals. Let's do it. Please. I hope you vote to approve the resolution. As an American of Armenian heritage, I can tell you that it really means a lot to at least have OUR government finally recognize the atrocities as what they were – a genocide on my ancestors. Most people of Armenian heritage pretty much know that Turkey will never admit to this, but we are all very grateful that others do. Doing it at a time like this in the face of their threats makes it mean that much more. Thanks in advance for your vote. By passing the resolution the House can do two good deeds at once.
Chris Svenson

Will justice be denied again?" as title leaves the reader in doubt!
However, the opinions expressed in the following text leave every reader in a state of clear understanding and belief that the Armenian Genocide Resolution should and will be recognized by Congress!
Artin Avedissian

Excellent Article.
Gabe Korajian

It is about time for the so called super power to acknowledge the Armenian Genocide. But they are so afraid to loose their loyal ally that did not let our troops on their soil. How hypocritical can you get?? This poor country of murderers is paying $300,000.00 a month to the lobbyists, $105,000.00 to the Livingstone(ex-congressman)group, $114,000.00 to Fleishman Hillard, to name a few. The money is American aid to turkey. May be if the US will give them some more aid they can pay all the corrupt congress. This money is our taxpayers’ money. To mention some more of these corrupt American greed, Steven Solarz, Hastert, Snowcroft and don't forget Gephard; he flip flopped, and was paid by Turkey. Money buys anything in the US. If you have money you can get away with murder. Almost everyday you will read of some corrupt or fraudulent deals by our high paid officials. US greed is on the rise.
Paul

Yes to recognizing the Genocide!
My Ancestors were from Van and Kars. My grandma told us everything.
Elmira

The Recent Convictions of Serkis Seropyan and Arat Dink

It is clear from her account that Fatma (Gocek) is frustrated. Clearly the letter writing campaign has not worked out as expected. Any campaign conducted outside Turkey will be looked at as interference and subject to threats by Turkey. How can we beat blind nationalism? It is through educating the Turkish public starting from the segment which clearly wants to be educated and not easily carried out by nationalism. Let us seek and organize this segment from within Turkey.
Vahe

My father was a survivor of the 1894-98 Genocide in Constantinople;
He was 4 years old. My grand father held him tight on his chest, ran to the Armenian Church, and barely escaped the Turks on his heels. The Armenian self defenders opened fire from the building and dispersed the cowards. This was Constantinople; how more violent was the situation in Anatolia? There, people were torched in the church.

One interesting item came to my mind. We in unison call the Kurdish rebels that approximately (represent) 1/4 of Turkey's population as terrorists. Now, our (American) rebels desiring independence from the British crown, were they also terrorists or people rebelling against injustice? If there is reaction by the Kurds, is it not against the actions of fellow Moslem by the Turks? This is now; how much more violent was the treatment of the Christians? Over centuries how did our people suffer (in the hands) of … Turkish invaders of our historical lands?
Berdj

Turkey is a country of beauty and the beast; while the land itself is so rich with cultural and geographical beauty, it is unfortunately filled with …(untold crimes)! Think about it, if there were no Armenian Genocide issue at hand, it would be something else, like the Kurds or other tribal group problem or their own terrorism that the citizens have to deal with.

I salute people like Serkis and Arat and his father "Hrant Dink" for their bravery …I salute them whole heartedly for what they stand for. And as a US Citizen, I can not stomach the corrupt politics of our country and how in denial we are about doing the right thing as recognizing the "First Genocide of the 20th Century", The Armenian Genocide.
S. B. Pie
Mutafyan Must Tell Turks No – Or Be Ignored by the World

Kevorkian's article tackles issues never raised before, despite their blaring nature. One of these is the complete complacency of the Greeks, both in Greece and the Diaspora, especially the USA. They have never protested against Turkey despite their having U.S. senators, congressmen and a Secretary of State of Greek descent. This is appalling. We need to get them involved in the political process, or maybe not (as Mr. Kevorkian would likely comment that it would be like beating a dead donkey). Yes they do have a country geographically much better than our beloved Armenia, but they have suffered from the Turks no less than us.
Roupen Dekmezian
No, Mr. Wiesel, you don’t speak on my behalf!

…if the label "genocide" should not apply to what happened to the Armenians because the word wasn't coined at the time, it follows that what happened to the Jews in World War II also was not a "genocide," since. . .etc. That is why Jews use "Holocaust" or "Sho'ah" rather than "genocide."
Kevorkian

Elie Wiesel had disappointed me and shocked me a long time ago when a reporter asked him if the Jewish Holocaust was a good enough reason to occupy Palestine and deprive the Palestinian Arabs of their ancestral lands. His answer was "what Palestine?" I'll let every sane person to draw his own conclusion about this so-called saintly "persecuted Holocaust survivor".
Yeghishe

If "genocide" was not yet a word in reference to the Armenians then what does it mean today? It seems that Mr. Wiesel has been "brain washed" by western thought. There must be comparisons of "east is not west." There can be no words to express the "horror" meted out to innocent victims. Mr. Wiesel would be wise to consider that if he were put in prison in western democracies how he would defend himself, especially if he had done no wrong! Would he willingly accept that "might is right?” I submit that he would not. And he certainly would not want to be another Mahar Arar.
Unus Ali.

… I will not even call him Mr. because it is a title, and Wiesel with his position who lies about Armenian Genocide and historical facts for a purpose/s, doesn't deserve to be called Mr. Shame on him.
Avo

Well put. Those two examples of Musa Dagh and Lemkin's inspiration ought to put Mr. Wiesel in his place, if he's honest enough with himself.
Shavarsh

Of Course We Are A Superior People; Just Ask Us and We Will Confirm It
This is the most sarcastic, vulgar, and stupid sounding invective from an Armenian who has feelings of disdain and disgust for fellow Armenians yet.
Anonymous

It may interest you to know of the existence of the following museums before you go jumping to any conclusions:
Armenian Library and Museum of America (ALMA) in Watertown, MA
http://www.almainc.org/
Ararat-Eskijian Museum in Mission Hills, CA
http://www.ararat-eskijian-museum.com/
Armenian Museum in Fresno California
http://www.armenianmuseumfresno.org/
And the planned The Armenian Museum in Los Angeles, CA
http://www.theam.org/

"If the Jews in Nome, Alaska, were to announce that there was to be a Holocaust Museum in their city, how many minutes would it take after the announcement for the fund-drive to be over-subscribed?"

Don't you mean, how many minutes would it take for the government handouts to start pouring in to fund it?
Anonymous

I can take criticism but no cynicism.
V.

Thank you very much for writing this, there is someone else with good opinions out there…It’s about time we take our head out of our … and do something for our cause and for our people, but I don’t think that will happen anytime soon; we are too busy thinking we are superior than everyone else.
Arno

Help Needed for a Two-Champagne Problem

My good friend Andy Kevorkian can be very perceptive and very interesting to read as a reporter. However his assessment of HR106, I think, with all respect, completely misses the point, as he usually does with slightly more complicated political matters. He just sticks to the domestic and US inter-Armenian politicking around HR106 rather than the international and legal aspects and consequences of (even a “tabled”) HR106. Armenia and Armenian interests are completely absent in his very limited equation.

I think the most relevant paragraph in Andy's commentary is where he deals with the Turkish State's mobilization of all its resources to defeat HR106. One should ask what did the Armenian Government do when Turkey was doing all this? Nothing! The next question should have been if nothing then what is the difference between 2007, or post 1992/Independence and especially post victory in Artsakh, and 1915-23, or the Paris Conference, the Berlin Conference, or when The Sevres Treaty and the Lausanne Treaty were being signed?

Are we, as a people and a nation, still helpless and "oppressed minorities just appealing to the 'Great Powers' to come and rescue us", one might add, as Khrimian Hayrik did, with "our paper ladle" – in Armenian "mer sherepe tghtic er"? Or do we have a state, a real state (which has scored very important victories against the Turks to our East, preventing genocide there despite at best "Great Power" indifference and in reality overt hostility)) which has debated this issue at the state level involving the whole nation – including the Diaspora- and worked out its unshakable and real de jure position (not just a token "international recognition of the Genocide")? Why not?

What are we waiting for? How long are we going to treat this most important national issue as an academic scholarly issue for various university departments or an international "loves me loves me not" game whether this or that parliament will recognise the Genocide or not!
Bagrad Nazarian, London

I had a hearty laughter; a deep satisfaction reading Mr. Kevorkian’s article. It is brief and to the point with the right cynicism and the right touch without hurt, but with a pinpoint full of wit and nuance. I just loved it. Thanks for writing it for me, for us, since I am busy writing a book, henceforth lacking disposition and time to respond. In any case I wouldn't have his talent and way of approach. Thanks and bravo. Please tell Mr. Kevorkian if he still has his champagne, he can bring it over to Zurich, we can still drink for all surviving Armenians from such unfulfilled promises! Is it love, loyalty or stupidity????!
Dalita Iskenderian Alex, writer, Zurich, Switzerland.

Armenia, Landscape & Orphans of Armenia (poems)

Wow! I didn’t know there were Armenians in Argentina. I am happy to know Armenians live in Latin American countries. I wish their population grows.
Sameerah Annisah El Zougbi Fadl, Mexico

Other

I would like to point out a very vital issue that our community’s children face daily with their parents’ old attitudes, and create very serious tragic consequences! Years and years of abusive behavior of husbands towards their partners leads wives to wish that their daughters don't get married with their own Armenian counterparts. Young girls say, "I wish I had had no father", and without any second thoughts they start to date and want to get married with non Armenians.

We mostly concentrate on our past to bring justice to our people, but we ignore our children's future by leading them away from their Armenian roots. I am witnessing our young growing up without proper leadership.

In my opinion during community gatherings, such as in Churches, schools and in any other events we must speak about this subject with organized leadership. Families must be taught how to correct and adjust their attitudes for the sake of their children's success to grow up as Armenians.

Nigohos Beranian

 

The following are some of the comments about the various items posted in Keghart.com. They are the opinions expressed by readers who solely are responsible for posting them. Remarks that are off topic, defamatory, obscene, abusive, threatening or invade privacy are removed. The right to post partial, some, all or none of the submitted materials is reserved. Comments are not live and will be published irregularly.  We apologize for any inconvenience.



Scream Bloody Murder?

The only reason to 'Scream Bloody Murder' about an event is if that event needs to be screamed about. If Christiane Amanpour chose to scream about the incomplete genocides, i.e. the Holocaust, Rwanda, Cambodia…, then she wasted her time. No need to scream there, because everyone has already heard.

To the few who wonder what I mean by 'incomplete genocide', I remind you that according to Lemkin, genocide's last phase, that which completes it, is Denial of Genocide.

Therefore while the Holocaust, Rwanda and Cambodia are forms of genocide, the only currently true genocide is that committed against the Armenians. Amanpour's political maneuverings in this show bring her dangerously close to obfuscation of the one true genocide. This not only means she has wasted her time, and voice, in this 'Screaming', but she came close to participating in the final stage of the one true genocide. Any hand given to any phase of genocide is, by definitiona, a hand of a genocidaire.
Berge Minassian, Toronto 12/6/08
Where is Hay Tad, Tashnag, Ramgavar and the so called Armenian Congress, not to mention all the Armenian Lobby groups in the U.S. We may write blogs or individual emails to CNN. For as long as we do not show teeth through a strong organized representation we are nobody.

The Turkish propaganda works, because they are organized and they have dedicated system to oppose anything that brings up the matter of the Armenian Genocide. We should have had an official press communiqué ready and out within minutes after airing this CNN nonsense. Did you see such an official  communiqué addressed to Ms. Amanpour? If there is such a thing from any of our parties, officials, etc …then please accept my apologies. If not, then do not blame the Turks for being one step ahead of us!

Until such day that we have not  become one organized party fighting for all Armenians, and continue to be a portion of tashnag, a portion of ramgavar, a portion of hentchag, a portion of Antelias, a portion of Etchmiazin, we will never progress in our cause!

No one should take this personally; it is democracy, and I am expressing only my humble opinion!
 
A concerned Armenian, Montreal 12/6/08

Bravo!

As long as we are fragmented we are nobody; damned right you are! We have not as yet learned to do team work properly, exceptions granted.

Gaytzag Palandjian, Florida 12/12/08
 

Other

Minister of Culture of Armenia did not attend the Conference in Baku

Today's news has it that Ms. Hasmik Poghosyan, Minister of Culture of Armenia did not participate at a conference organized in Baki – that's the way they write and pronounce Baku. It was carried under the auspices of a British diplomat who talked at length with the interlocutor – I was watching one of many Armenian Channels of LA. I  quote  him, "I  am sorry  Armenia  did  not  send  its  representative over.”  The theme at said conference was preservation of Azeri   historical monuments, now being “destroyed” by the Nagornyi Karabagh Armenians.
Some nerve!!!  Witness the destruction just a few years ago of thousands of Armenian Khatchkars in Julfa. Nothing was said about these when Armenians protested from all corners of the world. Here I would like to   interject one, only one clever and sharp-minded Armenian – no, not exactly a politician but probably like self, an activist. At a live TV discussion that was being televised from Armenia's H1 channel at that juncture of time, he heatedly defended his opinion and shouted at  the top  of  his lungs, "This  minute, this  minute  our participants – at  the OSCE MINSK organized  so called  peace  initiatives/meetings with the counterpart  Azeris – should  leave until  they  stop  this  barbarian  act  and ask forgiveness."  No one heeded him.  
When in Yerevan I enquired a friend who this man was, and expressed my wish that I wanted to shake hands with him. My Armenian friend in a dismissive way said," He is a Marxist." “So what!”  I retorted.  “Let  him be  a  Maoist  for all that matters; he  is  a capable  person  and  correct  in  his  judgment”. I  added, "You don't go around  judging  people  by what ideology they profess; if he first and foremost  puts  Armenia's interests,  security  and  well being above all, then he is a true Armenian. 
Back to the news – it is commendable that Ms. Poghosyan, our Minister of Culture – and by extension, our Government and National Assembly – disapproved going to Baki. By the by, have the Azeris come to ask forgiveness for what they did in Julfa? The question is to that Mr. Inglese, who probably underestimates our, albeit  small State/Nation's ability to  at  least  now  start  to evaluate correctly what is at stake  and counteract against  ugly  articulations.
 
Hamahaigagani SIRO,
Gaytzag Palandjian, FL USA/Spain California, 12/4/08
 

Request, Prayer to all Armenians in the Diaspora

It is evident that during the next couple of months, international political and historical developments will take place in the region of South-Caucasus. The actual truth of the Armenian Genocide, which is the most sensitive issue for the whole Armenian nation, will not only go unrecognised, but its very existence will be on the table of negotiations which are already being put into place.
Every day, we read numerous political analyses about these questions and all of them deserve our respect.
I hereby wish to pass over the Armenian Government’s position on our Genocide which was the 20th Century’s first Genocide.
Thus, I consider that the sacred duty to face this problem and defend it by struggling for its recognition belongs to the Armenians in the Diaspora.
Therefore, I request and implore – to avoid working in a partisan way – that each organisation should not try to resist the “storm” by taking action on its own.
As one people, one nation, let us form a responsible Body.
I address my request to all religious and clerical, big and small, communities, be it Evangelical, Roman Catholic or Armenian Apostolic, to all political parties active in the Armenian Diaspora, with all their respective affiliate branches, political, benevolent or charitable, cultural, sportive, etc. all of them, so that no one can later complain and say: “why were we not invited to participate?… ”.
Thus, by combining all their efforts together, let them adopt a general strategy and decide on the tactics which will enable them to work in a complementary way. The task should be entrusted to an executive body formed by a few skilled persons, representative of all participants.
My request is that if we believe that this holy mission belongs to the Armenians of the Diaspora then we do not have the right to lose time. Let us not plunge ourselves in small unimportant particulars such as who of the initiators of this action will get the credit. To speak about honours or credit at this moment is ridiculous. The responsibility belongs to all of us without exception.
If not, I would not wish that the words expressed, tens of years ago, by Avedis Aharonian fall upon us as a curse:
“If all the suffering we endured is one day forgotten by our children, let all the shame of the world fall on the Armenians”.
Sincere best wishes.
Varoujan Knouni
e-mail: [email protected]
Athens, October 31, 2008.

Why is the picture of the sacred cave monastery of Geghart associated with political views? I wish you could find another image to represent peoples' views and let the beauty remain in peace Thank you for hosting this page.
Anonymous 10/6/2008


Petition, No; Boycott, Yes
Nov. 30, 2008     
From: Bagrad Nazarian

To: Several People

First the petition and now this (call for total blockade of Armenia!) and still continuing with mindless idiocies put out by that Bruce Tasker character. It just goes to show that Haykakan Jamanak has found its match in Canada.
With this particular article by Andy Kevorkian (you remember him from your 2003 UK lecture tour I hope) perhaps someone should remind him and Geghart that they’re really far behind Turkey and Azerbaijan, because much worse than what they’re prescribing, i.e. petition and boycott, has been actively and aggressively practiced by Turkey and Azerbaijan for years/decades: namely the blockade (so far failed) and the attempt to destroy Armenia! And I know as a matter of fact [… he] has not “invested” even a penny in Armenia and the thought of even visiting Armenia just once has never entered his […] head!
What fools!

Regards, Bagrad
PS: Is there any concrete report about the journalist who got beaten up? Any evidence as to who he is, who beat him and why?

Dec 01, 2008
Dear Mr. Nazarian,

Thank you for your note.I wonder whether you would like me to post your comment in the Visitors’ Section.Thank you for your attention.

Dikran Abrahamian
Dec 3, 2008

Dear Mr. Abrahamian,
Thank you for your kind offer to publish/post my comment in the Visitors’ section of Keghart. Some result at last! Considering you have chosen to ignore completely my many other critical comments. Please go ahead!
May I also point out that it is an unfortunate fact that journalists across the world are murdered on regular basis but when it comes to starting petitions and boycotts in support of (harassed, assaulted, violated, murdered, etc.) journalists it might be a good idea for you to do such for Turkey where journalists (and publishers and other free thinkers) are prosecuted and persecuted, beaten up, harassed, murdered, etc. as a matter of daily routine. Hrant Dink, unfortunately, is just one example of this.
After all with Canada being a member of NATO and neighbours with the greatest NATO country across the border supporting Turkey (namely USA), such petitions and boycotts might carry a little more weight against the biggest NATO bully, namely Turkey, who just happens to be our (Armenia’s) biggest neighbour with not much love lost for us, to put it mildly! Secondly may I emphasise that Artsakh, as an unrecognised territory, has no access to any international funds and finance from the World Bank, International Monetary Fund (IMF), the European Bank for Reconstruction and Development (EBRD), to mention but a few. Not only that but even big international charities are also reluctant or unable to invest or have a presence in Artsakh due to the assumed “instability” and “unstable” political situation or confusing borders, not to mention hyped up corruption and chaos, etc. charges.
Your petitions and calls for boycotts, not to mention Bruce Tasker type mindless “articles” only add to the misconceptions and confusion, potentially depriving our patriots in Artsakh (and by extension in Armenia) valuable resources, something which, as I have pointed out previously, Turkey and Azerbaijan have attempted to do through blockades and other aggressive behaviour well known to you.
Finally when it comes to fighting corruption, another unfortunate but undeniable reality in Armenia, I much rather follow the advice and example of Baroness Caroline Cox with whom I have had the privilege of travelling to Armenia and Artsakh on several occasions. Her personal, admittedly sympathetic but nevertheless, I believe, wise and experienced advice to those who have expressed their loud and often exaggerated “frustrations about corruption in Armenia” has been: “You Diaspora Armenians have a duty to come and get involved and teach them your business western experience and fight any manifestation of corruption by example. What are you waiting for!? What good is there waiting until everything has been sorted out which will be sooner or later”.
Let me point out, as someone with a modest investment in Artsakh since 2003 – and regular visits since 1994 – that my experience of “corruption” in Armenia/Artsakh has been minimal but nevertheless uncompromising with very positive outcomes overall. So I have found the Lady’s advice good, practical and spot on accurate.
 

Best regards,
Bagrad Nazarian
PS: I take the liberty of copying Lady Cox into this e-mail as I have made a reference to her here.
 
 

Karabakh?Genocide – The Deception

[…] Geghart started well and still has a great deal that's good. But for Geghart to give such prominent and uncritical space to such obvious nonsense and blatantly anti-Armenian propaganda is extremely worrying and unwarranted. If this is done in the  name of "freedom of expression" then clearly Mr Tasker has the complete freedom to speak as much […] as he likes as no one in Armenia ("the Kocharian/Sargsyan regime", etc.) seems to limit his freedom to talk nonsense, but why should Geghart so consistently allocate so much valuable space to spread the said poisonous pollution/nonsense? What is the point of it? If it is space that you need to fill with a certain quota of “Kocharian/Sargsyan regime”, etc., etc., blind hatred nonsense then, may I suggest that you simply translate into English and publish far more superior and sophisticated quality hate literature and big lies produced at Haykakan Jamanak stables rather than Mr Tasker’s amateurish but pompous endeavours.

Bagrad Nazarian, London
11/23/08

Bruce Tasker [….] knows so little about what actually is in the minds of near seven million Armenians.  He keeps grinding his [outdated] axe over and over again: that Hayastan, Nagornyi Karabagh/Artsakh are about to be given away, [and] Hay Tad is also to be totally forgotten. [….] I ask him to look around and see what the majority of the Armenian people of Armenia and Artsakh think of ceding even a palm of Armenian liberated territories. Instead of talking about our demand from Turkey for blood money, thousands of churches/monasteries destroyed, […]death marches, [he] imagines that we have forgotten all and will give away land [under] pressure from the Yankees or the Ivanoviches. We know our lesson well, rest assured.[…] Not an inch of land will be ceded. I cordially ask the OSCE Minsk group to go on peace making missions to Ankara, not Artsakh, [which] is independent and will never negotiate its liberty with any power.

Armen Araratian
11/21/08

Deception is the core attribute of politics. Whoever is not deceptive he or she is not a very good politician. I value Kcocharian/Sarkisian's regime. Mr. Tasker is aware of diferences between an agremment/declaration/Treaty. What was signed in Moscow was a declaration between parties which is not binding, in any way, [on] Karabakh. Remember, Armenians are not a tribe that their leader can decide their future for them. Those days are gone. Today, Armenia and Karabakh are strong enough that their enemies have declared, at least on paper, to deal with them peacefully. In fact for more than 14 years Azarbaijan has not been able to retake [the] so called lost territories. As to bribing our leaders, I think, it is nonsense speculation, because no one can bribe all Armenians.
The only way Azerbaijan can realize its oil dollars is security and peace with Armenians. That is why Azerbaijan pushed to obtain [a] peace declaration with Armenia through Russia.

Papken Harutunian 11/19/08.
 

A Turning Point: Armenian Officials Take the Bold Steps

One of the best articles I've ever read so far.

Sarkis Karapetyan, 11/19/08

The situation in Artsakh at this moment is not hopeful. First, there is not one single country that recognizes the republic, not even Armenia. Secondly, the Armenian people can't afford another war, neither physically nor financially. As we all know, we don't have huge oil fields like the Azeriz do. The third fact is that our enemies Israel and Turkey are continuing to sell enormous heavy weapons to Azerbaijan […] The Jewish people were kicked out from Eygypt, Spain, Portugal, Germany, Palestine, Russia etc. Armenians have allways protected them. Examples: when the Arabs were trying to massaccre the Jews in the old city of Jerusalem, the Armenians opend the gates of the Armenian monastery in Jerusalem to give them a safe passage through the Zion Gate to west Jerusalem; when the Russian Tsar was planning to massaccre them because they were not christians, the Armenian people gave them refuge in Armenia where they are staying until today; after being [driven] out of spain the Armenian merchants helped them to do business in Europe. Unfortunatly, instead of being thankful, Israel is trying to destroy our nation by selling arms to our enemies, robbing us from our lands  in Palestine, fighting against the recognition of The Armenian Genocide etc. this is really beyond human imagination.
The Turks are doing exactly the same. They came to our country, massaccred us, robbed us from our land; they are selling weapons to our enemies and denying the Armenian Genocide
 
It's true that Obama will try to respect his promisses to the Armenian people, but unfortunatly some of his top advisers will do anything in their power to mislead him.

Nicolai Romashuk Hairabedian,11/19/08.
Obama’s Election Forces Turkey To Rethink its Demands from Armenia

Turkey has a definite strategy in reaching the American communities, lawmakers, including the next president. The Armenian Diaspora needs to redefine, educate, energise its base, focus its mission, and activate its full ressources if its goals and vision are going to be realized. The time is now!
Alain, USA, 11/19/08
 

A Letter to a Friend – Why the Silence and Inactivity?

I just got back from a tour of Armenia with my family. My first time there and a life time dreamcome true. I had an opportunity to speak to many individuals, albeit in my Malatiazi western Armenian.  It surprised me that the locals in Yerevan thought that Americans DID NOT support the Genocide issue! Where did they get this notion from? I rationalized that perhaps they thought if Pres Bush was against it everyone in the US was also, including Armenian Americans. I asked several people whether there was any truth to Armenian Gov't officials caving in to Turkish pressure on the Genocide issue. Most Gov't workers and semi officials either said no or claimed ignorance. Most of the people on the street and especially most cab drivers ( super down to earth individuals) said they were afraid so. I was shocked and quite furious to say the least. This matter does not belong to the Gov't in Yerevan alone. Invariably it wasn't their parents and grandparents who were slaughtered, it belongs ever more so to us whose parentage was from Eastern Turkey. Local ARF officials with whom I've shared my observations have indicated that these recent rumors are troubling to them as well and if the matter appears to becoming reality, the ARF might pull out of the coalition Gov't.

Michael Mirakian, Palisades Park NJ, 11/14/08

Your letter is not for unity but to divide the communities.The amount of work done by ANC is beyond your understanding. You are against them because they are not sharing your ideas of destruction of the Armenian government. We know the opposition’s leaders and how much money they received. We are not passive and silent community. We are very active and vibrant but sorry we are not sharing your extreme and dangerous ideas
Anonymous 11/14/08
It's not only "The Silence and Inactivity". The truth and the answer is that the Armenian political parties, if not all of them, at least most of them are corrupt and divided. […………] The ARF is satisfied because it has ministerial posts [……] The Henchaks and the Ramgavars are all so divided; it's sad to see their hopelessness, but of course because of their members they are stronger than individuals. The [saddest] part of the Armenian political parties is that all their leaderships are corrupt. The question is, by whom? Who are the dark powers who are in a position to [influence] the Armenian political parties? The answer is, the same people like always and everywhere.
Nicolai Romashuk Hairabedian,11/14/08.
.
Armenia’s new Vasaks are now in action of a great black treason. When our president and the foreign Minister shamelessly declared that they are going to drop the issues of “Genocide” and “Occupied territories” from their negotiations, and in the mean time our so called political parties kept their silence, it shot my blood pressure up to the verge of having a heart attack!The way I see, all our political parties and denominations have sold their souls to the Satan, and our Diaspora to the Dollars. I am terribly worried but try to be somewhat upbeat. So long as we have dedicated patriotic people, there will be room for being optimistic. Remember that TRIUMPH comes from lots of TRY and UMPHs. Let’s not forget that during the black years of 1914-1915 the silent and inactive ones perished, whereas the active ones pulled through. May God bless you, and your family for undertaking your heavy and unappreciated burden. My late wife and my children have gone through all those hardship and sufferings, without expectation of any recognition and or appreciation, even from my ex own ARF party. What my family and I have done for our community during the past 46 years in Sydney, would be like a drop of rain in the ocean, compared to our various dedicated national heroes and patriots. In the past ARF was pointing fingers to Levon Ter Petrossian. But, “ Why the(ir) Silence and Inactivity” now?
Mack Vahanian, Sydney, Australia 11/13/08
Your article is a very simplistic analysis of the situation and generalizes extensively to fit its theme. If I had received this article right after the election, I would have given it some thought. This topic has already been exhausted post-election and many articles have been written around this topic. I would appreciate if we concentrated on issues our country faces at the moment, for example the financial crisis and the food crisis.
Etienne kechichian, 11/12/08

Thank you so much for a clear and unbiased picture of the situation in Armenia and a report of the organizations in Canada. I was not aware of those organizations. The Armenian communities have been too complacent following
leaderships, that should actually be criticized rather than following them blindly. The situation in Armenia is even worse with the human rights violations. This why the more educated generation has been alienated from those communities, at the expense of creating an honest and vibrant young community.
Betty Hagopian, Toronto, 11/11/08

Apathy towards recognized organizations? Is the government of Armenia part of these organizations? Was this the first fraudulent election?  Get real and be serious about your judgemental tone of discourse. Did you forget the 2000 US elections and the resulting 8 years of horror? We Armenians enjoy our independence of mind so much that we will not accept any opinion other than our own. We will not accept authority  under any form or shape. I will not delve myself to explain why we in the Diaspora and in our country are shaped like this; you probably  know it too well. Give the country and its government a chance.

Hratchia 11/11/08.
Where is the Beef?
You are obviously too long and too far from the actual Armenian political scene to understand how things are now done in Armenia, when you say "ultimately, it’s the authorities and people in Armenia that will decide what path will be drawn for the future".
The people of Armenia have absolutely no say in the development of Armenia, especially when it comes to matters regarding Armenia's neighbours, discussions of which are all conducted in secret by Sargsyan and his cronies, today namely Eduard Nalbandian and Tigran Sarkissian. Have no doubt that agreement on the Genocide commission has been reached in New York, and agreement on the surrounding territories has been reached, and if not already signed, will be signed immediately after the 15th October.
The plan to return the surrounding territories has been in preparation for several years, now compounded by the Genocide agreement, under pressure from Gul and Aliyev, who have long been working very closely together, knowing they can take advantage of Serzh’s greed. The Sargsyan regime, in close cooperation with Kocharian, will be picking up a minimum five Billion Dollars for their betrayal of the people of Armenia, and the Diaspora has not lifted a finger to stop them!!
Bruce  9/27/08

Politics or economics, is said, makes strange bedfellows. Question then remains: does Armenia need a strange bed fellow? Asking Turkey to remain neutral regarding Karabagh, is like pleading with a fox to preserve the integrity of the coop. Sooner or later temptation entices even the best disciplined wills; and Turkey is known to be a wily and willful wolf under the sheep's skin.
Armenia has already ceded to foreign marauders part of its vital resources. She doesn't need new devious carpet-beggars. Better keep your doors closed and sate yourself with your own "Pilaf", than open them wide, and be slowly poisoned by "Turkish Delight".
The Black Sea is still black, and let us be aware of the so-called "new" scholars. "Plus ça change, plus c'est le même", and Turkish historians no matter how "new" or enlightened, rather pander to their black side, than to illuminate the truth.
We, at the Diaspora, urge the leaders of Armenia to exercise good common sense and caution before they tread Turkey's murky détente proposals. Let us hope they try to find out ahead of time what sort of, or how many minarets Turkey has in mind to don with the Etchmiadzin.
Gomidas Jibelian, MS, PhD 9/17/08
A good, balanced article.
Sevan
 


Why I Cannot Be a Conservative

Viken insults the intelligence of Armenians with this dubious article. As someone who studied in  Czechoslovakia during the time when the country was under a brutal soviet fascist regime, Viken surprises me with his Michael Moorish nonsense that he spews. His arguments about the recent financial crisis in the US are totally rubbish. He purports the collapse of "fully" free markets as proof that the idea of individual freedom and self reliance are aberrations and not states of being we should  strive for. In other words let's have Big Brother take care of all of our needs since we the people have no thinking ability of our own and to hand over our individual rights to the elitists whose doctrines were sculpted by "heroes" such as Stalin, Trotsky, Lenin and in more modern times Castro and Chavez. Did he not read anything about the burden placed on the "free market" by the practice of socio-engineering enforced by organizations like ACORN with the full support of Democrats. All in the name of the "pulic good". I would not call radical actions such as death threats to bank managers and CEO's to force them to extend loans(mortgages) to high risk clients as an exercise in a free market. This was supposed to be for the public good. Well it sure didn't turn out that way as we now know all too well. That is why I cannot be a Liberal Fascist.
Dikran Piliguian, Toronto 10/24/08
I have recently read the comment of Mr. Dikran Piliguian on my essays. I would like to thank him for responding and making his voice be heard. He is certainly not indifferent. Here are my counterarguments:
1. Judging by the date of his comment, he has not read part III. All three pieces belong together and are meant to build the theoretical framework of analysis, from the more general to the more specific. Commenting on the whole before the work is complete is at best ill-advised. Mr. Avedis Kevorkian has made the same point that I am making. That would be like clapping, or in this case booing, after only one movement of a musical work is heard. If anything, it is a comment on the clapper and the booer, not the orchestra. Having said this, I would welcome Mr. Dikran Piliguian to build the counterargument to my position and to cite all the necessary examples and sources and let us have a good debate on the topic.
2. To the accusation that I have studied in Czechoslovakia, I plead guilty. The argument however that this somehow makes me a Stalinist or a Communist is more than flimsy. I have never hidden where I studied and in fact I have written about the experience in my blog. I have also studied (and taught) in France and have studied (and taught) in Canada (mainly Quebec, but also Manitoba). Does that make me a Gaullist or a follower of the Bloc Quebecois? Mr. Piliguian's argument would lead us to conclude for example that the numerous Armenians in various fields such as medicine, engineering, teaching and so on, who number in the thousands and have studied in Soviet Armenia and are now arguably in various positions of authority and leadership in the Diaspora are somehow all KGB moles and closet Stalinists. He is of course free to believe whatever he wants and I will defend his right to have that belief. But, if one agreed with Mr. Piliguian's line of reasoning, and along similar lines of argument, one should conclude that because someone studied in the US, for instance during the Vietnam war, that he/she somehow condoned that war, or worse even approved of the My Lai massacres.
3. Mr. Piliguian has obviously read what I write since he knows so much about me. My work is on public record, including my work for Armenian and non-Armenian human rights issues. I know who I am and what I have done and I have not changed much from the times I was in Czechoslovakia, or even earlier. At that time I was involved in defending the rights for freedom of expression of artists and writers in Communist Czechoslovakia. As a foreign student who enjoyed certain immunities (i.e. I could not be jailed, merely deported), I was involved in distributing the works of "banned" writers, which included Milan Kundera and Vaclav Havel, who later became the president of the Czech Republic after the Velvet Revolution. I can name names and give contacts who can back up my claim. Since he has turned this issue into an ad hominem attack against me equating me to fascists and defenders of Castro, Chavez, Stalin and Lenin, I would like to ask Mr. Piliguian as to how many times he has personally risked his own personal future and under what circumstances to defend anyone's individual freedoms which he oviously so cherishes? I will publicly salute him if he can do so, because it would mean that we believe in similar ideals.
4. As for the comparison with Michael Moore, I feel extremely flattered although I think it is somewhat unjustified. Again because his argument is completely faulty. He says and I quote " as someone who studied in Czechoslovakia during the time when the country was under a brutal soviet fascist regime, Viken surprises me with his Michael Moorish nonsense that he spews". So the logic is as follows, I studied in a country during a time when it was under a "brutal soviet fascist regime" (giving him the benefit of the doubt for the exaggeration in the qualifiers) so that somehow makes me complicit, yet I surprise him by spewing nonsense worthy of Michael Moore. So if I am a Communist/Fascist and presumably so is Michael Moore in his books, why is he surprised? How is this connection made? The logical conclusion simply cannot be derived from the initial premise. I do not know Mr. Piliguian's field of expertise, but he cannot have studied mathematical logic.
5. Since he is attributing Leninism, Trostkyism, Stalinism and many other "ism"s to me, I can only conclude that this is for name-calling purposes. Any serious reader who knows his material knows how far apart these "ism"s are. In the eye of Mr. Piliguian, they might be equally reprehensible, but that would be like accusing a defendant in a legal case of one major crime, when he might be guilty of another (or not). One would not want to suggest that Conrad Black is guilty of first degree murder, although he might be guilty of first degree fraud. And no, this is not simply a matter for lawyers to know about. I would also suggest that he has not read my text carefully or completely enough, because any reader will immediately spot how I feel about Stalinists and Communist ideologues (or, in general, about any ideologues).
6. Arguing that the real reason for the collapse of the global free markets is because there was forced lending to non-credit worthy homebuyers would be the equivalent to suggest that
a) that lower income individuals should not be borrowing, therefore, for example, institutions like the Grameen Bank should not exist and have somehow caused this global catastrophe
b) that the rampant financial risk "securitization" and issuing of dubious derivative instruments that were in turn "sliced/diced" into other types of financial paper and then resold for more profit into hedge funds and so on had absolutely nothing to do with what happened and
c) that in fact great floods (financial collapse) are not due to decisions to do away with flood barriers (regulations) but are caused because of them. As they say in Armenian, varbed kogheh dan dereh kogh geh haneh – a good thief, will make the victim look like the thief.
I will let the learned reader be the judge as to who would qualify as a fascist. I do not claim that Mr. Piliguian is one. Therefore I agree with him. He is neither a Liberal nor a Fascist.
He is however very angry. He should be. Keynes was proven right and Milton Friedman now stands as the "naked emperor". There is nothing that can change that reality.
One does not need to be a rocket scientist to guess which one of the above two was his favourite.
Paregamoren,
Viken L. Attarian, Montreal 12/9/08

Congratulations on your masterful presentation of Canadian Politics.An excellent study. Not to be missed.It is a pleasure to read your essays.
Jirair Dervishian 11/13/08
With his three part series "Why I cannot be Conservative" Viken Attarian establishes himself as one of the leading intellectuals of international calibre. Some claim to see the holes in donuts, others the donuts, but Viken sees the realities of the world that surrounds us and presents them in a brillant analysis.
Hagop Angaladian 11/12/08

As one who sees the holes in donuts but not the donut, and as one who likes to pick nits, permit me to comment on two statements made by Viken Attarian.
Although SENATOR Joseph McCarthy gave his name to a nasty period of American history, he had nothing to do with Hollywood and any alleged Communists there. That was the despicable work of the House [of Represenatives] Committee on Un-American Activities (HUAC)–which, incidentally, started life in the 1930s and whose remit was to seek out Fascists in America!
America was not "founded upon the toil of slaves." True, there was slavery in the South, but it was the industrial North and–after the Civil War–the slaveless country that built up the infrastructure that made the country great.
Before thinking of commenting on the essay, however, I would like to read the rest of the installments to see where he is going with his interesting premise(s).
Except, that is, to say that all change must be resisted. If the challenge to the status quo wins out, it means that which was defended had passed its usefullness. However, if the challenge fails, it means that the status quo was valid. Therefore, it is possible for a person to be a conservative on one issue and a progressive on another.
Avedis Kevorkian Philadelphia, PA, USA
10/11/2008
As the author of this three-part essay, I take every comment related to this work very seriously. Particularly any comment published by the remarkable writer Mr. Avedis Kevorkian of Philadelphia. I have, so far, not read anything from him that has been uninteresting. I therefore anxiously await his feedback on the whole of the work.
Now that all the parts of the essay have been pubished and they have been generating interesting feedback, here is my comment on his comment.
a) On the issue of McCarthyism and the HUAC, I stand corrected. Mr. Kevorkian is absolutely correct. Furthermore, as its name suggests, the HUAC was an institution of the House of Representatives (Congress), and McCarthy was a Senator. I do however want to state that without the era and the "inspiration" of McCarthyism, the HUAC would not have been able to do its despicable deeds. But, since the HUAC was a Standing House Committee long after McCarthy was gone, he should not be the sole accused of shouldering the blame of the period. After all the HUAC has had other notable names
associated with it, including Richard Nixon as one of its members. This was after all also the "coldest" of the periods of the Cold War.
b) Slavery is usually associated with the American South and Mr. Kevorkian is right. However, the time period that I am describing is much earlier, i.e. it is the period of about forty to fifty years after the founding of the USA and during the early to mid 19th century. There was absolutely slavery all over the US during that period. My references to the time period was not AFTER the Civil War, but several decades BEFORE the Civil War when the intellectual foundation of Conservatism was being forged.
For example, it is a well known fact that Thomas Jefferson, one of the most influential of the Founding Fathers and arguably one of the greatest of the US presidents, an intellectual giant of his time, was a slave owner, and in fact he owned several slaves. At best, he was ambivalent towards slavery.
c) He is also right that it is possible to be Conservative and Progressive in certain issues. In fact, I go to great lengths in Part II of my essay into explaining how that concept has historically applied very well to Canadian Conservative politics all the way into the late eighties of the twentieth century.
d) My main disagreement with Mr. Kevorkian is in his second to final point. That all change MUST be resisted, and sort of let the "best man win" attitude. By that token, Socrates was wrong and his poisoners were right; Giordano Bruno was wrong and the Inquisitionary zealots who burnt him at the stake were correct; Galileo was wrong and the Catholic dogma was right (until John Paul II admitted that Galileo was right after all – over 3 centuries later); Hitler was right for having successfully suppressed the Warsaw Ghetto uprising and so on. The conclusion of his argument, if taken to the very
end, is that "might makes right". I cannot accept that conclusion.
And I am certain and hoping, that once he thinks of it in this light, he would find it unacceptable as well.
Paregamoren
Viken L. Attarian, Montreal, 11/14/08

Again, With the Dancing; Or, Will We Never Learn?
I will only dance when I see their signature on the documents……

That's why my friend I am an honest and sincere Republican and an admirer of my dear friend G.W.Bush, who stood up to Putin in Georgia, whose favourite philosopher is Jesus Christ, and not Monika Lewinsky, nor Hussein. Turkey will only accept the facts by sitting down with us, not America, not Russia, but with us………and as the day came for us to be Azad Angakh, and showed to the entire world that the Yerakouyn, was , is and will always be the flag of Armenia, the day will come when Turkey will sit across the table with our Armenian leaders, and discuss the issues…..and among those will be the genocide, and God willing maybe [getting back] Mount Ararat ………Dreams can come true.
Vartkes Ehramdjian, 11/9/08

If I were Obama, and deciding whether to recognize the Armenian Genocide, I would consider and weigh the following:

Pro: It happened.
       I said during the campaign that it happened
       Other countries (France, Canada, etc.) have recognized it and have not been hurt economically
       There's an active pro-recognition Armenian lobby
       Genocide scholars and historians in genral would back the recogition. So would major media such as
       The New York Times, The Washington Post
       It could bring Armenia to the Western fold and stop Russian penetration at north of Georgia
       Armenia would make more geographical sense as the route to the Baku-Ceyhan pipeline.
       Turkey can't blackmail America since it needs America far more than America needs it. Turkey needs
       America especially to gain entry to the EU and for support on the Cyprus issue, and for economic, military
       assistance.
       The Congress would support it.

Con: Create hostility with Turkey and mild resentment from Moslems and Moslem countries
       Hundreds of major US companies exporting to Turkey or with factories in Turkey would
       lobby against it           
       Unions and the right-wing in America would claim loss of jobs and exports at a crucial economic time
       The Republicans would oppose it
       AIPAC and the other Israeli/Jewish lobbies would oppose it
       The State Department would oppose it  
       Radio talk show (almost all far right) would campaign against it
       Wall Street would be against it  
       It could push Turkey eastward or closer to Russia. Turkey is already suspicous of US because we have
       created a de facto Kurdistan in northern Iraq.
       Whose voice weighs heavier? that of 70-million plus Turkey or 8-million Armenians?

I am sure the pro and con lists can be made longer.
Jirair Tutunjian, Toronto 11/9/08
It's not how long you can keep a champagne in a fridge, but how old is your champagne (years) a good one can last 15 years. It's wrong to say the older it gets the better it is. The question is will you, one day, open that bottle. wishful but hopeful, as Obama's logo hope is coming?

I always like reading you.
Antranik Chaderjian, Mississauga,ON 11/9/08
Karabakh Under the Hammer
I was particularly disappointed and disgusted to read Bruce Tasker's 2 pieces as I have known him from  around 1999 and have met him a few times in Yerevan. He is married to a local Armenian girl. He has told me he "came to Yerevan after the earthquake with Assistance" but has stayed behind. It’s a pity that even after 20 years of living in Armenia he speaks very little or no Armenian – and especially that he makes constant (proud?!) references to this fact in both his pieces. Apart from the extremely low quality of the work and the lack of any journalistic or analytical merit (reducing it to, in my view, hallucination, broad unfounded generalisations, speculations, hostile sniping at, cynicism and mockery of Armenia) his tone and entire language, not to mention his essentially anti-Armenian/pro Azeri (subconscious?) mind and sentiments, for someone who’s lived in the country for nearly 20 years and is supposed to be pro-Armenian (but not necessarily pro Armenian government) is mind-boggling. His reference throughout his “articles” to President Sargsyan  as “Serge”, in particular, is utterly unprofessional, preposterous and, in my view, arrogant and unacceptable. However for Geghart to publish it without any critical commentary, it just blows your mind out!
Bagrad Nazarian, London, 11/7/08
Armenia Slides In Global Corruption Rankings
The Kocharian government's Poverty Reduction Program and related legistlation was a sham. At the time, the government was under a lot of pressure and tried to appease the EU. Fast forward. So many years later, Armenia sliding down the Global Corruption Scale is no surprise either. The only light at the end of the tunnel seems to be the latest case about some southern officials, who were accused of stealing 1.2 Million US Dollars from the sate allocated funds for infrastructure.
According to the media, the whole department is charged and will be tried for graft and corruption and this time, the government seems to be serious. I hope that, charges laid will be successfully prosecuted and all parties found guilty will be punished with the full force of the law.
Haig Misakyan, Toronto
10/11/2008
Why? Why? Why?
These why? why? why? concerns have bothered most of us for many years. You had the foresight to crystalize them vividly. The real puzzle however is HOW? HOW and HOW? and by WHO? WHO? and WHO? Short of an action plan with tangible measures we will continue to spin our wheels. Please send me your e-mail address.

Hovsep Torossian, Detroit 4/2/08

America's Election
Avedis Kevorkian's passionate piece teaches us all, that in a democracy, we only get what we deserve as a collective. In a democracy, we lose because of our inactions, complacency and sometimes just plain laziness.
Democracy is messy, inefficent, it takes up a lot of our personal time, it requires us to engage our minds, it requires critical thinking, as well as analyses of issues, an engaged citizenry that is informed through a variety of diverse sources and more than an altruistic sense of the public good. In other words, to function, it requires a complex machinery that has many parts that need to work together. If one part fails, the whole thing can come crumbling down.
That is why a democracy is very vulnerable. That is also why a democracy is resilient. It takes a lot of blows to dismantle it.
On the other hand, we might have reached rock bottom and we might have too many broken pieces already.
Democracy has nothing to do with economics and commercial utilitarian choices, nor is it about market systems, like the grand "strategist"s of an uncontrolled and globally rampant approach based on greed will have you believe. After all democracy was invented by the Greeks in antiquity when none of these constructs existed. You don't believe me? Look at China and Russia and their market economies of today. Quod Erat Demonstrandum.
Market systems, at best (i.e. when they are honest and fairt, based on principles and regulations put in by the citizens) can only pursue efficiency and maximize the wealth of shareholders. At their worst, i.e. like right now, they pursue the same goals but use fraud, greed and other shady or downright illegal means to achieve them. Therefore, the sole distinction between the two, is only in the method, not the objective.
While I disagree that the Catholicos is elected by the people (or by their representatives), since I do not recall anyone ever asking my opinion about the Catholicossal candidates (perhaps because I am a baptized Catholic, but I know many Lousavortchagans who are in the same predicament), Avedis is right on about us having only ourselves to blame, whether as an Armenian, an American or as a Canadian. We can make choices about supporting ideas and a specific vision vs. supporting names based on tribal habits or because we want to protest a position we disagree with (like granting equal rights to women, immigrants, blacks, gays or whatever other group might be the target of our own intolerance).
There are many things done in our name. Including horrendous crimes such as fraud, embezzlement, murder, and even massive crimes against humanity.
Choosing to be silent makes us all complicit. Avedis Kevorkian is calling on all of us not to be.
And I thank him and his father for that.
Viken L. Attarian Mount Royal Quebec, CANADA
10/3/08
Armenian Genocide Issue Should Not Become A Political Football

Harout Sassounian clearly underestimated Sargsyan’s determination to establish the Genocide Commission, and to return the Karabakhi surrounding territories, and indeed it now seems Karabakh. In this article Harout emphasizes the political aspect of this action, which is of course important. But previously Harout was one of the few who attended to the financial benefits for the Armenian Republic, which is of course the prime priority for the Sargsyan / Kocharian regime.
The events in Georgia now influence events in the region, and Sargsyan has used that situation to bring his long-awaited plan to full implementation, and that will be initiated this week at the UN in New York.
Holocaust could cost 200 billion Dollars – Genocide Going for FREE
http://www.khosq.com/en-us/article/2008/09/23/holocaust_could_cost_americans_200_billion_dollars
Still Blowing the World Bank Whistle in Washington in the fight against corruption in Armenia
http://better-not-wb-the-wb.blogspot.com/
Bruce Tasker, Yerevan, 9/24/2008
Diasporan Money Corrupts Governments, Study Finds
Why do you bother to post any articles from Ara Baliozian or Avedis kevkorian? Both are super pessimistic, and jump at the chance to disrespect and throw dirt on Armenia and Armenians who support Armenia in the latters case. You claim this is done in order to better understand our situation, but in reality it only makes some less informed Armenians believe the rubbish and anti Armenian musings of these two misguided figures.
Ara tries to compare himself with the great Armenian writers, and since he is no where close to them he decides to hate the worldwide Armenian community, plus regurgitate the same mis-thoughts over and over again. While Avedis thinks he is looking out for Armenia by being so harsh he is actually only showing himself to be naive and overly critical. He thinks that since overnight Armenia didn't become the Switzerland of the region or that democracy hasn't been perfect or the big difference between the rich and poor of Armenia, that the Diaspora should punish Armenia by not helping it out. Well, that is like UN sanctions, it only hurts the common person, not the government.
And FYI, democracy doesn't even truly exist in America. We saw how Bush stole the election, and we see how democratic it is to always have to choose between the lessor of the two evils. I am of course referring to the two party system in the U.S. Excuse my language, but Republicans and Democrats are the same [… ] from different […]. About as much difference between them as there was among the bolsheviks and mensheviks. Also, the IMF study he pointed to is nice and all but does he realize that the IMF is another instrument of western (read) American hegemony and it was due laregly to the absurd policies of the World Bank and IMF that Russia was more or less run by crooks during the 90s, that Argentina was in deep economic trouble before they basically told the IMF where to stick it in 2001?
As for Avedis' comment about his homeland being here, if he means the U.S. or Canada then great, but stay the hell out of Armenia's affairs, if you do not view it as your country then do not criticize those who do view Armenia as their home.
If you can't stop posting the works of either of these two, at least do many of us a favor and begin to post the writings of Dr. Armen Ayvazyan, please! I would then maybe see the point of having Ara's or Avedis' writings, because the reader could at least see the lack of vision either of these men have.

Vilen Khlgatyan 9/25/08

Avedis Kevorkian only touches the surface. Avedis is absolutely right, remittances from the Diaspora are a central part in the corruption equation, and since the recent election , which he also rightly refers to as a farce, remittances have gone up dramatically, some estimate to between 2 and 3 billion dollars each year. Not only does this relieve the Government from their obligation to spend public funds on the public, as they should, it also provides spending power for the public to buy goods that are monopolized by Government cronies.
Moreover, with respect to the IMF (and the World Bank), Diaspora remittances help Very Nicely Thank You with the economic boom Armenia has apparently experienced through the Kocharian / Sargsyan years. If it was not for this massive per capita income, the Armenian economy would have collapsed long ago.
Bruce Tasker, Yerevan, 9/23/2008
Hello, Your article has been featured on Khosq.com (A new Sharing & Digging Site for Armenians) at http://khosq.com/en-us/article/2008/09/22/diasporan_money_corrupts_governments_study_finds
You can register with Khosq.com and share interesting and important articles and help promote your favourite ones so that it reaches broader audiences.
Best Wishes,
Garen – The Khosq.com Team – Yerevan, 9/23/2008
"Collapse" And How It Relates To Things Armenian
Your writing is always very interesting.
Shayen (Sahen) Tuntoglu 8/31/08

First the Genocide, Then the Vericide
President Sargsyan can no longer deceive the Armenian people, Turkey's Foreign Minister Ali Babacan confirmed that development in Turkey-Armenia and Azerbaijan-Armenia relations are expected after the Azerbaijani elections Oct. 15.
You can translate the development in Turkey-Armenia relations as the establishment of diplomatic ties and opening the borders and the development in Azerbaijan-Armenia relations as the progress in the solution of the Karabakh issue. The Foreign Minister announced that he would join Armenian Foreign Minister Nalbandian and Azerbaijani Foreign Minister Memetyarov in a tripartite meeting Friday in New York. Tomorrow we will witness a "first" in New York. Turkey-Armenia-Azerbaijan foreign ministers will meet together to iron out bilateral relations and to eliminate the dire strait in the Caucasus.
Bruce Tasker 9/25/08
The Caucasian Zimbabwe Makes it Personal (almost)
Since the operative word is "disgusting" in this essay, I shall liberally use it. Quite frankly I find it disgusting that "activists" seem to forget that such a sanction against Armenia is likely to further harm the general population and not the thugs in power. [….] In the liberal self-aggrandizement of a bone-headed "activist" is where we shall find such drivel. Even if a  thousand youth were beaten by 999 thugs, we have no right to call for sanctions against Armenia. Such obtuse minds need to do what is best for all of us: They need to stay the hell out of this matter altogether!
Hagop 8/29/08

Jirayr Sefilyan And Bigotry
There were tens of thousands of soldiers who fought for independence and Artsakh, thousands of them are driven to misery, and hundreds of them were exiled. How it comes that Diaspora reacts so strong only in one particular case? Only because Jirayr is a "Diasporan"? Do you think that is is OK to deport and annihilate "Hayastantsi" Armenians, but it is not OK in case of a "Diasporan". Where do you see the difference?
Vahe Avetian 8/1/08
Welcoming And Not Confronting (Comments in Armenian)
Hargeli hayer,
Arjanavor hay Tigrann stegtsel e hoyakap saite @[email protected], aysinqn gegecikn patrast e; Duq grum u kardum eq voch hayeren, vorn stegtsvel e miliardavor tariner arag: Es shat nyuter em ugarkel USA-i hayerin, hayeri lragirnerin, hnkerutyunnerin , nshelov, vor “irencic indz vochinch petq che”: Bayc miayn anbanneri lrutyann em vka egel:
Ekeq miasin xndrenq “GEGARD”-in , vor na bac ani mi dzri elektronayin post mer kogmic ugarkvats, hayeren tarerov grvats nyuteri faylern ev mi dzri elektronayin post, voum klinen mer ugarkats faylern (miayn arogj mardu arogj mtqerov) hayeren u bolors el k#kardanq cankacats fayln hayeren, qani vor kimananq posti gagtnagirn:
Guce bolors miasin ognenq “GEGARDIN” u ksksenq hayeren mtatsel sovorel:
Minchev ays mitqn irakanacneln es karog em im kogmic grvats haeren nyutern ugarkel dzer hasceneron – tpagrats, skavarakov, hamaspyurov:
Es hayeri het toneci AMANOR-I 12005 amyakn, isk duq? Sovoreq tsaxselu hachuyqn zgal, miasin qef anel tekuz hamaspyurov, hazar tari cheq aprelu:
Es angam aryan rak el em bujel, chnayats injener gitnakan em: Dimeq angam voroshaki hivandutyam bujman harcov, kognem, ete karoganam:
Hratarakum em hayeren “MTORUM” ev (herti e) “LSENQ IRAR” lragir – prakner: Duq el miaceq hayeren lezvov (tekuz masamb) mshakuytayin lragir stegtsel aranc radioyi, heracuyci, tegakan u ayl erkrneri lragreri nyuteri artatpman GEGARD- i gekavarutyyamb u boloris cankutyamb:
Es kkazmem lragir – praki elektronayin tesqn, PDF fayln u kugarkem Dzes skavarakn tparanin handznelu hamar , kmasnakcem naev dramov, ete duq chkaroganaq lriv havaqel 200 kanach hratarakman saxsn:
Hargeli Hayer vor hayn khaskana nerqevum bervats votanavori tesqov bervats mitqn u hogin otar lezvov targmanvats?
* * *
Chanpic ekats hognats quyrik
hangist qich ar mer motin,
snund ara qo poqrikin
u qund ar mer mahchin:
Ashxarhn mets, mardiq el shat
qez pes paxats xur kyanqic,
mez inch mi neg` qeznov ekats
ays len u bol ashxarhin:
Qnir hangist, du, mer mahchin,
mer tunn el halal lini,
guce kyanqid, balid chanpen
mer tanic noren kelni:
* * *
Haykakan asacvatsq
Tsar# tsur petq che aci,
vor armatnin cav chta,
ira ambogj qashi ujov
nranc tanjanq mi chta:
Aydpisin# qamuc shat shut
arnatahan klini u ansnund kmna,
armatiqn el aranc vordu
miayn chor payt kdarnan:
Lav e tsar#` teq bardzracats
shat vag qamuc kotrvi,
armatnerin vnas chta u nor tsil# kyanq ani`
ugig gtsov misht bardzrana,
armatnerin el uj ta:
Tsar u armat snund karnen
hogic, odic u jric,
mez el lav shuq u maqur od
misht el barevov kanen:
Tsar tnkelis ushim egeq,
vor hankarts tsur chgna,
armatnerin u mer kyanqin
miayn kyanq u jpit ta:
****
Erb vor Dzes HAY kzgaq, imac tveq, miasin kuraxananq, te che hayelin dzes inch asi? Hajogutyun bolorid kyanqi amen eganakin: Apreq urax irar uraxutyamb:
A. K.Aslamazyan, E mail – < [email protected] > Yerevan 9/4/2008
Other
Thank you for hosting this page. I appreciate all the work that goes into it.
Would it be possible to have a "Printer Friendly" option for those who would prefer to read a hard copy of the great articles you have?
Just a suggestion.
John
8/16/2008
Dear John,
Your suggestion is very timely. New featrures are introduced to the site every now and then. Hopefully the printer-friendly option will be implemented in the near future.

Thank You.

The Keghart.com Team

The Caucasus moment

The USA in my opinion does not want peace to keep our war machine going. Why do they want a missile shield around Russia? US is starting cold war, not Russia. Can you imagine Russia putting some missile bases in Cuba? We would do in our pants. Why was US silent  when initially Georgians attacked on South Ossetia? Is it because they are allies of US and can get away with it, killing women and children, raping, plundering houses? Where was our lyer leader Bush? Playing golf?
It's the same with our ally Israel getting all the military hardware to kill and destroy Palestine and Lebanon. What have these countries done to USA?  It's not right when Russia retaliates, but it's all right for US to invade Iraq.
Robert C. Paul (Poghossian)  8/20/08

Excellent article by a top, qualified politician.
Andre Chaderjian 8/31/08
The Drive to Secede: Georgian Provinces Likely to Join Russia
…. I don't think Russia will go to War until the next U.S. President gets elected "If this persists" which I doubt. United States is showing no respect to its adversary … When Russia was using Satellites to spy on U.S. America was sending planes, actors, writers, etc to spy on Russia. [Although] Russia had economic problems in late 80's and early 90's the military operations were ongoing and U.S knows this.
I reside in the United States and would not live anywhere else. I think people should have more freedom to choose what their taxes are being spent on and who we should go to War with if necessary, because it's quite obvious that the White House wants to spend money for relief purposes and on nothing else.
All this tension will pass when the White House starts taxing citizens and borrowing money from other countries.
Zhan Barsegyan, USA
8/21/2008
I was laughing at one of McCain's rhetoric demanding Russia to withdraw in order to still be part of the civilized nations. Where was America when the Russian Empire under Catherine the Great was running the whole place?
Lamoushka, Florida
8/20/2008
The war between the Russians and President Mikheil Saakashvili reminds me the cat and mouse game. How childish the Georgian President looks creating a mess for his country.
The Georgian President played Russian roulette with his own people, and the only help he gets is verbal ammunition from the West.
I hope Mr. Ter Petrosian finds out why Armenians outside the country did not support him as much as he wanted. Mr. Saakashvili and Mr. Ter Petrosian both are individuals who can be very dangerous for their own people; both are day dreamers and like color revolutions. Most hunters never pull the tail of a bear in deep sleep. It is a dangerous game.
Grish Begian, Toronto
8/19/2008
It's nice to read common sense articles among so much brain-washed clone regurgitations of lies.

The most glaringly obvious fact of our times is that the most powerful empire of Mammon has always attacked, all over the world, only the weak–therein lies its enormous but coward character matching its enormous terrorising power. During the World War II it entered during the last couple of years, after the crucial battle of Stalingrad. During WW I, despite its Ambassador's (Morgenthau) numerous communications concerning the Genocide of the Armenians in the Ottoman empire, it chose 'non interference', hence letting the butchers finish their job. No wonder our master poet Tcharents used to remind us that yes America might help us–it will help us open modern orphanages…

Hence, let's hope Diplomacy will prove more powerful than terrorising cowardice which abuses others to do its dirty job.

Meanwhile and after the courageous dismantling of the Warsaw Pact by the 'Russian bear', the bosses of 'free' Warsaw are chaining their fate with NATO Big Boss, opening the Pandora Box of nuclear genocide–NATO has now the nuclear first attack 'preventive' policy enshrined in its main objectives– while the non aligned nations, counting ca 120 nations, unanimously voted, including Iran,(and not for the first time) for a nuclear free Middle East…asking the Nuclear Non Proliferation watchdogs to deal with Israel's nuclear arsenal…

Khatchatur UK 8/20/08

Truth Was The First Casualty
Sireli Avedis,
Mi housahadir verche pari e.
Zohrab Atarian, Fresno
8/22/2008
A very refreshing analysis.
Andre Chaderjian, Canada
8/22/2008
Well, I have been clamoring everywhere that Armenians need to have a first-class top-notch diplomat, ready to expose the hypocrisy of the West and deal with it accordingly. Our mistake is to be always too harsh in our good deeds. In this World, you have to play a Game, and you have to know how to play it! That is what the Armenians need. That is the only way for us, Armenians, not to lose!
George Y. Krikorian, Orlando, FL
8/20/2008
Thanks for these articles. It was particularly refreshing to finally see an Armenian perspective. Had Georgia been successful, I wonder whether Azerbaijan would have been tempted to try to pull the same stunt in Nagorno-Karabakh?

Phil Brown, Nepean, Ontario, Canada 8/19/2008

A Wake Up Call to the Caucasian Armenians

I like meeting up with my perceptive friends for a cup of tea in a London cafe. And when that friend does not even … live in London, then I enjoy finding him in KEGHART, which in a remarkably short (very!) time has become one of the most un-missible publications on the global Internet – thanks of course to its Founder-Editor Dikran Abrahamian, obviously a most impressive Armenian intellctual….
I like exceedingly Avedis Kevorkian's coinage of VERICIDE – it deserves to be made a conceptual term of! with the proviso of a slight scholarly semantic emendation. "Vericide" etymologically derives from the Latin noun Veritas=truth, and the verb caedere=to kill; thus the ellision produces the meaning of "The Murder of Truth" (NOT "the death of truth" as Avedis has it)-
And better still, "The Genocide of the Truth" – very apposite to the "Lies, lies and damned Lies" (Disraeli's words), and the ENDLESS lies fabricated DAILY nowadays (on everything, and not only politcs!) in the Western newsmedia …
People who love lies love BO – Lies "stink up to heaven" (Claudius in Shakespeare's Hamlet)- Lies are turning our lives into raw sewage … A hundred years ago, before the British Victorians solved London's "The Big Stink" problem caused by the open sewage poured into the London river Fleet, prisoners in the neighbourhood prisons used to drop … dead of the Stink (before the Judges' rope got to their necks …) Soon, honest American citizens will drop dead in the streets, shocked by the stinking lies they are fed round the clock!
And finally, I wish somebody (Viken Attarian? Dikran Abrahamian? even Avedis Kevorkian?) could enlighten us why O why the Eastern Armenians have been so negligent in re-claiming their historical lands of Javakh-k and Nakhichevan (as they did Artsakh, thank God!) amidst the Caucasian Chaos – the boiling pot there is painfully but refreshingly steaming out the historical grime (not to say the deliberate genocidal filth) accumulated over the geophysical territorial errors of the Stalinist past …
Are the Caucasian Armenians in torpor, or too busy tearing each other apart like mafia-wolves for indecent Dollars, instead of acting in self-defence against their genocidal enemies …
There is every sign that the Caucasian pot shall go on boiling violently for a while, because of american neo-con politics.
Armenians of Javakh-k and Nakhichevan get cracking … find Khrimian Hairik's "iron ladel" instead of pursuing hopeless Petitions … and devalued Dollars!
Professor Hovhanness I. Pilikian, London
8/20/2008
Response to Prof. H. I. Pilikian

First, permit me to thank Prof. H. I. Pilikian for pointing out that “Vericide” is really the “Murder of Truth,” not the “Death of. . . .”  It doesn’t change the argument that the term be used, but it makes its use more precise.

As to the professor’s other comment that someone (he listed me among the someones) doesn’t explain why the Eastern Armenians have failed to claim the Armenian lands of Javakh (in Georgia) and Nakhitchevan (in Azerbaijan).

The answer is simple: No one gives a damn about the Armenians and, by extension, their “cause” and their grievance(s).

We saw what happened when the matter of the destruction of the cemetery at New Julfa was brought to the attention of the Council of Europe, of which Armenia and Azerbaijan are members.  The CoE did not condemn or otherwise criticize Azerbaijan but asked BOTH sides to respect the cultural heritage of the other!  Under American pressure, world bodies must pair Armenia and Azerbaijan and treat the two countries as a duality.  You will recall that Armenia’s admittance to the CoE was held up until Azerbaijan could be deemed to be eligible.  And, of course, USELESSCO, based in Paris, has done nothing.

Thus, any claim by Armenia for Nakhitchevan–now without Armenians and without any trace of their presence–would get nowhere.

As to Javakh, Prof. Pilikian may have a point, except that the hypocrites who govern the organizations that determine these things and “recognize” the rights of peoples take their lead from America, and America–as recent events have shown–feels it needs Georgia as a client state and would not permit any organization to even listen to an appeal, much less find in favor of the Armenians.

An Israeli friend once said to me, “If only God had given the Arabs the land of milk and honey and had given us the oil, things would be different.”  In the same vein, it can be said that “If God had given the Azeris the apricots and had given Armenia the oil, things would be different.”

No, Professor, do not criticize the Eastern Armenians for not starting an effort that is doomed to failure.

Avedis Kevorkian, Philadelphia, PA
8/27/2008
Language, Beauty & Memory Part III & IV
Viken, you are incredible. When I emigrated to Canada from Bolis, I had Raffi's Ghente, Khatchakoghi Hishadagarane and Gaydzere in my luggage and some other treasured books that I brought with me. Needless to say that half of the weight of my luggage were my books and the rest some clothing staff. To date, I keep my books. They are inseparable part of my soul.
Everytime I read your comments or articles, I learn something new or remember things, that for some reason or other had been left buried in a dark corner of my brain.
It is truly a pleasure to read your contributions. Please keep them coming.
Haig Misakyan, Toronto
6/2/08

I Fulfilled Your Words – Reliving Saroukhan
Once again, Hagop Angaladian shines with an amazing piece. Like a present Baronian and Odian
combined, he does not shy away from controversy and points the satirical finger at the modern day
khatchakoghs and their allies.

Angaladian transforms his personal tragedy into an awe-inspiring conviction. Reviving the famous
Saroukhan caricaturial volume of Des Khoskeret (See Your Words), he masterfully uses his own life-and-
death struggle into nothing short of a revolt against fate. Those who actually wish that he might go
away are in for a surprise.

The revolting behaviour of our latter day fraudsters has at least one redeeming value. It has given
us a new author.

And that is something very rare indeed.

Viken L. Attarian
Town of Mount Royal, QC Canada
5/31/09
A Loss of Balance on Israel
In her mini-essay, “A Loss of Balance on Israel,” Linda McQuaig shows that she, too, has lost her balance.
She is correct when she says that Canada (and, indeed, the rest of the UN majority in 1947) voted for two states in Palestine, and that Canada (and the rest of the UN majority) didn’t vote for what now exists in Palestine.
However, she, like all those who comment on the present situation (with a tinge of anti-Israel in their comments), fails to discuss the genesis of the present situation.
A good place to start would be to ask the question: “What would the situation in Palestine be like if the Arab nations did not make war on israel, in May 1948?”
There would be two UN-created states–one Jewish and one Arab. Jerusalem would belong to no one. The Jews, being Jews, would make their state what it is today–desert land now fertile land, an agricultural society now an industrial state, a backward land now a leader in science and technology.
There would be no refugee camps–which are a creation of the Arabs. The Arabs living in the israeli state would enjoy the benefits of Jewish progress.
What the apologists for the Arabs–the term “Palestinian” for the those in the camps was created after 1967–fail to concede is that the monster that exists was created by the Arabs.
For possibly the first time in (recent) world history, a displaced people–ignoring for the moment why they are displaced–could have gone to countries where they were familiar with the customs, the language, the mores, the religion, and could have been absorbed in an environment with which they were familiar. Unlike other displaced people who had to go to a hostile (unkind, not warlike) environment where they had to adopt to new customs, learn a new language, adjust to a majority religion. Think of the Armenians; think, Yes, of the Jews.
But, the Arab nations created the refugee camps–not Israel–so that the poor people who were encouraged to leave could be used as pawns in a cynical political game to make the Jews the villains. Probably, Saudi Arabia’s one-day’s oil income could make a paradise somewhere in the vast empty lands in the area for all the Arab refugees now living in the camps. But, the oil-rich Arab nations prefer to ignore their brothers and sisters, their co-religionists, and ratchet up the conflict and lay that conflict at the feet of Israel.
But, all the “what could have been” is conveniently forgotten, and people like Linda McQuaig lament for those who have caused the problem without suggesting that it is a self-imposed problem.
If tears are to be shed, shed them for the death of Truth.
Avedis Kevorkian, Philadelphia, PA
5/27/2008

Language, Beauty and Memory Part I & II
Viken, you beat both of them at their game. I truly enjoyed it.
Haig Misakyan, Toronto
5/24/2008
On The Armenian Love-Language
It is always a great joy to read Viken Attarian wherever one can encounter him – and I am glad nowadays he is frequently to be found at Keghart – not only for his content, but for sheer style – the guy writes so elegantly, as if English were his mother-tongue – one of a few Armenian intellectuals globally, who can beat the English at their linguistic games.
I do not wish to outrage any traditional Armenian 'holier than thou' Readers, by … playing chess with Armenian scientific Semantics – puns and linguistic games cannot and must not be inhibited by 'morality' etc.
Inspired by VA's highly original punning of 'srpa-zan-ts', I would like to record 'srpan' – the Armenian literary word for 'anus', which is a very beautiful Armenian construct from the verb 'srpe(h)l' meaning 'to wipe (off)' – which I think is, believe it or not, incredibly, the very same root for 'sourp' meaning 'sacred', viz. 'cleansed from all sins'!
Some of the precise Armenian equivalents of what is generally regarded as obscene in other languages, are of pristine beauty among the roots of the Armenian semantics – and we Armenians are the poorer for not employing them in civilized discourse.
For example, the Armenian word for F*** is one of the most beautiful and apposite among all Indo- European languages – 'kou-ne(h)l' derives from the root/verb 'kna-nal' meaning 'to sleep' (also in English polite discourse – 'to sleep together'), which in turn is cognate with the verbal root 'k-nal' meaning 'to go' (curiously, a metaphor in English for F***, stretching back to Elizabethans and even possibly further back to Chaucer), 'to wander off'… to sleep.
The Armenian words for the sexual organs is another case for lingusitic beauty – I have not worked out the etymology of the very beautiful word 'bou-ts' for the vulva, but I have no doubt whatsoever that the Armenian word for the male sexual organ 'g-lir' derives from 'g-lor' meaning 'round', the very literal illustration of the testicles, which in ancient lore was regarded to be of a single entity.
The discovery that 'it' was actually constituted of two 'eggs' was practically a 'modern' medical find – it may be argued that Leonardo da Vinci was the first discoverer of this fact, as a direct result of his anatomical studies based on the dissection of cadavres.
I better stop, before risking traditional Armenian ire exploding upon your Editorial heads – Christian Armenian ultra-nationalists think a true Armenian should lack any sexual organs …
Professor Hovhanness I. Pilikian
London, UK
5/17/2008

April 24 Triptych

Hagop Angalatian's "April 24 Triptych" is surely a shiny example of modern Armenian writing, which proves once again that, in spite of all the naysayers, language is the most important concept that relates itself to the Armenian identity. Even more, Angalatian appears as an author with a unique style that brings freshness and a call for a national awakening, without falling into the romanticism of a hopeless sentimentality.  It is not a sentimentality but instead, a sensitivity that, in turn,  works through the intellect, thus opening the reader's mind to new possibilities.

Angalatian's work is surely the result of the deeply-felt experiences of the cosmopolitan chronicler, but also a manifestation of his deeply-rooted Armenian identity.  In fact, it is the universal monument to the creators of that idenity, his parents and his teachers.

Viken L. Attarian, Mount Royal, QC Canada
Hi, A fellow Armenian Family History researcher pointed me to your website and this article. Very  unfortunately for me, I don't read Armenian! Don't suppose there's an English translation is there? I am interested particularly in the pictures and comments regarding the Armenian Church in Dhaka in the article. I have recently photographed and transcribed all the Armenian graves from this church,they can be seen on my website www.chater-genealogy.com, so your article has sparked my interest.

Many thanks and best wishes.
Liz 5/17/08
Commemoration of the 93rd Anniversary of the Genocide of Armenians in Istanbul
I salute the commemoration of the Genocide of Armenians in Istanbul. It is a wise and courageous step to have the Turkish intellectuals get involved to know the true history of the region.
I, a son of the Genocide survivor feel myself a Native of this country now called Turkey. My Armenian ancestors were
living here more than three thousand years; it's proven historically, culturaly and relegiously. All history books of neighbouring countries recognise Old Armenia from Mt. Ararat to the Mediterranean Cilicia.
It is about time for honourable educated Turks to recognise that the Armenians were the original people of this country and stop denying the Genocide for the benefit of our two peoples to live together in harmony in future.
Bablan Oghlo, Urfa, Turkey
4/28/08
This is impressive. Astvadz hokinere lousavoreh.
Hye 4/30/08

A Tribute to Vartan Oskanian
I know him personally since 1983. Nobody is denying Mr.Okanian's value as a diplomat; but his mildness in response to the destruction of the Nakhichevan Khatchkars was reproachable. A prime occasion was lost by not suing Azerbaijan and asking billions of Euros in the Hague International Court. At the same time it would have given an opportunity to demonstrate that before annexation of Nakhijevan 60% of the population was Armenian, whereas today only 0.1%.
Souren Dermelkonian, Montreal 4/28/08.
Tribute to Ambassador John Evans
Dear Berge

I read your article with interest.
I agree that Mr Evans is an ambassador of Armenia in USA.
But forgive me to my question as many possible groups are in my mind, but who is the other group that
missed this meeting?
The way it looks, all who did not attend this meeting must have lost a good event.

Regards,

Ara Nahabedian
High Doon, England, UK
4/28/08

Very nice article.
A question bothers me. What would have happened if "Hai Gedron" invited such an important guest? Would we have had the same picture in the hall (Catholic, Evangelical, semi-apostolic…)? Most probably there would be a really full capacity to be proud of.
Is this really the organizers' fault? Should they change their advertising strategies, their organizing behaviors? Should they involve Gedron’s people to work together in such critical events. Will they?!!
How strong is the relation between the organizers (Diocese, AGBU, World Alliance)? Has each group done its best to advertise and organize members to attend such an important event? Or are they doing this to show the other half that they CAN do, …or have some photos with his excellency in their albums and a microphone for some jocularity…?
V A
4/22/08
Montreal also hosted Mr. Evans on Saturday April 19th. Again, the attendance was anemic and again we blame everyone- them, they, the others, semi, hemi… for not being present at a memorable event honoring Mr. Evans. There are emails going back and forth between individuals trying to ask why. There are many explanations.
My question is, where was a certain Bishop during the Montreal honoring of Mr. Evans? Or today at the Requiem Mass for Armenian Genocide Victims ! April 24 is a very important day for all Armenians. Our Bishop has decided to take a group of people to tour Jerusalem , some say fot pilgrimage (just to quote from their own web site and their publicity campaign)
I really wonder where this meets the pilgrimage concept: 'The cost of the Easter pilgrimage from Montreal or Toronto is just $3,399 per person. Price includes roundtrip airfare, first-class hotels in Jerusalem, daily breakfast and dinner, and guided sightseeing. Jerusalem, Bethlehem, Sea of Galilee, Nazareth, Capernaum, Upper Room, Megiddo, Qumran, Via Dolorosa, Garden of Gethsemane, Haifa, Mt. Carmel, Caesarea by the Sea…. '
Of all 52 weeks of the year, he has decided to be absent from his community on such an important date ! Now, instead of blaming people, let us look and examine the behavior of some of our leaders. I want to clarify that there are some who do deserve and should be respected ; however, as Dr. Minassian mentioned in his email and I quote him : ' his jocularity, in this solemn gathering ' is probably the answer why this certain Bishop takes April 24 so lightly….
Respectfully,
A concerned Armenian
4/22/08
Dr. Berge Minassian,
I met Ambassador Evans in Yerevan. I read what you wrote in Keghart several times to find the correct comment to make. I understood very well what you meant; I do not agree with you that we hate each other; no, we are just not united. I remember a few years ago when an Armenian centre would instruct its youth not to walk into Ottawa carrying the Armenian flag with its tri-colors on April 24; but now that is history, and we all honor the same flag. My point is that there is hope for us .
Regards,
Vrejouhy
4/22/08
Letter to the Right Honourable Serzh Sargsyan, Prime Minister of Republic of Armenia
Instead of sending these useless emails that REALLY have no impact because of our own people's apathy…WHY dont you or keghart (or who ever it is that you are representing) DO something (can be anything from fund raising/awareness/ like the jewish kibutz) that is more practical and hands on and actually dedicate your time and effort to really help Armenia and or Armenians in the diaspora. Maybe then I will care and help you myself… Otherwise stop sending me these emails that I don't even get a chance to read.

Thanks
Linda Kassabian
4/3/08

Keep up the good work.  Let the Canadian Armenians raise their voices louder.  Apostle Paul said that if the citizens are not awake and do not protest to the abuses of their rulers, their rulers will take advantage and will trample upon their god given rights.  
I was in Yerevan last October and the cab driver showed us a huge compound and asked if we knew anything about it.  He retorted that this building is a den for "…. tsakeri".  This was the parliament building….   That's what the common people think about their representatives.   They have to do more than just certain characterizations.    
Yeghishe
4/4/08
I did not write this http://www.petitiononline.com/yerevan/petition.html but I did sign it. Still I am thinking that all the actions of LTP are governed by Outside Powers that want unstable Armenia. There were many opportunities for Levon to protest against governing system; I don't say what he states are wrong. BUT  WHY NOW? He had 10 full years to do that. Who gets to profit from all these actions making an unstable country? So organized! For sure NOT THE PEOPLE
Vigen Mouradian  
4/11/08
Why? Why? Why?
Caroline Cox thinks we are bound to bring upon ourselves the implosion of our community and our ancestral land if we do not wake up and start putting our priorities in order.  Viken Attarian used a key word in his assessment of the current situation in Armenia.  "Evolutionary" was the word that caught my attention.  During our four thousand years of existence we have experienced many many upheavals  You name them, we have had them. If we need revolutions let's have them.  If we have to have governments subservient to major powers, let's have them.  If corrupt officials are to rule our land, let's have them.   In one word, our expectation that we could have a Jeffersonian democracy overnight is a far fetched dream.  Thus, evolution will sweep  away every wave of unrest and turbulence.  But Armenia and Armenians will not be just some ethnic existence through the annals of human history.  
Yeghishe
4/1/08
Armenians in Armenia lived socialism (in whatever form you may understand). Armenia was considered prosperous in the soviet union standards. People worked less hours a day and were paid satisfactory sums to maintain a decent life. The socialist system had a lot of limitations. Most of the people dreamed to have a capitalistic system; (they thought) economic freedom will help to enrich them, to create prosperity.
Capitalism for them was synonymous to western style of life and western abundance. No one, even the smart ones didn't imagine that capitalism could be like Pakistan or Cambodia, or any other country from the 3rd world. The same people uprooted "socialism" and sold factories as metal to Iran. Destroyed the economy and cultural, scientific institutions, almost everything, and opened the doors for capitalism. What is capitalism? Doesn't capitalist system give the right to a few to own the wealth of the country, and the rest have nothing but their labor?
In my opinion the turmoil in Armenia is the result of the disappointed masses, the dreams that did't come true.What we have is truly capitalism: newly formed rich people with the majority in poverty. The same is happening in all ex-Soviet Union republics, even in Russia. The whole damn mistake started with the first President. No goverment in the world can save the poor if the rich will not invest their money to esablish jobs for the poor, etc
Noobar 4/1/08
These why? why? why? concerns have bothered most of us for many years. You had the forsight to
crystalize them vividly. The real puzzle however is HOW? HOW and HOW? and by WHO? WHO? and WHO? Short
of an action plan with tangible measures we will continue to spin our wheels.
Please send me your e-mail address.

Hovsep Torossian, Detroit

An Open Letter to the Armenian Americans
Vahe Oshagan's comments: http://groong.usc.edu/ADconf/199909/speeches/oshagan.html
"The Armenian is he who suffers for not being an ideal Armenian…" Vahe Oshagan.
People in every nation's Diaspora expect of their homeland unrealistic achievements that cannot be fulfilled. Every nation's Diasporans freeze the time in their mind after they leave their homeland and hold on to the dream of the past; that creates wider chasm between the dreamers and reality on the ground. This is apparent with the layers of Diasporas that we have witnessed in every generation.
New immigrants regard the old comers as betrayers of the past, and the old immigrants regard the new comers
unrealistic of the new times in the new land.
Armenians are people like any other human beings. They have their daily needs, they struggle to put grocery at their table, want their children to have education, have families and all the other needs. Like any other nation, struggling in life brings with it the good and the bad, depending which side you look at. Reality on the ground is different.
If every society has its own fabric of behaviors, Armenians have too. They have clergy, we have too. They have politicians, we have too. They have businessmen, we have too. They have prostitutes, we have too. They have mafia, we have too… That is the reality. It is unnecessary to feel embarrassed to be an Armenian if our perceived standards do not meet with what exists in the real world.
Hence, I love Armenia, good or bad, unconditional, without fear. I love the way it was, the way it is and the way it will be. I have always loved Vartan as well as Vasag Suini and I think Vasag Suini was not a betrayer of the country, he was a practical man. There were many mistakes by our clergy during the turn of the last century, but believe it or not, the biggest mistake was done in my opinion, by Khrimian Hayrig. With all due respect, he was not a politician. And I love him, even though he may have ignited an unnecessary revolt.
In my opinion, Armenians outside Armenia should stop imposing their dream on Armenia. If I really care, I should abandon everything and go and live there, in Armenia, in Artsakh, on the land. Sending our crumbs and a few cents, does not make us patriots. I have relatives who did that in 1948 and recently to Artsakh.
Hagop Toroyan
3/30/08
Armenia at the Crossroads
Is it in our genetic make up to produce leaders of the stature of Gandhi who will set the tone of sacrifice and humility for the whole nation? If such a leader ever by chance came to exist will it be respected or laughed at as naive in the ways of this world? What values does the education system instill in the new generation as the clay that needs to be shaped as future leaders? Do we need to have a college specifically culturing such values in future leaders? If such students come from the elite families will they be able to understand that the use of power should not be in grabbing more power but in serving the least fortunate among them.
Vahe Balabanian 3/28/08
My Homeland is being pushed and pulled by the United States and Russia. Do not accuse the government for arresting those who see "Karabaghtsi" as its arch enemy. Shame on those who call themselves Armenian and have turned their back on Karabagh. The big powers learned how to divide and rule us. Shame on us that we haven't learned from our experiences of living in the Middle Eastern countries. Your Human Rights should be tossed in the garbage bin.
Rima Siraki 3/28/08
A Call for Justice, Respect for Human Rights and Democracy

Reflections on the Recent Tragedy in Yerevan
I fully agree!  There is nothing worse than calling for outside investigators and to advertise to the world our internal wrongs! Our country is still in its infancy and the last thing we need is outside interference.
Eugenie
3/12/08
Thank you very much. Now, there is more truth than falsehood. Let's think about the non-revolutionary ways to get out of this situation.
Gagik Hovhannisyan
3/12/08
I couldn't agree more with the last few paragraphs of your article.
Hratch Koumrouyan
Beirut/London
3/12/08
Yes, you are right, it is the worst thing to call for an international investigation.
Best regards,
Artur Ishkhanyan
3/11/08
Great posting, thank you for a breath of fresh air.
I am a development consultant, working in Armenia, Afghanistan and Pakistan, I have my own NGO in Armenia, working in rural development, implementing small projects with big impacts.
I tend to look at the entire development from a "sustainability" point of view and for what it's worth, here is my two cents.
Why do governments fail (Sachs, J. 2006)? due to lack of a transparent government and corruption.
Why do people end up in poverty trap (Sachs, J. 2006)? again, due to a non-transparent, corrupt government machinery at all levels.
Why do Diaspora and Western Donors fail (Easterly, W., 2006)? due to lack of a better understanding of "development", "sustainability" and "constant hand-outs".
Our Diaspora community members and organizations did absolutely NO favor to Armenians, but to promote a dysfunctional society by giving hand outs, we should have taught them "how to fish to feed self for life", not "to give them a fish every day".
Our Diaspora helped people to stand on their feet, but also contributed to "corruption", one would ask……how? well, we keep pouring money into funds without demanding for transparency, audit, accountability, so our money lands in wrong hands and/or spent on renovating a park for 2.0 million dollars across from Presidential Estate, now what exactly is the IMPACT? rather than the fact that our young kids gather at the park, munch on sunflower seeds, smoke and pollute the place, now, I work in rural areas, 2.0 million dollars will renovate at least 10 villages, if not more.
Yes, we built roads that fall apart during winter, why? There is no proper supervision. Yes, we built schools and placed computers and supplies that disappeared after few months, why? Because there is no sense of ownership by the community, again "it's a hand out". Yes, we built clinics, so that the physicians charge 10,000 AMD (under the table) to see poor patients. Yes, we sent tons of medicine that goes through Ministry of Health, then to be distributed to the same clinics and charge vulnerable patients.
I met a 70 year old woman in a village who complained about her feet and lack of blood circulation, when asked…..Metric why don't you go to local clinic? her response was. they charge 10,000 AMD for the visit and medicine……now, this is the same clinic built by GOOD DEED of Diaspora to help the poor.
I met a crying mother who lost her 5 year old boy to a "bee sting", a precious life lost to simple incident, she was not able to pay for medicine, again, another clinic built by Diaspora. Now, the question is…….do we have clinics and hospitals built by International NGOs that support the poor? absolutely, a clinic in Bejni, built by the World Vision, others built by OXFAM, all seem to be working well and serve the poor, why? because both are British organizations with a thorough strategic planning, every dollar counts. I personally contribute to both organizations (as little as $20.00) and receive paper statements on quarterly basis, I, as a donor have the right to audit their books at my expense.
Has anyone ever asked the question about "WHAT IS OUR STATUS?", we can't be placed as an under- developed country, while we are building multi-million dollar buildings and selling an apartment in Yerevan for $1700 per sq. meter, driving expensive cars and live a lavish life style……we can't be placed as transiting country….what have we got to show for since independence? economic development is not about three streets in YEREVAN, it's about the entire country, unemployment rate (more than 80 percent in rural areas), poverty rate (over 46 percent)…..we can't be placed as a POST CONFLICT, it's been over 16 years…so, on the one hand we are a developing country, on the other hand we fall into Millennium Challenge Account (MCA) with the poorest countries in the world….hmmmmm.
I have done my share to raise these issues with the Diaspora organizations, presented facts and figures about my findings, but all went astray due to cultural phenomena called "amot".
Our Diaspora sends money to Armenia out of romance and guilt, the idea is "I can't make a trip, so, I will send a thousand dollars" is WRONG. It's time to put "vision to action".
If our Diaspora is determined to make a difference and build a brighter, Democratic Armenia, they NEED TO STOP GIVING and start TEACHING. Teach people about "human rights", "rule of law", "democracy" and how to lead a transparent life, teach our youth "principles", "honesty", "integrity" to believe in their country and remain and serve the motherland.
We are going through another GENOCIDE, 1.0 million people migrated, we lose our intelligent youth to other countries, our girls are walking down the streets in Dubai to make a living, human trafficking is rising, the poor are trapped in "poverty trap", villages are left to rot, HIV/AIDS/MALARIA and other fatal diseases are spreading like the speed of light…..and human life has absolutely no value in Armenia.
All in all, Armenia is going through “aid curse” which defines as “high aid revenues going to the national government benefit political insiders, often corrupt insiders” (Easterly, W.)
May God bless Armenia and its people, and may none of us end up carrying a "white man's burden".
Hilda Grigorian
3/11/08
Looking Ahead Into the Future, Distancing From the Past is Unequivocally Obama's Path
We've seen many Obamas, we will see more. Depend on yourself only.
Zohrab Atarian
3/23/08
How patently Canadian of you to favor the American Senator considered to be the most inexperienced and the most liberal. We have one of yours as our governor and we’re all waiting for the next election to vote her and her liberal approach to governance out of office. What is even more annoying, short sighted, naïve, take your pick, is to suggest that we vote for either of the Democratic candidates because he/she favors the resolution to recognize the Armenian Genocide. Your socialist roots are showing. As an unhyphenated American of Armenian heritage (1st generation) I believe your political philosophy has, and continues to be shown as one that emasculates not liberates the soul of society. I sincerely take exception to your intrusion into our politics in an attempt to convince some unsuspecting or uninitiated soul that your argument, however well articulated, is credible.
Berge Paul Avesian Sr.
2/9/08
Cheers Abe
Agreed 100%!
Ruth
2/8/08
Hey guys out East and West in the USA………. All in the Family??? Are you talking about the Clinton term during the 1990's when President Billy Clinton Released his friend …..Obama after the Towers were bombed…. ? OOPS is that why he's not friendly with Husain? Or is that Osama? Oh wait…Obomba…Barak…Osama…Hee hee check it out….Hillary and Husain are going at it now…and Teddy Kennedy and Carolyn Kennedy and Oprah (who just got her new accent) and Kerry are all in love with Osama? Or was that Obama….Let's just call him Husain to cut the confusion…Hee, hee, somebody guessed it right; .he is Musl. Where is Monica in the picture? Is she voting for Billy's wife?
Anonymous
2/7/08
As Armenians we should not vote for the hippy crooks Clintons who stole the White House properties. Have you forgotten the clinto draft Dodger President, a coward like liar Bush who was against the recognition of the Armenian Genocide? Where was Hillary?
Don’t trust them. Give Obama a chance. If he does the same like his predecessors then this so called superpower is morally corrupt!
Robert C Paul
2/9/08

I have been reading about Obama's intentions to raise the isse of the Genocide Resolution once elected President. Although it is a noble cause, he is NOT the right person for America. There are many secrets about his past- much of his youth is associated with Islamic surroundings.

As Armenans, whether first or fourth generation, we always have a pull towards our Armenian roots, and even if not actively involved in Armenian affairs, most still support Armemian causes. This can be applied to Obama as well. He will always side with Islamic interests, including Tukrey, and this is not the type of leadership Armenans or America needs now.

When Bill Clinton was President, everyone knew it was a double team effort with him and Hillary. Our country was prosperous, we were at peace, we had a $9 billion surplus, and things were affordable. They were mostly a good 8 years.

So, in conclusion, I don't think supporting Obama just because he says supports our cause is enough for him to be President. America is in deep trouble- and we need someone who will lead us to prosperity once more- it is not Obama.

Please stop emailing for Armenians to support him.

Sincerely,
Elizabeth Davtian, California
2/6/ 08
I wouldn't hold my breath…on either of them. My paternal side voted for the past 100 years and died with the last ballot for a Democrat, believing the promises made to them since 1915 ish…..Ha…
Helen, USA
2/6/08
I hope for Obama too but sadly I don't have a vote!
Ruth, London UK
2/5/08
Although I live in Germany but like many of my armenian counterparts are closely following the election campaign in the US.

Our only hope is that the Armenian lobby will be strong enough to get some kind of written assurance that the promise made by either candidate will come true.

Sylvie Balian, Germany
2/5/08
Thank you for this incisive and passionate endorsement of Obama. I too have become tremendously excited with his campaign … I think… that we have a true progressive with a shot at the presidency on the scene and that the Armenian cause will only benefit from it.
Sevag, USA
2/4/08
I agree. A small chance but possible.
Bedros, California
2/4/08
Well written.
Hasmig
2/4/08
It’s only a game old chap! and there’s another approach by rule of thumb  –  for the diaspora armenian at large  –  “what irritates turkey cannot be bad”
Bedros
2/4/08

Your article is very true, I also believe that only a suffered person can understand what does it mean to live the trauma of suffering. Unfortunately I don't believe that the American people can make the right choice this time…. after all these are the same people who elected  that criminal twice…Let's hope that I am wrong… which I doubt..

Arsine, Canada
2/3/08
Isn't Obama A muslim?
Zizi, USA
2/3/08
Thank YOU!!!!
Janet Mouradian
2/3/08

Nicely written. i see you live in canada? are you a US citizen so you can vote?
Nellie, USA
2/3/08
Would you please not send people spam messages about things you have no understanding of? Caroline Kennedy
may be considered an authority in Istambul, but among sentient people in the US she is just another airhead on the level of Britney Spears. And that's the smallest bit of nonsense in your letter.

Patrick, USA
2/3/08
Thank you! …couldn't agree more. We are disturbed that (some people)…think that just because Clinton signed a statement saying she would recognize the Genocide, that she actually would. We all remember, as you note, Clinton's actions preventing the resolution from coming to the House floor during his terms. We, too, think Clinton has too much baggage – without sufficient transparency.
Samantha Power has waxed eloquently about him…Let's hope…I'll forward your email to friends.
Carolann, USA
2/3/08
 
Thank you for doing such a masterful job of explaining bit by bit the various attributes of both candidates and then voicing your opinion that Obama is by far the right choice to make. I hope your article has far reaching influence in the Armenian community nationwide so that your logic will help them make or reach the same conclusion.
Harry Parsekian, Watertown
2/3/08
 
I'm 100% sure that America is still not ready for either a black or a woman president. The Democrats simply destroyed themselves for the coming elections.

No matter who gets on the Republican's train – even an aBush more than the current aBush – the Republican candidate will win the presidency.

America is full of hypocricy. It is still racist and still discrimates more than any other country in the world. Those 60
million who voted for Bush the second time, and helped him win even with the Iraq mess, will vote for the republican candidate simply because the Republican candidate is a WHITE MAN, not black or woman.

What is more sad is that the Armenians are again falling in the trap of believing Obama or Clinton – or anyone for that matter – will recognize the Genocide, so "let's all vote for him/her" story and campaign. Bush Jr, Clinton, Bush Sr. all promised to recognize it, but once they became president they noticed their interests with Turkey is much larger than their interest with Armenia or the Armenian diaspora, who are only good during voting, not after voting.

Hope one day we will wake up and work on something more important than gathering votes for this or that candidate. We are more politically stupid than I could imagine.

Katia, Canada
2/3/2008
Well written.
Thomas Walkom of Toronot Star, 6 February 2008, in his article  Believe it or not, a Republican could win again has a different take on what's in the bag. It complements this section of comments and it's posted for those who are interested in a Canadian perspective.
He writes,

"Lost in the excitement over the race between Hillary Clinton and Barack Obama is a possibility that once seemed remote but that now does not. In the end, regardless of the hype surrounding their rivalry, neither might win the U.S. presidency. In the end, another Republican – probably John McCain – may well end up replacing George W. Bush.
At one level, this should be obvious. The U.S. primaries, including last night's Super Tuesday extravaganza, are designed to pick Republican and Democratic presidential nominees. The full-bore race for America's top job won't take off until late summer.

However, the sheer drama of the Clinton-Obama contest makes many of us forget that fact. Behind the fascination with the details of last night's primaries – such as how California's 370 Democratic delegates will eventually be apportioned – lies the assumption that one of these two will become president and thereby put paid to the disastrous Bush presidency.

Outsiders look at America and ask how voters could make any other reasonable choice. They see Republican Bush as having presided over a botched war and a stumbling economy. Many (including many Canadians) say America is now the gravest threat to world peace. What sane person could wish for more of that? And for a while it did seem that the Republicans had little hope in 2008. They were repudiated in the mid-term congressional elections. Their presidential contenders, or at least those considered likely to win nomination in a party still dominated by the religious right, seemed fatally flawed.

Conservatism itself seemed in retreat as the ideological factions within the Republican party began sniping at one another.

But then three things happened. First, Bush's so-called troop surge in Iraq has worked, if not permanently, at least enough to remove the war from the front burner of domestic politics.
Second, Republican voters in the early primary contests delivered a rebuke to the purists of their own party by voting in significant numbers for the candidate best positioned to attract Democrats and independents – McCain. He is not yet a shoo-in. But he continued to slowly and steadily amass delegates last night with wins from New York to Oklahoma. (Democrats are beginning, belatedly, to realize that McCain will be the one to beat. Hence the recent spate of blogging attacks on him for his temper, his policy flip-flops and the fact that his grandfather took part in America's late-19th century subjugation of the Philippines.)

Third, the sheer amount of attention paid to Clinton and Obama, as well as their sniping at one another, has reminded Americans why so many mistrust the Democrats. Clinton, in spite of years of edge softening, still comes across as the great schemer. As for Obama, there is a children's crusade element to his campaign that is reminiscent less of John Kennedy than of George McGovern, the Democratic senator who lost to Richard Nixon in 1972.

And finally there are the questions most are too polite to ask. When it comes to race, sex and religion, Americans are a remarkably conservative people. In Canada, Roman Catholics have routinely served as prime ministers since the 19th century. But Americans did not elect their first Roman Catholic president until 1960.

Come November, will U.S. voters be willing to elect either a woman or a black man? The Republican party, by bringing to the fore a candidate that can be presented as reasonable, is giving them an excuse to do neither."

Thomas Walkom, Toronto Star Contributor, 6 February, 2008"
Why Don't Armenians Support the Idea of Setting up an International Commission?
The article that stuck out was "Why don't Armenians support the idea of setting up an international commission" as it seemed to be from a non-Armenian and an academic.
 
I enjoyed reading the back and forth correspondences between the two of you. Somewhere along the way I thought that this guy is a Turk. Fine. No problem. But when I read a couple of sentences in the second last paragraph of his second email I was put off. The way he reconciles the deaths committed by Armenians and those by Turks is sheer perversion of a grand scale. Quite a misrepresentation  for someone who speaks of  "talking about scientific knowledge".

Admittedly he somewhat redeems himself in the last paragraph with its colorfulness.
 
Che–
2/11/08
Why is Tuna Baskoy advocating the setting up of a new international commission to look into the historical facts of 1915? This work has already been carried out by the pre-eminent group of independent scholar, the International Association of Genocide Scholars, who have affirmed the Armenian Genocide in two formal statements resolved in conference, and in a letter directly to the Turkish Prime Minister. There is also independent corroboration in the ICTJ Memorandum and with the Permanent People's Tribunal in Paris. I would like him, and others of the same persuasion, to study these and then tell us why these should be set aside and the whole issue looked at afresh. Neither the Armenians nor Turks were directly involved with these analyses and conclusions. So what is the value of a David & Goliath confrontation between these two peoples? I believe that some people have a lot of catching up to do!

Armenag Topalian
2/9/08
Dr Tuna Baskoy while taking the high ground forgets the value of redemption in avoiding future repetitions. He juxtaposes a State crime with the willingness of the suppressed to liberate themselves from the yoke of State injustices. If Armenians were rebelling and were "relocated" which was not the case, how can he account for 750,000 Assyrians that perished in the 1915 Genocide which Assyrians call Seypa. Were Assyrians confused for Armenians or were they only in the way of a sinister plot for Pan-Turkism? Let him be humble and come down from his pedestal of righteousness. Only then we shall be able to embrace each other. A prosperous future is not a currency to cover past misdeeds because it is a fantasy which will not happen.
Vahe Balabanian
2/9/08
Isn't the International Association of Genocide Scholars much more than a commission for Prof. Baskoy ? The dispute is not between "Armenian" and "Turkish" historians, it is between the denialist Turkish official position and the rest of the scholarly world. The IASGS ( http://genocidescholars.org/ ) has recognized the fact of the Genocide against the Armenians. As for leaving the past behind, that's possible only after we (Armenians and Turks, Armenia and Turkey) agree about that common past. So long as there's denial, the past won't let go of us. Furthermore, Genocide is not a minor incident to just "accept" it and move on; Armenia and Armenians continue to suffer because of the Genocide. There should be a remedy for it.
Giro Manoyan, Yerevan, Armenia
2/9/08
"Hopes in … dreams last much longer than fear instilled through murders."
…first thing which should be done – the President of Armenia should speak in UN about Genocide. We cannot wait 200 years that all countries in the world recognize the massacres of the Armenians in the Ottoman Empire. This is a road to nowhere.
Viktor, Armenia
1/15/2008
In order to prevent genocide, we need to learn about it
I enjoyed the articles, especially, the one regarding Grade 11 curriculm, and the synopsis of the other articles.
Shavarsh, Toronto

Armenians Demand Justice, Not Recognition
finally someone makes sense…  i am armenian…and i do not want an apology…  i want lands back… and i want reparation back  to rebuild what was destroyed…  apology will not bring back my great grand parents….  Turkey for its salvation has no other choice but to build a strong neighbor in Armenia… for it to survive   and not be doomed to oblivion…  turkey thinks it is strong but in 10-50 years it could be totally destroyed from within if it keeps   its present course…  no one country can bully others and expect to survive…someone is going to say enough is enough….
Vrej Keoshkerian, Toronto
6/12/07
Fully agree with Sassounian on this issue.
Haig Baltadjian, Montreal
11/12/07
Dear Turkish Canadians,
As you are all out of your home country, you may hear strange things… Stories about "Armenian Genocide" or similar stories about those old Christians who were living in your hometown. I welcome you to "real free world"…have you ever thought why these Armenians are scattered all over the world? Yes we are the survivors of the Armenian Genocide committed by the Young Ottoman Turks, and we all are looking for justice…
My ancestors were living peacefully for more than 3000 years in Turkey, then, Armenia. A population of 1.5 million vanished from the face of the earth between 1915-1923. The world at the time made a big noise..but nothing else. Later Hitler would say "after all who remembers the Armenians."
That is why Hitler felt free to order the SS army to kill Poles and Jews in Europe. The Europeans ignored, until in 1945 they saw what had happened.
What you hear from Armenians is the truth…something that you have never heard while you were living in Turkey…
I would like to sit beside my Turkish friends and tell them, "I do not hate you." It is your generals and their friends that do not want you to know the past, That is why the penal code and article 301 was brought in. They want you to believe that  Armenians hate you.
Germans did get over it long time ago…You too after knowing what happened will be able to.
I recommend to every Turk living in Canada to read about "The George Town Boys" or watch documentary videos about them to learn how and why they came to Canada.
Sincerely,
Grish Begian, Toronto
you can reach me at [email protected]
10/1/08

Here is a solution. . .but what was the problem?
Hi: I understand your frustrations and anger with the Diaspora and Armenia. However, try to realize that Armenian psyche was shaped by historical and geographical influences, political harassment by host countries, etc. etc.etc.
I am not rationalizing the Armenian psyche, the mistakes, etc. etc. etc.
There are solutions, and the solutions are what are qually provided to all peoples, nations, who have similarly suffered genocide, theft of homeland, annihialation of a nation… that is the end result of the Armenian psyche….
Armenians are entitled to the damages in money, land, compensation and return of everything taken from them to make them whole, although nothing will make them whole….
Now, if you want to discuss how we can overcome difficulties, that is different! We have to take what we are left with, understand why it is what it is, and come up with positive building blocks.
Try not to blame Armenians and have such harsh feelings for what it is now! You will feel better, and you can see positive solutions to overcome difficulties. If you do not want to participate in the nation building, then watch it struggle to it's aims.
At the end of the day, I say, Armenians will be the last ones to close the chapter on mankind, engage in destroying the world ecologically, politically, economically. Armenians were indeed the inhabitants of and creator of cradle of civilization, and they will be the last ones to die out.
Salute!

Angela Barseghian
10/1/08
The Fundamentals of Armenian identity or who is an Armenian
Fully agree with Dr. Armen Ayvazians view point; I suggest the immidiate course of action without cost to anyone as follows:
1- Let Etchmiatsin the mother church pass a law and let all our vartabet(s) get married and form a families in Armenia;
2- Let the Armenian government pass a law to withhold money in trust from those Armenian families who want to emigrate to other countries and if they do not return after 3 years transfer the amount to the next of kin living in Armenia;
3- Reactivate NERGAGHT commitee as soon as possible;
4- Give a plot of land to Azatamartiks and new returneees;
5- Let the Armenian government enact a law to allow any spurkahay like Raffi Hovanessian run for office.
Enough is enough! Let us build plants where people can work; treat all proffessors same as military leaders..
Tom Siraki, Toronto
6/12/07

This is indeed very interesting. However, there are a few points I would like to emphasize here regarding Dr. Armen Ayvazyan's input.
1) Armenians are a bit similar to the Jews. Their power remains in their DIASPORA, more than anywhere else.
2) The great asset Armenians have is their integration with the country/nation they are living in. Integration does not always mean forgetting your origins, your language, your history.
3) I have always aspired towards the Human side of a Nation and its Universal nature; I am against the "ghettoesque" (a la maniere juive) type of societies Armenians (like any others) tend to be subjected to. A lot of Armenians are married to non-Armenians; that does not make them at all less Armenian, on the contrary.
4) To be Armenian, it is a feeling you would have to be proud of, to remember, to dream, to be sensible to Armenian music, literature, history, religion, sports, movies, VIPs, etc.
George, Florida
7/12/07
Genocide acknowledgment: A Dead End?
As a Turk I acknowledge the Armenian genocide and recognise that the Turkish government must make a clear acknowledgement of this historical fact. There are also two significant points to remember with regard to Turkey. First, Turkey is a nation of over 70 million whose strategic profile is rising in terms of being an energy corridor as well as in other areas of economic development. Armenia is only a nation of 3.5 million and the Diaspora can only do so much as the recent situation with the American Congress has proven. Second, time is on the side of Turkey. To win all it has to do is, well, nothing. However, the best Armenians can hope for is some level of monetary reparations. Anything beyond this is hyper-illusionary. Clinging to unrealistic hopes will only defer any positive action by Turkey.
Celal
24/12/08
Mirror, Mirror on the Wall, Who is the Most Powerful of All
In line with Avedis Kevorkian's story, Armenians are the most powerful. America is afraid of Turkey, and the Turks are afraid of the Armenians, so who is the most powerful. The power is on the side of truth, they know it and they are afraid of it. They know how ugly it is.
Noobar, NJ
10/12/07

No Mr. Wiesel, You don't speak on my behalf
Thank you for saying a big NO to Mr. Wiesel. Why these people become so nervous every time when the recognition of the Armenian Genocide comes so close? What worries them to make weird comments and try to find "excuses" not to name the "tragic events" of 1915-1923 as Genocide? It seems to me that they want to show to the world that genocide-holocaust happened only to their people, they are the only nation who suffered, they are the ones who lost millions in WWII. Did they lose LAND, a motherland?
Minas Kojayan
25/11/07
Thank you for your eloquent reply to Elie Wiesel's racist remarks. Athough he is known as a humanitarian and a human rights activist, unfortunately, he has tunnel vision. He doesn't want to address the Genocide of Armenians, and he has no desire to look at Israel's current and former ethnic cleansing of Palestinians.
I lost respect for him once I educated myself on the Israel/Palestine issue, and realized that like many other Jewish people, he believes only in the suffering of the Jews;  the injustices done to all other peoples can and should be ignored, particularly those perpetrated by Israel.
I say this as an American who is ethnically Jewish; I grew up with this ethos, and I strongly reject it. Again, thank you so much for sharing your anger at his appalling words.
Ruth Elkin
30/11/07

I Need Your Help Doc!

After much experience similar to your complaints, I have come to the conclusion that we depend too much and unnecessarily on who many of us call "our leadership" or "our Armenian friends". I don't know why many come to the conclusion that these people are more intelligent than us!
Why do we need them to teach our children to be proud of being an Armenian? What is your role as a parent?
Why do we need them to tell us who is a good friend or a good spouse? What's wrong with your own brain, logic, judgement and opinion?
Why do we need some so-called friends to tell us this school or that school is good or bad? What's wrong with the education you got? Are you not able to go to a school and ask around and see for yourself which is good or better than another? Are you so illiterate and uneducated that you cannot decide which school is better or worse?
Why do we let other people meddle in our own lives? Why do we believe blindly that WISDOM is pouring out of their ears and mouth, while we don't have an ounce of common sense? and then we blame them for all the woes we have.
It's about time we blame ourselves.
You smoke, you get lung-cancer, you blame the cigarette companies.
You eat a lot, you get obese, you get a stroke, you blame the junk food companies.
And you let others meddle in your personal life, your children's upbringing, your relationship with your wife (or husband), and then you blame them…
Dr. Katia 😉
21/11/2007
I presume you are looking for a common cause underlying the three examples you mention. The medical analogy will probably be a "syndrome": a group of symptoms and signs that will characterize a single pathologic state. I have a hard time to find one causal factor in all three.
In the first example of removing the children from an Armenian school of Apostoloc faith and sending them to a Catholioc school (?Armenian Catholic) could possibly be due to teachings in the first school that are not acceptable to the parents.
Your third example of divorce in a couple of opposing backgrounds of national "ideologies" could also possibly arise from lack of tolerance, sensitivity and respect to differing opinions about national issues. I know of several couples of opposing national views, who have no such complications in their families as the example you give.
As to your second example of our young aduld children who remain indifferent to our national concerns (and this is a very generalized phenomenon),  the closest I can get to the causal factors of the above two examples will be the youth's dismissal of our national issues as old-fashioned and senseless arguments. I am confident that they (at least a good number of them) will find their own way of contributing to the survival of the Armenian identity, specially since the independence of Armenia, the international sensitivity of the Armenian Genocide and the presence of world-famous Armenians.
Therefore, if there is an underlying pathological cause in your three examples, it would be rigid stereoptypes in behavior in some sectors, and hopefully this is changing to the better.
Haroutiun
23/11/2007
Most of what the young do is a reflection and imitation of their parents. Look no further. The fault is with us and the solution is also with us. I am sure for every such case you can find many more of counter cases. But the ones that hurt are the ones we dwell on.
Vahe
30/11/07
Open Letter of Protest

Turkey will not find peace until it comes to terms with its past and acknowledge its citizens' right to express what they think.
I support Dikran Abrahamian's effort for greater democracy in Turkey.
Ayse Gunaysu
I endorse fully the contents of the open letter of protest
Diran Avedian, Montreal
Everybody has to condemn the last action of Turkey to try the two journalists of Armenian origin as a violation of freedom of speech. (Translated from Spanish)
Spain

The reason I am writing …..is to express my admiration to Fatma and Elif and every body else in the circle of Turkish intellectuals waging a war for establishing democratic values in Turkish minds and souls. The going is tough; it is an uphill battle, rowing against the tide of misinformed masses of the Turkish society. It is a dangerous undertaking for them. People are jailed and assassinated for fighting ignorance. Galileo insisted on his truth. He was jailed. Jesus had to be tortured, put on the cross and only then he ascended to heaven to live in glory.
Yeghishe

What's Next?

For me… the most important item would be the Morning After… That is, when Ankara accepts the Armenian Genocide. Recent developments around the globe, in particular in the US, when ADL (recognized) the Armenian genocide, many Turkish voices have joined in, showing that the Turkish inner defense is experiencing structural cracks…It is evident that the TIME clock is at its count-down mode for Armenians, who have been waiting for so long. There will be one morning when Armenians will wake up to the news that Ankara has recognized the Armenian Genocide..

I question, what mechanisms do Armenians have in place to be able to rise to the moment? As a consequence, who will be the Supreme Authority to negotiate? Is it the President of Armenia, the Catholicos of all Armenians, the Catholicos of Cilicia, and the prominent political parties in the Diaspora? Who?

I am not surprised, none of the above has raised this question because they individually perceive that they simply disqualify. I am afraid, the Armenian Cause that thus far had been like a belt holding us in-one, will snap the Morning After. I am even afraid to question, how good will it be when the TIME comes we, as a nation and people, are unprepared for it.
Harout

Your cause albeit interesting, lacks many fundamental reasons to compel a community to lobby for an embassy in Armenia.
Vatche Manoug

A billion (s) dollar Canadian investments in Armenia will create a better Armenia than just a poetic representation.
Tom

Thank you for bringing up this issue. I often wondered what will it take for us to have Canadian Embassy in Yerevan and I often wondered why we have not pushed for it for so long. Today I will also write the Prime Minister of Canada and the leader of the opposition party, thanking them again for recognizing the Genocide and urging them to consider opening of an Embassy in Yerevan, and I would remind and urge every Armenian in Canada to do the same.

Right Hon Steven Harper,

First of all, as a Canadian Armenian, let me thank you for recognizing the Genocide against the Armenians by Turkey. I was so proud last April 24 in Yerevan the capital of Armenia to see the marchers holding high the Canadian flag along with the flags of the other brave countries that recognized that Genocide had taken place against the Armenians.

The next thing that Canadian Armenians will be proud of is seeing a Canadian Embassy in Yerevan. There is a need and we will be proud to visit our embassy when traveling in Armenia.

Keep up the good work.

Vrejouhy
Calgary, Alberta

To all Federal Politicians in Ottawa,

We are all very thankful for the votes in Parliament recognizing the Armenian Genocide. The next logical step would be to open a Canadian Embassy in Yerevan, Armenia. The Armenian Government has an Embassy in Ottawa. This makes good sense for two Democratic countries who have proven to be good friends and allies.

Sincerely,

Carl Georgian
Brantford, Ontario

As far as I am concerned, the future of our race is directly dependent on the survival and prosperity of Armenia/Karabagh. Without Armenia/Karabagh, the Armenian community in Canada will be an irrelevant entity; therefore we should all focus and work on strengthening Armenia/Karabagh, lock stock and barrel.

Migirdich

I endorse the idea of making our voices heard on the issue of opening up a Canadian embassy in Armenia. I'll try to raise this issue with other Armenians I know to see if we can initiate a campaign over this topic.

Davit Zargarian

Anything positive concerning Armenia is welcome. I guess we had to thank Mr. Dion for his approval to open a Canadian Embassy in Armenia, but after 6 months it’s a little late.
Souren Dermelkonian

It would be nice to publish a sample of a letter stating the statistics in favour for opening a Canadian embassy in Armenia.
V.

I believe we should persuade federal officials to establish a Canadian embassy in Armenia, and build on the recent praise-worthy actions made by them in recognizing the Genocide. Stronger relationship with Armenia, underscores Canada's commitment to cooperation and progress with countries wronged by injustice.
Vartan
 
I endorse the idea of making our voices heard on the issue of opening up a Canadian embassy in Armenia. I'll try to raise this issue with other Armenians to see if we can initiate a campaign over this topic.
Davit Zargarian
 
Anything positive concerning Armenia is welcome; I guess we had to thank Mr. Dion for his approval to open a Canadian Embassy in Armenia, but after 6 months it’s a little late to thank now.
Souren Der Melkonian
I believe we should persuade federal officials to establish a Canadian embassy in Armenia, and build on the recent praise-worthy actions taken by them in recognizing the Genocide as a historical fact. Openness to a stronger relationship with Armenia underscores Canada's commitment to cooperation and progress with countries wronged by injustice.
Anonymous
Your cause, albeit interesting, lacks many fundamental reasons to compel a community to lobby for an embassy in Armenia.
Vatche Manoug
A billion dollar Canadian investment in Armenia will create a better Armenia than just a poetic representation. For example, Canada can invest in the energy sector, for design and manufacturing of renewable energy, parts and components.  Canada’s need can be fulfilled by Armenia's human resources.
Tom
 
I often wondered what will it take for us to have Canadian Embassy in Yerevan, and I often wondered why we have not pushed for it for so long. Today I will also write the Prime Minister of Canada and the leader of the opposition party, thanking them again for recognizing the Genocide and urging them to consider opening of an Embassy in Yerevan, .and I would remind and urge every Armenian in Canada to do the same.
Vrejouhy
It would be nice to publish a sample of a letter stating the statistics in favour of opening a Canadian embassy in Armenia. Vahe
As far as I am concerned, the future of our race is directly dependent on the survival and prosperity of Armenia/Karabagh. Without Armenia/Karabagh, the Armenian community in Canada will be an irrelevant entity; therefore we should all focus and work on strengthening Armenia/Karabagh, lock stock and barrel.
Migirdic
 It has been a long time coming, but we are all very thankful for the votes in Parliament recognizing the Armenian Genocide; the next logical step would be to open a Canadian Embassy in Yerevan. The Armenian Government has an Embassy in Ottawa This makes good sense for two Democratic countries that have proven to be good friends and allies.  
Carl Georgian
A Faux Pas
I am against faith based school funding; they should stop funding the catholic schools.
Ani

I couldn't have said it better! Thanks for your courage,
Zareh

I'm unequivocally opposed to the idea of publicly funded religious schools … It is odd that the Cons are pushing this agenda since it is a far more "liberal" idea. 

Arby
I personally support public schools and am against spending public money on religious schools… As far as the Armenian community goes, I see the benefit of receiving public funds by Armenian schools.This is not the first time that such a dichotomy occurs.
Vahe
Please check today's Globe and Mail's survey on this subject, as of 00:50 am, it is 83% against the funding of faith based school. As for our leadership "consulting" each other before such positions are taken…it will not happen in my life-time.
Migirdic  
Thank you for sharing your thoughts ….Unfortunately, no one seems to be listening nor doing anything about it.
Pierre
 
Armenian parents send their children to Armenian schools for various reasons, but faith has not been the main driving factor. There are parents of different denominational backgrounds, even Jehovah’s witnesses. Along with the academic standard and often as important, they feel their children are SAFE in the nurturing atmosphere that both Armenian day schools offer in Toronto, as well as the heritage that comes from both the Armenian curriculum and the internal culture that the schools have developed over the years.

However, you can find parents who do not feel that much emphasis has to be laid on some Armenian subjects. This attitude is not unique in Canada. The effects are dire even in Lebanon, where deemphasizing Armenian subjects started much earlier.

Another point I'd like to make is: In the Catholic school system only the subject of religion (catechism) that is taught is a differentiating factor from public schools. Is it only religion that will be taught in the 'faith-based' schools? Armenian schools don't teach only Armenian religion, Jewish schools don't teach only Judaism and the list may go on. Who is to set the limits or control the curriculum? If only religion will be taught and be controlled closely (which I doubt), other questions/concerns will arise related to the teaching of language, culture and heritage as the raison d'être of most of these schools.

Educators were not consulted in this matter. Well, the leaders have known and know better!! That has been the case in our history too. Is it only an Armenian trait for centres or groups of different ideologies to limit their cooperation to the barest minimum, which might sometimes be interpreted as ‘underestimation’ of the other–if I may use the word? Unfortunately, leaders in the community do not have the flexibility to cooperate and consult one another when issues of common interest arise. I do not make this statement regarding the matter of faith based schools only, but other vital community matters as well. We cannot afford running our community with this mentality, especially in this age and more importantly in Canada.

With the news of a recent rapprochement between two prominent Armenian political parties in Armenia, followed by the publication of a joint communiqué, I would like to be optimistic that positive changes will incur not only in Armenia, but especially in the Armenian communities abroad, where, before very long, the question of identity will become a major issue.

Hasmig Kurdian (Educator)

An Open Letter to Patriarch Mutafyan
Rachel Goshgarian presents a very sober look at the situation of the Archbishop Mesrob Mutafyan as a hostage to the rulers of Turkey. Archbishop Mutafyan had threats to his life on the aftermath of the assassination of Hrant Dink and I remember he had a private visit by Erdogan at his patriarchate. Archbishop Mesrob Mutafyan has made no secret of his support for Erdogan in the last election. I wonder what the two spoke about.
Vahe Balabanian

I was impressed with this open letter written to Arch. Mesrob Mutafyan. He thinks he is playing politics, but He is totally wrong. I do not expect from Him to be "heghapokhakan", but He is crossing the limits of playing politics. What is He afraid of. This why there was a sort of controversy or coolness between the late Dink and His Beatitude.
Minas

Thank you for forwarding this link. It is a wonderful letter.
Ruth Elkin

In my opinion (our) Diaspora has never been a monolithic entity as suggested…and I do not see this being mentioned anywhere in the version of the interview that I have seen. The academic objectivity and the mixed emotions that have been expressed kindly and directly indicate how diverse our Diaspora is. From a global perspective, the historic progress of our Diaspora in the context of social, economic, political and cultural development has been very complex.

I think the real question about what is being planned should also be asked to the "Masters" that the Patriarch seems to be dealing with…Have the "masters" completed compiling the list of the "accepted individuals from our Diaspora" who will start discussions?….about the "recognition of the Genocide" ?…and is all this energy and activity only about recognition? Are the "masters" close in terms of concluding the names of "their selected Diaspora individuals"…to start these discussions …? Who represents the Diaspora? is the question that we must address and deal with ? Are we ready to accept "selected individuals" by a certain administration?
Hratch Minassian

I feel indebted to the author for this letter. (She) speaks on behalf of all of us. I wish we could ask the Patriarch why he behaves this way, what are the hidden reasons! (Translated from Armenian)
Zareh (Armenia)

I very much enjoyed reading Rachel Goshgarian's letter to patriarch Mutafyan.

Thomas Chanian, San Jose, California
 
I'm speechless. All I can say is 'hats off to Rachel', as she speaks on behalf of all of us. I wish you could pass this on to her.
Hasmig
Banner & Song of Himnatram

That was cool. I am an Armenian kid. I live in Texas I’ll post more soon: Garmeer, Gabooyd, and Dziranakooyn.
Anonymous
Shall we Wake up or Continue Sleeping

My sentiments exactly!!
Carl

I just read Mr. Attarian's comments about faith based schools and the Armenian position. I regret to say that he has a very wrong concept of Canadian multiculturalism and its primary objectives. Unfortunately he is not alone and may have been swayed by media reports. The Canadian multiculturalism act which was promulgated in 1988, and which is also the first of its kind in the world, outlines clearly the basic principles of what we want in Canada as a fundamental characteristic: that is, the equal treatment of all its citizens whether in the public or private sector. In short (that’s how) Trudeau also envisaged the development of a just society. It requires all government departments to report all their activities that guide their operations towards this ideal.
I must end humbly that as a member of the Canadian Multiculturalism Council, I was involved in the preparatory work for this Act.
Artie Hagopian

Will justice be denied again?
This is a letter I just emailed to Lynn Woolsey, my representative.
I encourage you guys to do the same. 🙂

Dear Lynn,

I was pleased to hear that the foreign affairs committee passed a resolution to recognize the Armenian Genocide. If I am correct, this will now go to the House of Representatives for another vote. As you know, our government's recognition of the Armenian Genocide infuriates the Turkish government. People in the Executive branch are suggesting that Turkey could even end up cutting off the supply lines to Iraq over this. Well, I think that now the House finally has a chance to truly represent the will of the voters and end the war in Iraq by passing the resolution recognizing the Genocide. Make Turkey so mad that they withdraw their "support" of the war and BAM – it's over. We depend on them so heavily to maintain this war that I believe we would be forced to begin withdrawals. Let's do it. Please. I hope you vote to approve the resolution. As an American of Armenian heritage, I can tell you that it really means a lot to at least have OUR government finally recognize the atrocities as what they were – a genocide on my ancestors. Most people of Armenian heritage pretty much know that Turkey will never admit to this, but we are all very grateful that others do. Doing it at a time like this in the face of their threats makes it mean that much more. Thanks in advance for your vote. By passing the resolution the House can do two good deeds at once.
Chris Svenson

Will justice be denied again?" as title leaves the reader in doubt!
However, the opinions expressed in the following text leave every reader in a state of clear understanding and belief that the Armenian Genocide Resolution should and will be recognized by Congress!
Artin Avedissian

Excellent Article.
Gabe Korajian

It is about time for the so called super power to acknowledge the Armenian Genocide. But they are so afraid to loose their loyal ally that did not let our troops on their soil. How hypocritical can you get?? This poor country of murderers is paying $300,000.00 a month to the lobbyists, $105,000.00 to the Livingstone(ex-congressman)group, $114,000.00 to Fleishman Hillard, to name a few. The money is American aid to turkey. May be if the US will give them some more aid they can pay all the corrupt congress. This money is our taxpayers’ money. To mention some more of these corrupt American greed, Steven Solarz, Hastert, Snowcroft and don't forget Gephard; he flip flopped, and was paid by Turkey. Money buys anything in the US. If you have money you can get away with murder. Almost everyday you will read of some corrupt or fraudulent deals by our high paid officials. US greed is on the rise.
Paul

Yes to recognizing the Genocide!
My Ancestors were from Van and Kars. My grandma told us everything.
Elmira

The Recent Convictions of Serkis Seropyan and Arat Dink

It is clear from her account that Fatma (Gocek) is frustrated. Clearly the letter writing campaign has not worked out as expected. Any campaign conducted outside Turkey will be looked at as interference and subject to threats by Turkey. How can we beat blind nationalism? It is through educating the Turkish public starting from the segment which clearly wants to be educated and not easily carried out by nationalism. Let us seek and organize this segment from within Turkey.
Vahe

My father was a survivor of the 1894-98 Genocide in Constantinople;
He was 4 years old. My grand father held him tight on his chest, ran to the Armenian Church, and barely escaped the Turks on his heels. The Armenian self defenders opened fire from the building and dispersed the cowards. This was Constantinople; how more violent was the situation in Anatolia? There, people were torched in the church.

One interesting item came to my mind. We in unison call the Kurdish rebels that approximately (represent) 1/4 of Turkey's population as terrorists. Now, our (American) rebels desiring independence from the British crown, were they also terrorists or people rebelling against injustice? If there is reaction by the Kurds, is it not against the actions of fellow Moslem by the Turks? This is now; how much more violent was the treatment of the Christians? Over centuries how did our people suffer (in the hands) of … Turkish invaders of our historical lands?
Berdj

Turkey is a country of beauty and the beast; while the land itself is so rich with cultural and geographical beauty, it is unfortunately filled with …(untold crimes)! Think about it, if there were no Armenian Genocide issue at hand, it would be something else, like the Kurds or other tribal group problem or their own terrorism that the citizens have to deal with.

I salute people like Serkis and Arat and his father "Hrant Dink" for their bravery …I salute them whole heartedly for what they stand for. And as a US Citizen, I can not stomach the corrupt politics of our country and how in denial we are about doing the right thing as recognizing the "First Genocide of the 20th Century", The Armenian Genocide.
S. B. Pie
Mutafyan Must Tell Turks No – Or Be Ignored by the World

Kevorkian's article tackles issues never raised before, despite their blaring nature. One of these is the complete complacency of the Greeks, both in Greece and the Diaspora, especially the USA. They have never protested against Turkey despite their having U.S. senators, congressmen and a Secretary of State of Greek descent. This is appalling. We need to get them involved in the political process, or maybe not (as Mr. Kevorkian would likely comment that it would be like beating a dead donkey). Yes they do have a country geographically much better than our beloved Armenia, but they have suffered from the Turks no less than us.
Roupen Dekmezian
No, Mr. Wiesel, you don’t speak on my behalf!

…if the label "genocide" should not apply to what happened to the Armenians because the word wasn't coined at the time, it follows that what happened to the Jews in World War II also was not a "genocide," since. . .etc. That is why Jews use "Holocaust" or "Sho'ah" rather than "genocide."
Kevorkian

Elie Wiesel had disappointed me and shocked me a long time ago when a reporter asked him if the Jewish Holocaust was a good enough reason to occupy Palestine and deprive the Palestinian Arabs of their ancestral lands. His answer was "what Palestine?" I'll let every sane person to draw his own conclusion about this so-called saintly "persecuted Holocaust survivor".
Yeghishe

If "genocide" was not yet a word in reference to the Armenians then what does it mean today? It seems that Mr. Wiesel has been "brain washed" by western thought. There must be comparisons of "east is not west." There can be no words to express the "horror" meted out to innocent victims. Mr. Wiesel would be wise to consider that if he were put in prison in western democracies how he would defend himself, especially if he had done no wrong! Would he willingly accept that "might is right?” I submit that he would not. And he certainly would not want to be another Mahar Arar.
Unus Ali.

… I will not even call him Mr. because it is a title, and Wiesel with his position who lies about Armenian Genocide and historical facts for a purpose/s, doesn't deserve to be called Mr. Shame on him.
Avo

Well put. Those two examples of Musa Dagh and Lemkin's inspiration ought to put Mr. Wiesel in his place, if he's honest enough with himself.
Shavarsh

Of Course We Are A Superior People; Just Ask Us and We Will Confirm It
This is the most sarcastic, vulgar, and stupid sounding invective from an Armenian who has feelings of disdain and disgust for fellow Armenians yet.
Anonymous

It may interest you to know of the existence of the following museums before you go jumping to any conclusions:
Armenian Library and Museum of America (ALMA) in Watertown, MA
http://www.almainc.org/
Ararat-Eskijian Museum in Mission Hills, CA
http://www.ararat-eskijian-museum.com/
Armenian Museum in Fresno California
http://www.armenianmuseumfresno.org/
And the planned The Armenian Museum in Los Angeles, CA
http://www.theam.org/

"If the Jews in Nome, Alaska, were to announce that there was to be a Holocaust Museum in their city, how many minutes would it take after the announcement for the fund-drive to be over-subscribed?"

Don't you mean, how many minutes would it take for the government handouts to start pouring in to fund it?
Anonymous

I can take criticism but no cynicism.
V.

Thank you very much for writing this, there is someone else with good opinions out there…It’s about time we take our head out of our … and do something for our cause and for our people, but I don’t think that will happen anytime soon; we are too busy thinking we are superior than everyone else.
Arno

Help Needed for a Two-Champagne Problem

My good friend Andy Kevorkian can be very perceptive and very interesting to read as a reporter. However his assessment of HR106, I think, with all respect, completely misses the point, as he usually does with slightly more complicated political matters. He just sticks to the domestic and US inter-Armenian politicking around HR106 rather than the international and legal aspects and consequences of (even a “tabled”) HR106. Armenia and Armenian interests are completely absent in his very limited equation.

I think the most relevant paragraph in Andy's commentary is where he deals with the Turkish State's mobilization of all its resources to defeat HR106. One should ask what did the Armenian Government do when Turkey was doing all this? Nothing! The next question should have been if nothing then what is the difference between 2007, or post 1992/Independence and especially post victory in Artsakh, and 1915-23, or the Paris Conference, the Berlin Conference, or when The Sevres Treaty and the Lausanne Treaty were being signed?

Are we, as a people and a nation, still helpless and "oppressed minorities just appealing to the 'Great Powers' to come and rescue us", one might add, as Khrimian Hayrik did, with "our paper ladle" – in Armenian "mer sherepe tghtic er"? Or do we have a state, a real state (which has scored very important victories against the Turks to our East, preventing genocide there despite at best "Great Power" indifference and in reality overt hostility)) which has debated this issue at the state level involving the whole nation – including the Diaspora- and worked out its unshakable and real de jure position (not just a token "international recognition of the Genocide")? Why not?

What are we waiting for? How long are we going to treat this most important national issue as an academic scholarly issue for various university departments or an international "loves me loves me not" game whether this or that parliament will recognise the Genocide or not!
Bagrad Nazarian, London

I had a hearty laughter; a deep satisfaction reading Mr. Kevorkian’s article. It is brief and to the point with the right cynicism and the right touch without hurt, but with a pinpoint full of wit and nuance. I just loved it. Thanks for writing it for me, for us, since I am busy writing a book, henceforth lacking disposition and time to respond. In any case I wouldn't have his talent and way of approach. Thanks and bravo. Please tell Mr. Kevorkian if he still has his champagne, he can bring it over to Zurich, we can still drink for all surviving Armenians from such unfulfilled promises! Is it love, loyalty or stupidity????!
Dalita Iskenderian Alex, writer, Zurich, Switzerland.

Armenia, Landscape & Orphans of Armenia (poems)

Wow! I didn’t know there were Armenians in Argentina. I am happy to know Armenians live in Latin American countries. I wish their population grows.
Sameerah Annisah El Zougbi Fadl, Mexico

Other

I would like to point out a very vital issue that our community’s children face daily with their parents’ old attitudes, and create very serious tragic consequences! Years and years of abusive behavior of husbands towards their partners leads wives to wish that their daughters don't get married with their own Armenian counterparts. Young girls say, "I wish I had had no father", and without any second thoughts they start to date and want to get married with non Armenians.

We mostly concentrate on our past to bring justice to our people, but we ignore our children's future by leading them away from their Armenian roots. I am witnessing our young growing up without proper leadership.

In my opinion during community gatherings, such as in Churches, schools and in any other events we must speak about this subject with organized leadership. Families must be taught how to correct and adjust their attitudes for the sake of their children's success to grow up as Armenians.

Nigohos Beranian

 

You May Also Like
Read More

De La Passion Patriotique

Pour lire en arménien cliquez sur Հայրենասիրական մոլության մասին Ֆրաներենից թարգմանեց Նվարդ Վարդանյանը Denis Donikian, Paris, 17 juin 2018 1…
Read More