Armenians in Crimea

Between 1895 and 1896 some 150 Medieval Armenian gravestones were discovered in Crimea. The earliest two were from 1027 and 1047. Armenians in large numbers began to settle in Crimea between 1280 and 1290. Armenians established close commercial ties with Iran via Trabzon and Egypt. When Sultan Mehmed conquered Crimea in 1475 he sent 40,000 people to Istanbul, mostly Armenian. One part of the Armenians also moved to Poland and Moldavia. Chardin, a well-known French traveler, wrote in 1673 that there were 800 Christian families in Crimea, most of them Armenian or Greek. The Armenians were traders, artisans and gardeners. In the years following the Kucuk Kanyerji Agreement (1774) between Russia and Turkey, Armenians also moved to eight villages in Nor Nakhichevan and its vicinity near Rostov.

Between 1895 and 1896 some 150 Medieval Armenian gravestones were discovered in Crimea. The earliest two were from 1027 and 1047. Armenians in large numbers began to settle in Crimea between 1280 and 1290. Armenians established close commercial ties with Iran via Trabzon and Egypt. When Sultan Mehmed conquered Crimea in 1475 he sent 40,000 people to Istanbul, mostly Armenian. One part of the Armenians also moved to Poland and Moldavia. Chardin, a well-known French traveler, wrote in 1673 that there were 800 Christian families in Crimea, most of them Armenian or Greek. The Armenians were traders, artisans and gardeners. In the years following the Kucuk Kanyerji Agreement (1774) between Russia and Turkey, Armenians also moved to eight villages in Nor Nakhichevan and its vicinity near Rostov.

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