Bring Back Omar Khadr from Guantanamo

LGen Honourable Roméo A. Dallaire , (Ret'd), Senator, July 2012

The case of Omar Khadr—a Canadian citizen and former child soldier—is a stain upon our society and shows a blatant disregard for Canada’s obligations under international law.

During his 10 nightmarish years at Bagram and Guantánamo Bay, Omar Khadr’s rights have been violated time and again. He has been denied the right to due process and a fair trial, the right to protection from torture, and the rights stemming from the Convention on the Rights of the Child and its Optional Protocol on Children in Armed Conflict.

LGen Honourable Roméo A. Dallaire , (Ret'd), Senator, July 2012

The case of Omar Khadr—a Canadian citizen and former child soldier—is a stain upon our society and shows a blatant disregard for Canada’s obligations under international law.

During his 10 nightmarish years at Bagram and Guantánamo Bay, Omar Khadr’s rights have been violated time and again. He has been denied the right to due process and a fair trial, the right to protection from torture, and the rights stemming from the Convention on the Rights of the Child and its Optional Protocol on Children in Armed Conflict.

After years of dragging its feet, Canada finally agreed to his return in 2010, so long as he served one additional year in Guantánamo. No one forced the government’s hand. It made its promise voluntarily. That year has passed, and yet the transfer request continues to gather dust on the minister’s desk awaiting his signature. This is simply unacceptable.

Just days ago, Marine Col. Jeffrey Colwell, chief defense counsel for military commissions openly chastised Canada for crippling US efforts to enter into plea agreements: If the US “can’t carry through on their end of the bargain, it has a chilling effect on the willingness of others to plead. There was an expectation by all parties involved that Khadr was going to be home last fall. It’s July, and he’s not.”

The Americans have held up their end of the deal. Omar Khadr has held up his end of the deal. Why is the Canadian government refusing to follow through on its commitment?

Enough is enough. Canada must keep its word — and Minister Toews must authorize Omar Khadr’s return without delay. A deal is a deal.
    
If thousands join me, we can force Canada to honour its promise. Now is the time to speak up and spread the word. Please sign this petition and help me bring Omar Khadr home.

LGen Honourable Roméo A. Dallaire, (Ret'd), Senator

Do the right thing: Authorize Omar Khadr’s repatriation without delay

                                                                         Sign the petition

Dear Minister Toews,

I am writing to urge you to authorize the repatriation of Omar Khadr without delay—a Canadian citizen and former child soldier held in Guantánamo Bay.

Over the past decade, Khadr’s rights have been violated time and again. He has been denied the right to due process and a fair trial, the right to protection from torture, and the rights stemming from the Convention on the Rights of the Child and its Optional Protocol on Children in Armed Conflict.

This month marks the 10 year anniversary of his capture as a child soldier. And while Omar Khadr continues to sit in solitary confinement in Guantánamo, what’s done is done. We now have an opportunity to do the right thing and bring Omar Khadr home.

In 2010, Canada agreed to his return, as long as he served one additional year in Guantánamo. In the House of Commons, then Minister of Foreign Affairs Lawrence Cannon said that Canada would implement the agreement. Khadr has been eligible for repatriation since November 2011 and yet we have seen no action from the government.

The Americans have held up their end of the deal. Omar Khadr has held up his end of the deal. Now Canada must follow through on its commitment. A deal is a deal. We must honour our word.

I call on you to immediately authorize Khadr’s return to Canada.
Sincerely,

[Your name]

2 comments
  1. Retun of a Murderer

    How about a heroes' welcome party for killing American soldier, give him a medal of honor, a home, a car, a gun, may be some dynamite that will make us feel better.

  2. Rights Are Rights
    Either we believe in the rule of law or we don't.

    Either we believe in human rights or we don't.

    If we claim to believe in the rule of law and in human rights, then the case of Omar Khadr is not even a questionable issue.  It is very clear cut, and Senator d'Allaire is right on.

    Otherwise, in a world without human rights and the rule of law, deemed "enemies" of a state would not stand a chance.  In fact, that is what the Ottoman state did with its Armenian minority.

    Human rights apply to all.  Even killers and mass murderers. Talaat and the rest of the CUP genocidal lot were tried and convicted in absentia, but they were tried nevertheless and their fundamental rights were NOT denied to them. And that was back in 1919 in Ottoman Turkey !!!

    Otherwise, we should be denying everyone due process, a fair trial and any suspected or alleged criminal would end up being summarily executed.

    Come to think of it, there is a country like that, it is called Saudi Arabia. They stone women to death, and publicly behead people. Yet in some cases, even they play according to international norms of justice.

    We may not like the fact that killers should get a fair trial. Especially those guilty of gruesome crimes and murderers of children. The alternative however is a worse picture. 

    The alternative is Animal Farm, where "all animals are equal, but some animals are more equal than others".

    Paregamoren

    VLA

Comments are closed.

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