False to True Friends; True to False Friends

By Avedis Kevorkian, Philadelphia PA, 20 November, 2007

Have you heard the story of the two Armenians who were walking along the street when a friend of one of them meets them and they stop and talk and exchange greetings and then introductions, There is a three-way conversation for a while, and the third man departs. After he is gone, one of the Armenians says to the other, "Did you notice that that no-good S.O.B didn't say a word about the Armenian Genocide?"

By Avedis Kevorkian, Philadelphia PA, 20 November, 2007

Have you heard the story of the two Armenians who were walking along the street when a friend of one of them meets them and they stop and talk and exchange greetings and then introductions, There is a three-way conversation for a while, and the third man departs. After he is gone, one of the Armenians says to the other, "Did you notice that that no-good S.O.B didn't say a word about the Armenian Genocide?"

If you haven't heard it, it may be because I just made up the story as an introduction to this mini-essay about the Genocide-obsessed Armenians, the Genocide über alles Armenians, the Armenians with one string on their oud.

These are the Armenians who expect everyone else in the world to not only accept the historical fact of the Armenian Genocide (a worthy hope, to be sure) but also to repeat every opinion that the Armenians have. And, also, that they never utter a word of criticism or suggest that the Armenians are less than perfect.

What prompted this train of thought are the recent events regarding Robert Fisk, the British journalist who never misses an opportunity to espouse the Armenian cause.

However. . . .

Earlier this year, Fisk visited Armenia and, speaking to an audience at one of the universities, said some things that upset some Armenians.

These Armenians burned up the Internet airwaves with blistering messages attacking Fisk and, worse, sent urgent appeals to all the Armenian to alert all the other Armenians to alert all the other
Armenian to send nasty notes to Fisk and to his (very tolerant) editor. It must be said here that Fisk's "beat" is the Middle East and not Armenia.

From what I received, it was apparent that some people did, indeed, complain to Fisk, and some people did, indeed, write to his editor. It would appear that Fisk was really not a "friend" of the Armenians, after all.

I wrote to Robert (I take this liberty, because he is an old friend) and I alerted him to the barrage of nasty messages and that his editor, too, might receive such messages. And, I suggested that he not write about the perfidious Armenians again, and let them get another person to speak on behalf of the Armenians.

However, Robert is a true journalist and drinks at the Fountain of Truth, and he ignored my suggestion and, just recently, wrote a magnificent piece criticizing this country's leaders for their hypocrisy in not recognizing the Armenian Holocaust (with a capital "H." which is how he refers to the events of 1915 to 1922). In his recent piece, he castigates the White House as no other journalist does or will do.

Now, of course, the e-mail messages praise him. But, I note that none of these messages says "Write to Fisk to thank him" or "Write to his editor to thank him for supporting Fisk and running his Armenian-oriented stories. My father used to say, "The two most difficult words for an Armenian to pronounce are 'thank you.'" The Fisks of this world are supposed to support us, so why thank them?

And, therein is the lament. The Armenians don't know who their true friends are (like Fisk), and rather trust the inept, lip-service politicians who go through the motions of friendship. Of course, I am leading up to the failed HR106. Oh, Yes, it did pass in committee–just. Now it has sunk so far below the horizon that it has disappeared.

I use the word "inept" because HR106 languished somewhere in the Congressional never-neverland for nine months. During that nine-month gestation period, the Turks produced a healthy, strong, fine-limbed baby that knocked HR106 into memory. It was a magnificent campaign.  It was a classic, and should be taught in all schools that teach government relations and lobbying. I know that when I am asked to teach or lecture on public relations, I will use it as an example of how things are done in Washington. I may even use the Armenian effort as a good example of a bad example.

Needless to say, the defenders of the inept Democratic Party leadership will have what to them are perfectly good explanations of what happened, which I won't even try to contemplate except to say that I reject them unheard.

However, during the last two months of that nine-month exercise in futility, something rather interesting took place.

In September, a freshman Congressman introduced a bill in the House of Representatives "expressing the wish of the House of Representatives that Turkey abide by the July 8, 2006, Agreement and, in effect, leave the occupied north of the island of Cyprus"–or words to that effect.

In October, that measure passed unanimously in the House. That's right, the vote was UNANIMOUS!

There was none of the boro-boro self-publicizing promotions of the Armenians and Armenian groups; there was no point-scoring exercises. The matter was brought up in the same House Sub-Committee as HR106, and received unanimous backing; it was brought up in the same House Committee as HR106 and received unanimous backing and, then the Democratic leadership brought the measure to the Floor of the House.  As far as I can determine from my Hellenic friends, it was one Congressman who guided the measure along.

And, remember, this is the same Turkey that the Armenians are aggrieved about.

The Armenians may not be able to get a non-binding resolution to the floor of the House of Representatives, but, by golly, they will make sure that the Robert Fisks of this world never stray from the "true" path.

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