Houshamadyan Publishes “Ottoman Armenians”

Three years after the launch of the website (www.houshamadyan.org), the Houshamadyan project now presents its first publication to the public: “Ottoman Armenians: Life, Culture, Society”, Vol. 1

The Editorial Board follows in this book the same principles that guided the website. One of this is to show the importance and necessity of using Armenian-language primary sources to study and understand Armenian (and non-Armenian) life in the Ottoman Empire. In fact, this is one of the common denominators that run through the articles in this book. The authors have based their work largely on Armenian primary sources—living proof of their importance and richness.

Three years after the launch of the website (www.houshamadyan.org), the Houshamadyan project now presents its first publication to the public: “Ottoman Armenians: Life, Culture, Society”, Vol. 1

The Editorial Board follows in this book the same principles that guided the website. One of this is to show the importance and necessity of using Armenian-language primary sources to study and understand Armenian (and non-Armenian) life in the Ottoman Empire. In fact, this is one of the common denominators that run through the articles in this book. The authors have based their work largely on Armenian primary sources—living proof of their importance and richness.

Houshamadyan, via its website and now through this new released book, aims to examine and understand this local milieu in order to research the daily life of the Ottoman-Armenian. There are many sides to the Ottoman-Armenian that remain unknown to us. By basing its scientific research mainly on Armenian sources, Houshamadyan strives to provide a familiar face and character to these “unknown” Armenians, to reveal their multifaceted nature, and to reconstruct their rich and diverse legacy.

The book includes 5 articles. In the opening article, Yasar Tolga Cora presents the life of Khatchatur Efendi Pastermajian, an entrepreneur from Erzurum/Karin in the second half of the 19th century. Nanor Kebranian in her article explores the empire’s penal system, and presents a composite sketch of Armenian political prisoners in the Ottoman setting, culling examples from extensive first-hand sources on the subject. The subject of Dzovinar Derderian’s piece is the periodical Artzvi Vaspurakan (Eagle of Vaspurakan), and the role it played in strengthening the concept of the fatherland (hayrenik) in the Armenian national consciousness. Vahé Tachjian in his article reflects on the work of two authors in the houshamadyan (memory books) genre, Manoog Dzeron and Alevor (Rev. Harutyun Sargisian). Mihran Minassian’s work differs in that it is a bibliography of houshamadyans. His extensive list is the best evidence of the richness of Armenian-language primary sources regarding life in the Ottoman Empire.

These pages also include numerous photographs related to Ottoman-Armenian life. And while the four major articles bring with them relevant photos, three separate photo galleries follow—of families, trades, and school life. Most of what is printed here was submitted to Houshamadyan by its readers. Such a collection illustrates the Project ongoing efforts to both assemble materials that have been passed down from generation to generation, and to make sure that such treasures become more accessible to the public.

Spanning 271 pages and featuring some 250 photographs, this first volume will be a handsome addition for any library and makes a wonderful gift as well.

You can purchase the book through Houshamdyan website. Just go to the Shop section and pay via Paypal or by making a transfer to Houshamadyan bank account. Here is the link to purchase the book:

http://www.houshamadyan.org/en/shop/books.html

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