Made-in-Armenia Ginger Bread

Ginger bread, deep-rooted in European cuisine, was introduced to that continent by an Armenian priest. In 991, Archbishop Gregory Markar traveled from Nicopolis in Pontus after being chased by the Persian army. He traveled across Europe and finally settled in Gatinais, in the Loire Valley of France. There he became a hermit and lived in an abandoned church. His diet was mainly edible roots and wild honey. He became popular figure in the area attracting bourgeois and peasants alike whom he offered hospitality and meal. The meal included a hard cake made by him. The cake, which included spices and honey, originated in a recipe from Armenia. Under the name of gingerbread it became popular in the region and in France. Soon after, the Germans imported it to their country. To this day, Loire Valley tourist guides provide details of Archbishop Markar’s life and gingerbread recipe.

Ginger bread, deep-rooted in European cuisine, was introduced to that continent by an Armenian priest. In 991, Archbishop Gregory Markar traveled from Nicopolis in Pontus after being chased by the Persian army. He traveled across Europe and finally settled in Gatinais, in the Loire Valley of France. There he became a hermit and lived in an abandoned church. His diet was mainly edible roots and wild honey. He became popular figure in the area attracting bourgeois and peasants alike whom he offered hospitality and meal. The meal included a hard cake made by him. The cake, which included spices and honey, originated in a recipe from Armenia. Under the name of gingerbread it became popular in the region and in France. Soon after, the Germans imported it to their country. To this day, Loire Valley tourist guides provide details of Archbishop Markar’s life and gingerbread recipe.

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