No Prizes for Guessing Who Has Most Human Rights Violations

Avedis Kevorkian, Philadelphia, PA USA, 16 May 2012

Under normal circumstances, it is the sort of report that one would send to the President of the United States of America and to the Secretary of State suggesting that they use America’s authority to tell the country to improve its human-rights record.

After all, America does tell the world how to behave. Even daring to tell China that its record on Human Rights doesn’t meet America’s standards.

Avedis Kevorkian, Philadelphia, PA USA, 16 May 2012

Under normal circumstances, it is the sort of report that one would send to the President of the United States of America and to the Secretary of State suggesting that they use America’s authority to tell the country to improve its human-rights record.

After all, America does tell the world how to behave. Even daring to tell China that its record on Human Rights doesn’t meet America’s standards.

But the report in question concerns Turkey, and there isn’t anything “normal” about the circumstances involving Ankara and Washington. Turkey dictates; America obeys. Turkey can do no wrong and hasn’t done anything wrong in its history. If you doubt this, ask our esteemed President, and he will confirm the Turkish version of history.

However, for some strange reason, America and Turkey have not yet been able to completely take over the European Court of Human Rights, based in Strasbourg.

And, so it is that in its report, issued earlier this week, the Court said that in the 52 years between 1959 and 2011, Turkey has achieved the unenviable record of being the first among the countries convicted of rights violations! Imagine what Washington would do with such a report if any other country were to be so cited.

Even when it is second (to Russia) in the number of cases brought before the Court, Turkey manages to rank number one on the basis of per-capita cases.

What is even more of an achievement, Turkey has been cited for at least one case touching on every article of the Convention on Human Rights. Now, that takes some effort, and the Turks should be rewarded for this achievement, as well. Among the leading citations against Turkey are the right to a fair trial, violation of the provision against inhumane and degrading treatment, and the right to personal liberty and security.

Lest the defenders of Turkey (President Medz Yeghern and Secrearty Hiliar Clinkhead, among them) mumble something about a quirk in statistics, the report says: “Turkey ranked first among the number of countries convicted for rights violations by the European Court of Human Rights in 2010. Decisions regarding Turkey were mostly based on violations in aspect to the fairness and the length of trials.”

Among the decisions that Turkey has lost are every case involving properties stolen from Greek Cypriots in the illegally occupied north of Cyprus.

Since Washington is merely an “Observer” at the Court, it probably won’t apologize to Ankara for the report, but it will join Ankara in ignoring the implications of it.

When crimes are not punished, a sense of impunity grows and the guilty’s crimes get more numerous and worse. Washington will see to it that the Report gets little publicity in America and that no action be taken and–certainly–no criticism be uttered against Ankara. Thus, we may expect to see that Turkey once again is number one, in next year’s report.

Does the word “hypocrisy” come to mind?

 

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