Tableau General de l’Empire Ottoman

In “Constantinople” Philip Mansel writes: “The Swedish embassy inspired the chief literary monument to the diplomatic life of the city [Constnatinople]. Its author was an Armenian Catholic of Constantinople, born in 1740, called Mouradges. A dragoman at the Swedish embassy from 1765 to 1782, he lived in a kiosk in the garden of the Palais de Suede. In 1780 he was ennobled by Gustavus III as Moiuradges d’Obsson, from his Turkish sobriquet ‘tosson’ or stout. He was a historian as well as diplomat. The Swedish ambassador, Gustav Celsing, persuaded him to write a description of the empire rather than, as originally planned, a history of the reign of Selim II. The result, “Tableau general de l’Empire Ottoman (3 vols., Paris, 1787-1820), is just as useful for study of the Ottoman Empire, as the monument of the French invasion, Denon’s Description de ‘Egypte, for the study of Egypt.

In “Constantinople” Philip Mansel writes: “The Swedish embassy inspired the chief literary monument to the diplomatic life of the city [Constnatinople]. Its author was an Armenian Catholic of Constantinople, born in 1740, called Mouradges. A dragoman at the Swedish embassy from 1765 to 1782, he lived in a kiosk in the garden of the Palais de Suede. In 1780 he was ennobled by Gustavus III as Moiuradges d’Obsson, from his Turkish sobriquet ‘tosson’ or stout. He was a historian as well as diplomat. The Swedish ambassador, Gustav Celsing, persuaded him to write a description of the empire rather than, as originally planned, a history of the reign of Selim II. The result, “Tableau general de l’Empire Ottoman (3 vols., Paris, 1787-1820), is just as useful for study of the Ottoman Empire, as the monument of the French invasion, Denon’s Description de ‘Egypte, for the study of Egypt.

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