Trade Between Turkey and Canada

By Sarkis Assadourian, Toronto, 12 April 2010

In the below piece, Sarkis Assadourian, the former MP and citizenship judge, points out that Turkish trade threats against countries that recognize the Genocide of Armenians are nothing more than hot air. For example, since Canada recognized the Genocide of Armenians in 2004, trade between Canada and Turkey has soared.

By Sarkis Assadourian, Toronto, 12 April 2010

In the below piece, Sarkis Assadourian, the former MP and citizenship judge, points out that Turkish trade threats against countries that recognize the Genocide of Armenians are nothing more than hot air. For example, since Canada recognized the Genocide of Armenians in 2004, trade between Canada and Turkey has soared.

Dear Friends,

I had the chance to review the Department of Foreign Affairs and International Trade (DFAIT) website for the latest trade statistics between Canada and Turkey. In the past some of you may have wondered about the consequences of the trade between the two countries as a result of Canada’s recognition, on April 21, 2004, of the Turkish Genocide of the Armenians. I was the only Canadian/Armenian MP in the House of Commons and I knew then (along with many of my supporters) that Turkey would NEVER carry out the threats against Canada and it was just blackmail and empty threats. This is the proof we need at this time.

It is obvious from statements below, that the trade between the two countries have DOUBLED in four years (2004-2008), reaching a whopping $1.9 billion since the passing of the Genocide Resolution (Nov. 09 update).

In the future, any country that wishes to pass similar resolutions need only look at the below Canadian-Turkish trade statistics.

Best regards,
 
Sarkis Assadourian

Trade
Canada has a relatively strong commercial relationship with Turkey — the world’s 17th largest economy, a G-20 member, and the third most populous nation in Europe (71.9 million) after Germany and Russia. Given its strategic geographic location and negotiated trade agreements, Turkey offers excellent access to markets in Europe (including preferential Customs Union access to the European Union), the Caucasus, Central Asia, and the Middle East.

Canada-Turkey bilateral merchandise trade has almost doubled in the last five years, reaching $1.9 billion in 2008. Canadian exports to Turkey reached $1.2 billion in 2008, with a product mix ranging from commodities to advanced technology goods. These included approximately $330 million worth of agricultural goods. Turkey is Canada’s 22nd largest merchandise export market and the 45th largest source of merchandise imports.

Investment
In recent years, Turkey has been one of the top global destinations for Foreign Direct Investment (FDI). Many Canadian companies have recognized the great investment potential Turkey offers. Canadian investments in Turkey stood at about $1.1 billion in 2009 and Export Development Canada has identified the country as a strategic market of opportunity for Canadian firms.

Niche opportunities exist for Canadian investors, particularly in the energy, information and communication technologies, mining, environment, and agriculture/agri-food sectors. Commercial opportunities in Turkey match Canadian supply capabilities.

 

1 comment
  1. Bravo!

    This is exactly the approach to be adopted.
     
    It is essential to explain to everyone how Turkey needs (nearly all) other countries much more than they need it; and why good relations are levers to be used on Turkey rather than by it.

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